Pashur


Pashur

Pashur or Pashhur was the name of at least two priests contemporary with the prophet Jeremiah and who are mentioned in the Book of Jeremiah.

(1). Pashur the son of Immer (possibly the same as Amariah, Neh. 10:3; 12:2), was deputy chief priest [Heb. "paqid nagid"] of the temple (Jer. 20:1, 2). (At this time, the "nagid", or "governor", of the temple would have been Seraiah - 1 Chr. 6:14.) Apparently enraged at the plainness with which Jeremiah uttered his solemn warnings of coming judgements because of the abounding iniquity of the times, Pashur "smote Jeremiah the prophet" (this could mean that he ordered the temple police to seize him and inflict the corporal punishment of up to forty stripes found in Deut. 25:3); then he placed him in the stocks in the high gate of Benjamin, where he remained all night.

Upon being set free in the morning, Jeremiah went to Pashur (Jer. 20:3, 5) and announced to him that God had changed his name to "Magor-missabib", i.e., "terror on every side" and that he would be later carried captive to Babylon and die there.

(2). Pashur, the son of Malchiah, was another priest, who was sent by king Zedekiah to Jeremiah to inquire of the Lord regarding the impending attack of King Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon (Jer. 21:1). In Jer. 38:1-6, this Pashur was also one of four men who advised Zedekiah to put Jeremiah to death for his prophecies of doom but who ended up throwing him into a cistern.

(3). Pashur the father of Gedaliah (Jer. 38:1), possibly the same Pashur as (1) above. Gedaliah was another of the four men who threw Jeremiah into the cistern.


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  • Jeremiah 20 — 1 Now Pashur the son of Immer the priest, who was also chief governor in the house of the LORD, heard that Jeremiah prophesied these things. 2 Then Pashur smote Jeremiah the prophet, and put him in the stocks that were in the high gate of… …   The King James version of the Bible

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