United States Department of the Navy


United States Department of the Navy
Department of the Navy
DON
United States Department of the Navy Seal.svg
Seal of the Department of the Navy
Agency overview
Formed 1798
Headquarters Pentagon
Agency executive Ray Mabus (SECNAV)
Parent agency Department of Defense

The Department of the Navy of the United States of America (DON) was established by an Act of Congress on 30 April 1798, to provide a government organizational structure to the United States Navy and, from 1834 onwards, for the United States Marine Corps, and when directed by the President, of the United States Coast Guard as a service within the Navy. The Department of the Navy was an Executive Department and the Secretary of the Navy was a member of the President's cabinet until 1949, when amendments to the National Security Act of 1947 changed the name of the National Military Establishment to the Department of Defense and made it an Executive Department. The Department of the Navy then became, along with the Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force, a Military Department within the Department of Defense: subject to the authority, direction and control of the Secretary of Defense.

Contents

Leadership

Navy Department, mainly the Office of the Secretary, organizational structure (2006.)

The Department of the Navy is headed by the Secretary of the Navy, also known as the SECNAV in naval jargon, who has the authority to conduct all of the affairs of the Department: subject to lawful authority, the Secretary of Defense, and the President. The Secretary of the Navy is appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate.[1] The Secretary is assisted by an Under Secretary of the Navy, four Assistant Secretaries of the Navy and a General Counsel of the Department of the Navy, who are also appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate.

The highest ranking military officers in the Department of the Navy are the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the Marine Corps, who are the principal military advisors to the Secretary of the Navy. They supervise their respective military services of the Department of the Navy, and in a separate capacity serves as members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. They are assisted by a Vice Chief of Naval Operations and an Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps.

Composition

Unlike its Army and Air Force counterparts, the Department of the Navy comprises two uniformed services, also called the Naval Services, the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. The Department of the Navy consists of all elements of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. The Term "Navy Department", according to Navy Regulations Section 0204-2, refers only to the executive offices at the Seat of Government.

The Department of the Navy is composed of the following:[2]

  • Office of the Secretary of the Navy, also known as the Secretariat.
  • Office of the Chief of Naval Operations.
  • Headquarters Marine Corps.
  • The entire operating forces, including naval aviation, of the Navy and of the Marine Corps, and the reserve components of those operating forces.
  • All field activities, headquarters, forces, bases, installations, activities, and functions under the control or supervision of the Secretary of the Navy.
  • The Coast Guard when it is operating as a service in the Navy.

2007 - Unsuccessful attempt to rename as the "Department of the Navy and Marine Corps"

In H.R. 1585, the Fiscal Year 2008 National Defense Authorization Bill (NDAA) for 2008, the Department of the Navy was to be renamed the Department of the Navy and Marine Corps. The Bill passed in the on 17 May 2007.[3]

The proposed renaming encountered opposition among members of the DOD civilian leadership and among senior Navy admirals and Marine Corps generals. In the U.S. Senate, the House Bill was replaced by SA2011, an amendment in the nature of a substitute, removing the renaming provision along with other changes. The amendment was sponsored by Senator Carl Levin, Democrat of Michigan, introduced on 9 July 2007, and agreed to by unanimous consent on 1 October 2007.[4]

The House version including the provision was withdrawn in conference committee.

References

  1. ^ 10 USC §5013, Accessed on 2011-03-23.
  2. ^ 10 USC §5061, Accessed on 2011-03-23
  3. ^ "H.R. 1585: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008". Legislation: 2007-2008 (110th Congress). GovTrack.us. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h110-1585. Retrieved 2007. 
  4. ^ "S.Amdt. 2011: In the nature of a substitute.". Legislation: 2007-2008 (110th Congress). GovTrack.us. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/amendment.xpd?session=110&amdt=s2011. Retrieved 24 December 2007. 

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