Arm


Arm
Arm
Upperarm.jpg
The human arm
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Cross-section through the middle of upper arm.
Latin bracchium

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In human anatomy, the arm is the part of the upper limb between the shoulder and the elbow joints. In other animals, the term arm can also be used for analogous structures, such as one of the paired forelimbs of a four-legged animal or the arms of cephalopods. In anatomical usage, the term arm refers specifically to the segment between the shoulder and the elbow,[1][2] while the segment between the elbow and wrist is the forearm. However, in common, literary, and historical usage, arm refers to the entire upper limb from shoulder to wrist. This article uses the former definition; see upper limb for the wider definition.

In primates the arm is adapted for precise positioning of the hand and thus assist in the hand's manipulative tasks. The ball and socket shoulder joint allows for movement of the arms in a wide circular plane, while the structure of the two forearm bones which can rotate around each other allows for additional range of motion at that level.

Contents

Skeleton

Bone structure of a human arm.

The humerus is the bone of the arm. It joins with the scapula above in the shoulder at the glenohumeral joint and with the ulna and radius below at the elbow. The elbow joint is the hinge joint between the distal end of the humerus and the proximal ends of the radius and ulna. The humerus cannot be broken easily. Its strength allows it to handle loading up to 300 pounds (140 kg).

Muscles

The arm is divided by a fascial layer (known as lateral and medial intermuscular septa) separating the muscles into two osteofascial compartments: the anterior and the posterior compartments of the arm. The fascia merges with the periosteum (outer bone layer) of the humerus. The compartments contain muscles which are innervated by the same nerve and perform the same action.

Two other muscles are considered to be partially in the arm:

  • The large deltoid muscle is considered to have part of its body in the anterior compartment. This muscle is the main abductor muscle of the upper limb and extends over the shoulder.
  • The brachioradialis muscle originates in the arm but inserts into the forearm. This muscle is responsible for rotating the hand so its palm faces forward (supination).

Nerve and blood supply

The cubital fossa (colloquially known as the elbow pit) is clinically important for venepuncture and for blood pressure measurement.

Innervation

Cutaneous innervation of the right upper extremity.

The musculocutaneous nerve, from C5, C6, C7, is the main supplier of muscles of the anterior compartment. It originates from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus of nerves. It pierces the coracobrachialis muscle and gives off branches to the muscle, as well as to brachialis and biceps brachii. It terminates as the anterior cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

The radial nerve, which is from the fifth cervical spinal nerve to the first thoracic spinal nerve, originates as the continuation of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. This nerve enters the lower triangular space (an imaginary space bounded by, amongst others, the shaft of the humerus and the triceps brachii) of the arm and lies deep to the triceps brachii. Here it travels with a deep artery of the arm (the profunda brachii), which sits in the radial groove of the humerus. This fact is very important clinically as a fracture of the bone at the shaft of the bone here can cause lesions or even transections in the nerve.

Other nerves passing through give no supply to the arm. These include:

  • The median nerve, nerve origin C5-T1, which is a branch of the lateral and medial cords of the brachial plexus. This nerve continues in the arm, travelling in a plane between the biceps and triceps muscles. At the cubital fossa, this nerve is deep to the pronator teres muscle and is the most medial structure in the fossa. The nerve passes into the forearm.
  • The ulnar nerve, origin C8-T1, is a continuation of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. This nerve passes in the same plane as the median nerve, between the biceps and triceps muscles. At the elbow, this nerve travels posterior to the medial epicondyle of the humerus. This means that condylar fractures can cause lesion to this nerve.

Arteries

Main arteries of the arm.

The main artery in the arm is the brachial artery. This artery is a continuation of the axillary artery. The point at which the axillary becomes the brachial is distal to the lower border of teres major. The brachial artery gives off an important branch, the profunda brachii (deep artery of the arm). This branching occurs just below the lower border of teres major.

The brachial artery continues to the cubital fossa in the anterior compartment of the arm. It travels in a plane between the biceps and triceps muscles, the same as the median nerve and basilic vein. It is accompanied by venae comitantes (accompanying veins). It gives branches to the muscles of the anterior compartment. The artery is in between the median nerve and the tendon of the biceps muscle in the cubital fossa. It then continues into the forearm.

The profunda brachii travels through the lower triangular space with the radial nerve. From here onwards it has an intimate relationship with the radial nerve. They are both found deep to the triceps muscle and are located on the spiral groove of the humerus. Therefore fracture of the bone may not only lead to lesion of the radial nerve, but also haematoma of the internal structures of the arm. The artery then continues on to anastamose with the recurrent radial branch of the brachial artery, providing a diffuse blood supply for the elbow joint.

Veins

The veins of the arm carry blood from the extremities of the limb, as well as drain the arm itself. The two main veins are the basilic and the cephalic veins. There is a connecting vein between the two, the median cubital vein, which passes through the cubital fossa and is clinically important for venepuncture (withdrawing blood).

The basilic vein travels on the medial side of the arm and terminates at the level of the seventh rib.

The cephalic vein travels on the lateral side of the arm and terminates as the axillary vein. It passes through the deltopectoral triangle, a space between the deltoid and the pectoralis major muscles.

Additional images

See also

References

  1. ^ "arm" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary[dead link]
  2. ^ MeSH Arm

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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • arm — ärm …   Kölsch Dialekt Lexikon

  • Arm — Arm, n. [AS. arm, earm; akin to OHG. aram, G., D., Dan., & Sw. arm, Icel. armr, Goth. arms, L. armus arm, shoulder, and prob. to Gr. ? joining, joint, shoulder, fr. the root ? to join, to fit together; cf. Slav. rame. ?. See {Art}, {Article}.] 1 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Arm — Arm, ärmer, ärmste, adj. et adv. welches überhaupt den Zustand der Beraubung einer Sache ausdruckt, und zwar, 1. In eigentlicher Bedeutung, des zeitlichen Vermögens beraubt. Ein armer Mensch, ein armer Mann, eine arme Frau. Arm seyn. Arm werden.… …   Grammatisch-kritisches Wörterbuch der Hochdeutschen Mundart

  • ARM — steht für: Arm, eine der oberen Extremitäten des menschlichen Körpers Arm (Name), ein biblischer Name Arm (Stern), der Stern Eta Capricorni arm steht für: arm, Adjektiv, siehe Armut Personen mit Namen Arm sind: Mark Arm (* 1962), US… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • arm — arm1 [ärm] n. [ME < OE earm; akin to L armus, Goth arms, OHG arm: see ART1] 1. a) an upper limb of the human body b) in anatomy, the part of the upper limb between the shoulder and the elbow c) in nontechnical use, the part of the upper limb… …   English World dictionary

  • Arm — …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • arm — arm; arm·ful; arm·less; arm·let; arm·scye; dis·arm; en·arm; re·arm; un·arm; ARM; dis·arm·er; dis·arm·ing·ly; …   English syllables

  • Arm — Arm: Die gemeingerm. Körperteilbezeichnung mhd., ahd. arm, got. arms, engl. arm, schwed. arm beruht mit verwandten Wörtern in anderen idg. Sprachen auf einer Bildung zu der idg. Wurzel *ar‹ə› »fügen, zupassen«, vgl. z. B. lat. armus »Oberarm,… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • Arm — Arm, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Armed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Arming}.] [OE. armen, F. armer, fr. L. armare, fr. arma, pl., arms. See {arms}.] 1. To take by the arm; to take up in one s arms. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] And make him with our pikes and partisans A …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Arm — Sm std. (8. Jh.), mhd. arm, ahd. ar(a)m, as. arm Stammwort. Aus g. * arma m. Arm , auch in gt. arms, anord. armr, ae. earm, afr. erm. Dieses aus einem indogermanischen Wort für Schultergelenk, Arm , das in zwei Ablautformen * arə mo und * ṛə mo… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • arm — Ⅰ. arm [1] ► NOUN 1) each of the two upper limbs of the human body from the shoulder to the hand. 2) a side part of a chair supporting a sitter s arm. 3) a narrow body of water or land projecting from a larger body. 4) a branch or division of an… …   English terms dictionary


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