Mountain Dew


Mountain Dew
Mountain Dew
Mountain Dew logo.svg
Type Citrus soft drink
Manufacturer PepsiCo
Country of origin United States
Introduced 1948
Color Green, Blue, Red, Orange, Purple, White, Yellow, Black, and Gold
Flavor Citrus blend
Variants Regular
Diet
Caffeine-Free
Caffeine-Free Diet
Code Red
Diet Code Red
LiveWire
Baja Blast (Taco Bell™ only)
Voltage
Throwback
White Out
Game Fuel Citrus-cherry
Game Fuel Tropical
Diet Supernova
Cherry Fusion (Wienerschnitzel only)
X-Treme (Kuwait and Saudi Arabia only)
Grape (Japan only)
Energy (UK & Ireland Only)
Adrenaline (Poland Only)
Thin Ice Freeze (slurpee only)
Blue Shock (slurpee only)
Voltage Freeze (slurpee only)
White Out Freeze (slurpee only)
Mountain Dew Coolata
Related products Vault
Mello Yello
Website mountaindew.com

Mountain Dew (currently stylized as Mtn Dew) is a citrus-flavored carbonated soft drink brand produced and owned by PepsiCo. The original formula was invented in the 1940s by two Tennessee beverage bottlers, Barney and Ally Hartman, and was first marketed in Marion, VA, Knoxville and Johnson City, Tennessee. A revised formula was created by Bill Bridgforth in 1958. The Mountain Dew brand and production rights were acquired by the Pepsi-Cola company in 1964, at which point its distribution expanded more widely across the United States.[1]

Between the 1940s and 1980s, Mountain Dew consisted of a single citrus-flavored version. Diet Mountain Dew was introduced in 1988,[2] followed by Mountain Dew Red which was introduced - and discontinued - in 1988.[3] While Mountain Dew Red was short-lived, it represented the beginning of a long-term trend of Mountain Dew being produced in different flavor variations. This product line extension trend has continued in the 2000s, with expansion into specialty, limited time production, and retailer-specific (Taco Bell, 7-Eleven) variations of Mountain Dew.

Production was first extended to the UK in 1996, though this initial debut was short-lived as it was phased out in 1998. The product returned to the UK under the name "Mountain Dew Energy" in 2010 and returned to the Republic of Ireland in Spring 2011.[4] As of 2009, Mountain Dew represented a 6.7 percent share of the overall carbonated soft drinks market in the U.S.[5] Its competition includes Vault, Mello Yello, and Sun Drop; Mountain Dew accounts for eighty percent of citrus soft drinks sold within the U.S.[6]

Contents

Packaging

The name “Mountain Dew” was first trademarked by Ally and Barney Hartman in the 1940s, who coined the name from a colloquial term for moonshine whiskey. Early bottles and signage carried the reference forward by showing a cartoon-stylized mountaineer. The first sketches of the original Mountain Dew bottle labels were devised in 1948 by John Brichetto, and the representation on product packaging has changed at multiple points in the history of the beverage.[3]

PepsiCo (known then as The Pepsi-Cola Company) acquired the Mountain Dew brand in 1964, and shortly thereafter in 1973 the logo was modified as the company sought to shift its focus to a “younger, outdoorsy” generation. This direction continued as the logo remained the same through the 1970s, 80s and into the late 1990s. Later updates to the logo were made in 1999 and again in 2005.[3] On October 15, 2008, the Mountain Dew logo was redesigned to "Mtn Dew" within the U.S. market, as a result of a PepsiCo rebranding of its core carbonated soft-drink products.[7] However, the variant flavors continued to use the previous design until May 2011, when it was revealed that the "Code Red", "LiveWire", "Voltage", and "Baja Blast" flavor variants would be given redesigned packaging, including new logos to correspond with the "Mtn Dew" style. The returning flavors "Pitch Black" "Supernova" "Typhoon" and "Game Fuel" were given redesigned packaging and logos for their re-release.[8][9]

Ingredients

In its primary market of the United States, the ingredient composition of Mountain Dew is listed as: “carbonated water, High-fructose corn syrup (in much of the U.S.), concentrated orange juice, citric acid, natural flavors, sodium benzoate, caffeine, sodium citrate, erythorbic acid, gum arabic, calcium disodium EDTA, brominated vegetable oil, and yellow 5.”[10] The ingredient makeup of Mountain Dew varies based on the country of production. For example, in Canada, the sweetener listed is "fructose/sucrose" and it is caffeine-free by default.[11]

In response to consumer insistence on a more natural product, PepsiCo in 2009 released a limited run production of Mountain Dew Throwback, a variation consisting of sugar in place of high fructose corn syrup.[12] Mountain Dew Throwback has since been re-released for brief periods (generally 8–12 weeks at a time), including a 2nd wave from December 2009 - February 2010[13] and a 3rd wave in Summer/Fall 2010.[14] A 4th limited production run began in March 2011, lasting for a total of eight weeks before becoming a permanent addition to the Mountain Dew flavor line-up.[15]

Two unfounded urban legends about Mountain Dew ingredients exist. One is that it causes shrunken testicles and/or penis size. The other is that it lowers sperm count.[16] Both myths are typically attributed to the dye Yellow #5 (tartrazine). Yellow #5 has never been scientifically linked to any of the alleged effects in the legends; nor has any other component of the drink. Thus, there is no evidence that Mountain Dew is any more hazardous (or beneficial) to health than other caffeinated, sugar-sweetened soft drinks, provided one is not allergic to Yellow #5.[17]

For information on the health effects of consuming large quantities of brominated vegetable oil, see brominated vegetable oil.

Caffeine Content: 54 mg/12 fl oz.

Historical Meanings

An old 10 ounce Mountain Dew bottle (date unknown): "It'll tickle yore innards!" This design has been used for Mountain Dew Throwback since 2010.

Mountain Dew was originally Southern and/or Irish slang for moonshine (homemade whiskey), or poitín as it is called in Ireland. An 1882 song from Ireland "The Rare Old Mountain Dew" (Words by Edward Harrigan. Music by Dave Braham) begins:

Let grasses grow and waters flow
In a free and easy way,
But give me enough of the rare ould stuff,
That's made near Galway Bay,
Come gougers all from Donegal, Sligo and Leitrim too,
And we'll give them the slip and we'll take a sip,
Of the rare ould mountain dew.

A 1947 version by Grandpa Jones (1913-1998) may be better-known to Americans:

There's a big holler tree down the road here from me
where you lay down a doller er two.
When you come round the bend and when you come back again
there's a jug full of good old mountain dew
Oh they call it that old mountain dew and them that refuse it are few.
I'll shut up my mug if you fill up my jug with some good old mountain dew.

Promotions

AMP Energy

AMP Energy is an energy drink distributed by PepsiCo under the Mountain Dew brand. Launched in 2001, AMP was originally known as "Mountain Dew AMP". From 2007–2008, several additional flavors of AMP were introduced.

Taco Bell's Mountain Dew Baja Blast

Since 2004, Mountain Dew has offered Taco Bell stores the exclusive right to sell Mountain Dew Baja Blast, a fruity variety of the popular soft drink.[citation needed] Since then, rumors have appeared on the internet saying that Baja Blast was going to be bottled and sold in stores. This has been confirmed as a hoax, as PepsiCo (owner of Mountain Dew) and Yum! brands (owner of Taco Bell) have a strict contract prohibiting its distribution anywhere outside of Taco Bell stores, and this gives Taco Bell the privilege of being the only provider of Baja Blast.[citation needed]

DEWmocracy

Original Dewmocracy (2008) flavor finalists: Revolution, Voltage and Supernova

Beginning in 2007, Mountain Dew began a promotion entitled “DEWmocracy”,[18] which involved fans of the beverage brand electing new flavors, colors, names, packaging graphics and advertisements for upcoming Mountain Dew products.[19] The campaign has been the subject of recognition within the advertising industry,[20] cited as one of the earliest and longest-running examples of a consumer product brand employing crowdsourcing to make decisions which are traditionally made internally by employees.[21] In its initial phase, Dewmocracy participation and voting was conducted via an online game.[22] Television advertisements at the time featured actor Forest Whitaker asking people to decide the next new flavor of Mountain Dew. Online voters selected from three choices: Supernova (a strawberry-melon flavor), Revolution (a berry flavor), and Voltage (a raspberry-citrus flavor). Each included ginseng. On August 17, 2008, Voltage was announced as the winning flavor. It was released on December 29, 2008.[23] According to Beverage Digest, sales of Dewmocracy flavors totaled 25 million cases in 2008.[24]

Dewmocracy 2 (2010) flavor finalists: White Out, Distortion and Typhoon

Mountain Dew announced the continuation of the Dewmocracy campaign –referred to as “Dewmocracy 2”[25] – which launched in July 2009. A marked difference between Dewmocracy 2 and its predecessor is the involvement of a broader range of online components to conduct voting, expanding beyond the Dewmocracy website to include Facebook, Twitter, YouTube,[26] and what is referred to as the “Dew Labs Community” – a private, online forum for the “most passionate Dew fans.”[27] In July 2009, Dew Labs sampling trucks distributed product samples of seven potential flavor variations. At the same time, 50 “Dew fanatics” were chosen based on their video submissions to the video website 12seconds.tv, and were shipped boxes of the seven prototype flavors.[21] From the initial seven flavors, taste testers were asked to elect three final flavors for later release at retail stores. The three new candidate flavors were Mountain Dew Typhoon (red-orange), a tropical strawberry-pineapple flavor, Mountain Dew White Out (white), described as a smooth citrus flavor, and Mountain Dew Distortion (green), a lime flavor. The three new candidate flavors were released on April 19, 2010 and voting continued until June 14. The following day, White Out was announced as the winner. Mountain Dew White Out was officially released for sale on October 4, 2010. A limited production White Out Slurpee was made available at 7-Eleven beginning in January 2011.[28]

Mountain Dew Marketing Director Brett O'Brien said in an interview that since the first two dewmocracy increased many sales, a third one may occur during the summer of 2012. This is of yet unconfirmed.

Game Fuel

2007 Halo 3 edition

In 2007, after using the term "Game Fuel" to direct their sodas to the video-gaming subculture, Mountain Dew officially announced a new flavor variant with the title. Coinciding with the release of the Xbox 360 game Halo 3, Mountain Dew Game Fuel sported a label that was almost entirely image-based, showing promotional artwork for the game and featuring the game series' main character Master Chief prominently. This variant remained on shelves for 12 weeks, and was discontinued afterwards.

2009 World of Warcraft edition

Two years later, the website for the popular MMORPG World of Warcraft was updated to reveal two Mountain Dew Game Fuel flavors would be coming to shelves in June 2009 and would promote the online video game. Shortly afterwards, official bottle art was released, and showed that one of the Game Fuel flavors would promote a certain player class in the game, while the other would promote a different class. It was also revealed that one of the two World of Warcraft Game Fuel flavors was exactly the same drink from the original Halo 3 promotion, with updated packaging. Both drinks were given World of Warcraft-based packaging, and sported the newly-updated "MTN Dew" logo. Like their precursor, these two flavors lasted for 12 weeks and were discontinued.

2011 Modern Warfare 3 edition

In early August 2011, an eBay auction was set up by a Pepsi employee for two unreleased flavors of Mountain Dew Game Fuel. Images of these two flavors showed that they were to promote the upcoming game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, that one of them would once again be the original Halo 3 flavor with updated packaging while the other would be a new, tropical-flavored drink (indicating it may be the Mystery flavor tested by Dew Labs members), and that they would be in stores in the near future. The auction ended on August 17, with the winning bid at $49.00 (plus $5.65 shipping charges). The status of these two flavors remained unconfirmed until August 24, when Mountain Dew officially announced the two flavors on their Facebook page, stating that they will return in October 2011 and will feature codes that grant players double experience points in-game. Both flavors were mailed out to Dew Labs members in early September 2011, a month before the planned release date. Later that same month, it was revealed through the Facebook page that Game Fuel would be arriving to the public in mid-October, though it would vary by market. Just as promised, Game Fuel began appearing as early as the first week of October, and was officially released as of October 10th.

Green Label

A limited edition bottle featuring Green Label art

Mountain Dew’s Green Label promotion originated in 2007 with “Green Label Art”,[29] which entails individual artists submitting their own Mountain Dew can and bottle designs to be chosen by popular vote for actual production and distribution.[30] The Mountain Dew brand has been featuring limited edition works of art on its bottles and cans since 2007 and as of 2011 this campaign has remained active; however the Green Label concept has since branched out into four specific categories: art, sound (music), sports and gaming.[31]

Beginning in 2007, Mountain Dew put a small line of limited edition aluminum bottles into limited-release production, featuring artwork from a range of tattoo artists and other artists. This initial series marked the first use of the termGreen Label Art to describe the use of artistic works on Mountain Dew product packaging.[32] In June 2010, a contest entitled “Green Label Art: Shop Series” was announced,[33] involving 35 independent skateboard retail store owners who partnered with artists local to their areas in order to design and submit future can artwork designs.[34] Approximately one million votes were submitted by the conclusion of this contest in October of the same year, with Street Science Skate Shop – a store in Tracy, California – being named the winner of a cash prize. This winning can design is scheduled to appear on Mountain Dew cans at some point in 2011, according to Skateboarder magazine.[35]

In 2008, a Mountain Dew-sponsored music label was launched under the name Green Label Sound.[36] The label releases exclusive singles which it makes available for free download, with the intent of providing a broader exposure to emerging recording artists. Bands involved include Matt & Kim, The Cool Kids and Chromeo, among others. According to Mikey Rocks of The Cool Kids, “Green Label Sound is giving artists like ourselves an opportunity to get to a different scale than we were previously on.”[37] In December 2010, a Mountain Dew Code Red television advertisement was produced, incorporating the hip-hop artist Jay Electronica performing his song titled “The Announcement”.[38] The advertisement concludes with the tagline: “Hip Hop is different on the mountain”, representing continued incorporation of hip hop (along with other music genres) into Mountain Dew promotional campaigns.[39]

2007 Dew Tour BMX in Salt Lake City, Utah

Sponsorship of individual athletes who participate in professional action sports has been a part of the Mountain Dew brand since the late 1990s, with present sponsorship including Eli Reed (skateboarder), Paul Rodriguez (skateboarder), and Danny Davis (snowboarder).[40] Mountain Dew also sponsors its own namesake festival, "The Dew Tour," which is an action sports tour made up of multiple events held in five U.S. cities over the course of several months.[41] The first Dew Tour was held in the summer of 2005 with events in skateboarding, BMX and Freestyle Motocross. In 2008 it expanded to add a “Winter Dew Tour” as well, comprising snowboarding and snow skiing competitions. It is “the most watched and attended action sports event in the world,” according to Transworld Snowboarding magazine.[42][43] In coordination with its Dew Tour sponsorship, a sponsored television show entitled Mountain Dew’s Green Label Experience premiered on Fuel TV in July, 2010, for the primary purpose of broadcasting interviews with action sports athletes from each of the stops on the Dew Tour.[44]

Under the term Green Label Gaming – coined in 2007 – Mountain Dew has broadened its sponsorship of independent video game designers and players. The brand is often the subject of media attention for its popularity among video game enthusiasts, as several flavors of Mountain Dew have been produced in partnership with video games such as Halo[45] and World of Warcraft.[46] In December 2008, Mountain Dew produced a 30-minute television special which documented independent gamers in Japan and the U.S., which aired on the Spike TV network.[47] In 2009, Mountain Dew sponsored two prominent gaming events: the Independent Games Festival and the Game Developers Conference.[48][49][50]

Doritos Quest

In 2008, Doritos debuted a mystery flavor known as "Quest," featuring a campaign of online puzzles and prizes to identify the Quest flavor. The flavor was later identified as Mountain Dew.[51]

FanDEWmonium

In October 2010, Mountain Dew announced a new promotion that was called "FanDEWmonium",[52] a Dewmocracy with eight diet semi-finalist flavors in which Diet Dew drinkers could go online and fill out a bracket style survey, indicating which top two flavors they would like to see later released in stores. Two variant flavors were current flavors that were introduced in diet form, four variant options were previously released flavors that were brought back in diet form, and two entirely new flavors and names were introduced: Diet Mountain Dew Flare (a berry citrus flavor) and Diet Mountain Dew Crave (a sweet and sour apple flavor). The two current flavors were Dewmocracy winners being introduced in diet form, Diet Mountain Dew White Out (a smooth citrus flavor) and Voltage (a raspberry-citrus flavor with a shot of ginseng for flavor enhancement), and the four returning flavors were Diet Mountain Dew Supernova (a strawberry-melon flavor), Distortion (a lime-citrus flavor), Typhoon (a strawberry-pineapple flavor), and Ultraviolet (a mixed berry flavor). Except for Ultraviolet (a former limited release flavor), the 3 other returning flavors were all previous Dewmocracy flavors that did not win. After many votes were cast, the finalists were diet versions of two of the three diet flavors that were newly introduced in the first DEWmocracy-Diet Voltage and Diet Supernova. The voting for these top two began March 6, 2011, when they were released in U.S. stores, pit stops, gas stations, and pharmacies for a limited duration of eight weeks.[53] Diet Mountain Dew Supernova was the eventual winner and thus, it became a permanent Diet Mountain Dew flavor. This new flavor of Diet Mountain Dew will be returning to stores full-time pending a further announcement that shall be outlining exact dates.

Back by Popular DEWmand

On January 7, 2011, Mountain Dew posted on their Facebook that Pitch Black would return to the shelves on May 2011. It stated that this may be the start of many re-releases of old favorites. The Company promoted Pitch Blacks return heavily with giveaways and contests. About a month before the planned release date, a photo was released on a Mountain Dew Company worker's Pongr, which showed Pitch Black and 2008's Supernova. Two weeks before the release, Dew Labs announced the return of 2010's Typhoon in 2-Liter bottles exclusively at Walmart Supercenters. It was officially stated by the official "Back By Popular DEWmand" Facebook page on July 25 that the promotion had ended. The promotional advertisements were then taken down from the official Mountain Dew website. On a later date, Mountain Dew then confirmed via tweet that there would not be any more flavors returning 'by Popular DEWmand' for now, as it was only intended to be a summer program. They also stated that there were currently no plans to re-release Revolution, but they also had the quote "never say never".

Flavors and varieties

Following the success of Code Red in 2001, over 30 subsequent flavors bearing the "Mountain Dew" name have been introduced, such as LiveWire, an orange-flavored variation, Pitch Black, a grape-flavored variation that was produced seasonally prior to Halloween, and Typhoon, a strawberry-pineapple flavored variation that came in second in DEWmocracy 2:Collective Intelligence. This is a table covering them all.

Eight flavors of Mountain Dew in a grocery store display cooler.
Mountain Dew Soda Flavors
Dates of production Notes Picture
Mountain Dew 1948 – Present The original flavor. A yellow-green-colored, lemon-citrus-flavored soda that was developed in the 1940s by Barney and Ally Hartman, who were beverage bottlers in Tennessee. A revised formula was created by Bill Bridgforth in the year 1958.
Caffeine-Free Mountain Dew 1976 – Present Non-caffeinated Mountain Dew. Available in various parts of the United States. In Canada and Australia, it is sold as regular Mountain Dew as neither country sell the original Mountain Dew. Caffeine free mountain dew.jpg
Diet Mountain Dew 1988 – Present A no-calorie Mountain Dew that was first introduced in 1988.[2] It was formerly known as “Sugar-Free Mountain Dew” until 1986, when it was given its current name. In 2006 Diet Mountain Dew was reformulated with a new “Tuned Up Taste”, using a blend of sucralose, aspartame, and acesulfame potassium as sweeteners. The previous formulation was sweetened exclusively with aspartame.[54] In limited areas in the United States, Diet Mountain Dew has treated water instead of carbonated water as a fountain drink.
Mountain Dew Red 1988 Simply known to be Fruit-flavored Mountain Dew, Red was the first Mountain Dew flavor variation, and was discontinued the same year it was released. Its legacy lives on as Mountain Dew Code Red, but the two are entirely different flavors.
Diet Mountain Dew Red 1988 Simply known to be a zero-calorie version of Mountain Dew Red. Like the original version, it was also discontinued in the same year it was introduced.
Caffeine-Free Diet Mountain Dew 1989 – Present A no-calorie, non-caffeinated Mountain Dew. Available in limited locations in the United States. In Canada it is simply labeled as “Diet Mountain Dew.”[55]
Mountain Dew Sport 1989–1991 Following initial test marketing in 1989, this Mountain Dew-flavored sports drink was released in a limited number of U.S. regions in 1990. A 2-calorie variant was released, as well as a Diet version. They were all short-lived, being discontinued in 1991.[56]
Diet Mountain Dew Sport 1989–1991 A zero-calorie version of Mountain Dew Sport. Like the original version, it was also discontinued in 1991.
Mountain Dew Code Red 2001 – Present A cherry-flavored Mountain Dew. Introduced in 2001, it was the first widely successful flavor extension; In its first year of production, Code Red increased overall sales of Mountain Dew by 6 percent.[57] It was later released in New Zealand in 2009.
Diet Mountain Dew Code Red 2002 – Present A no-calorie, no-sugar cherry-flavored Mountain Dew. Available in limited areas only, it was first introduced in late 2002.[58]
Mountain Dew LiveWire 2003 – Present An orange-colored, orange-flavored Mountain Dew. LiveWire was initially introduced in 2003 as a limited-edition flavor for the summer.[58] In 2005, after two years of limited summer releases, LiveWire became a permanent addition to the Mountain Dew product line.[59] It appears that LiveWire became region-specific in 2011, as many areas across the U.S. began noticing its disappearance from shelves. It was also released in New Zealand in 2011.
Mountain Dew Pitch Black 2004, 2011 A dark purple-colored, grape-flavored Mountain Dew released for the 2004 Halloween season.[60] Pitch Black was re-released in early May 2011 as a part of the "Back by popular DEWmand" promotion and stayed on shelves through July.[61] It was later released in New Zealand in 2011. Pitch black.jpg
Caffeine-Free Mountain Dew Pitch Black Halloween 2004 A dark purple-colored, grape-flavored Mountain Dew with no caffeine that was released for the 2004 Halloween season. Since its release in Halloween 2004, it was only available in Canada [1]
Mountain Dew Baja Blast 2004 – Present A sea green-colored, tropical lime-pineapple flavored Mountain Dew introduced in 2004, available exclusively as a fountain drink at Taco Bell restaurants. Beginning in January 2006, internet hoaxes began spreading, claiming that Baja Blast would be available in 20 oz. bottles and sold in stores. In 2011, however, videos began surfacing online of people finding this flavor in fountain drinks in convenience stores outside of Taco Bell restaurants, revealing that the drink was no longer exclusive Taco Bell exclusive. Beverage reviewers have noted a similarity in taste between the Mountain Dew Game Fuel Alliance Blue limited edition flavor and Baja Blast.[62]
Mountain Dew Pitch Black II 2005 A dark purple-colored, sour grape-flavored Mountain Dew, released as a limited edition flavor for Halloween in 2005. Referred to as the "sequel” to the original Pitch Black, which was released in 2004.[63] Mountain Dew Pitch Black 2.jpg
Mountain Dew Game Fuel 2007 A red-orange-colored, citrus-cherry-flavored Mountain Dew first released in August 2007 for a total of 12 weeks to promote the release of Halo 3, an Xbox 360 game. Two years later, this flavor saw a limited return to shelves promoting the MMORPG World of Warcraft. It was sold under the name "Mountain Dew Game Fuel Horde Red" with redesigned packaging and a new counterpart flavor. It was officially announced that this flavor would once again return to shelves to coincide with the upcoming game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. Its taste has been compared to "LiveWire", "Code Red" and the energy drink AMP Overdrive (another drink sold under the Mountain Dew brand name).[64]
Mountain Dew Supernova 2008, 2011 A magenta-colored, strawberry-melon-flavored Mountain Dew with ginseng.[65] One of the three “candidate flavor” finalists for DEWmocracy's “People’s Dew” national vote, it lost to Mountain Dew Voltage. It had held the least amount of votes until the end, when it ended up coming in 2nd place.[66] This flavor was re-released as a part of the "Back by popular DEWmand" promotion in early May 2011 and stayed on shelves through July.[61]
Mountain Dew Revolution 2008 A sky blue-colored, wild berry fruit-flavored Mountain Dew with a shot of ginseng for flavor enhancement.[67] One of the three “candidate flavor” finalists for DEWmocracy's “People’s Dew” national vote. Revolution held the majority amount of votes until the end of the promotion, when dropped to 3rd place and lost to Mountain Dew Voltage.[66] In 2011, The "Mountain Dew Throwback Shack" began to have a prize of "A Hidden Stash of Dew" which was then revealed to be glass bottles of Revolution with lab labels on them. Demand for Revolution has increased since Pitch Black, Typhoon, and Supernova were returning to shelves, but Mountain Dew said that there were currently no plans to rerelease Revolution.
Mountain Dew Voltage 2008 – Present A deep blue-colored, raspberry-citrus-flavored Mountain Dew with a shot of ginseng for flavor enhancement. Originally, this flavor was one of the three “candidate flavor” finalists for DEWmocracy's first “People’s Dew” national vote. It was released in stores on May 19, 2008 as a limited edition flavor so that people could taste test which flavor they like best before voting.[68] Voting ended on June 14 and it was announced on August 17, 2008 that Voltage was the final winner, and therefore, it became a permanent addition to the Mountain Dew family. It had 42% out of all votes and was officially released for sale on December 29, 2008.[66] It was later released in New Zealand in 2011 under the name "Electro Shock" and described as a "charge of wild berry flavor."
Mountain Dew Game Fuel Horde Red 2009 In 2009, the original "Game Fuel" flavor returned to shelves for 10 weeks under this name in connection with the World of Warcraft video game. The name and label design were updated to reflect the World of Warcraft theme.[69]
Mountain Dew Game Fuel Alliance Blue 2009 A blue-colored, wild fruit punch-flavored Mountain Dew flavor released alongside "Mountain Dew Game Fuel Horde Red" for a 10-week period in 2009. Like Horde Red, Alliance Blue was a promotional flavor for the video game World of Warcraft.[70]
Diet Mountain Dew Ultra Violet 2009–2010 A lavender-colored, mixed berry-flavored Mountain Dew. It was originally available for three months in 2009; and was the first Mountain Dew flavor available exclusively in Diet. It was released on August 3, 2009 at a first taste party in Brooklyn, New York. This flavor returned for the "FanDEWmonium" promotion, but ultimately lost to Diet Mountain Dew Supernova, coming in sixth place and not making it into the final round. Its flavor is sometimes compared to that of "Revolution" due to their berry-themed flavoring.[71]
Mountain Dew Throwback 2009 – Present A variation of Mountain Dew in the U.S. consisting of natural sugar in place of high fructose corn syrup, first released in a limited production run during the summer of 2009.[12] Mountain Dew Throwback has since been re-released for brief periods (generally 8–12 weeks at a time), including a 2nd wave from December 2009 - February 2010[13] and a 3rd wave in Summer/Fall 2010.[14] A fourth limited production run began in March 2011, lasting for a total of eight weeks before becoming a permanent addition.[15]
Mountain Dew Cherry Fusion 2009 – Present A red-colored, cherry-flavored fountain drink only available at Wienerschnitzel restaurants in the Western United States. It has a stronger cherry flavor in comparison to Code Red.[72][73]
Mountain Dew White Out 2010 – present A white-colored, smooth citrus-flavored Mountain Dew. Part of the second Mountain Dew "DEWmocracy: Collective Intelligence" promotion. It was released in stores on April 19 as a limited edition flavor so that people could taste test which flavor they like best before voting. Voting ended on June 14, and it was announced that White Out had won the campaign, so it became a permanent addition to the Mountain Dew family. It had 44% out of all votes and was officially for sale on October 4, 2010. It has been available in slurpee form since January 2011 and was later released in New Zealand in 2011.[74] Mountain dew whiteout.jpg
Mountain Dew Typhoon 2010, 2011 A red-orange-colored, strawberry-pineapple flavored Mountain Dew. Part of the second Mountain Dew "DEWmocracy: Collective Intelligence" promotion. It lost to Mountain Dew White Out and came in 2nd place with 40% of all votes. It was announced on April 15, 2011 that Typhoon would return in May 2011 as part of the "Back by Popular DEWmand" promotion and it stayed on shelves in 2-Liter bottles exclusively at Walmart Supercenters through July.[75]
Mountain Dew Distortion 2010 A dark green-colored, lime-flavored Mountain Dew. Part of the second Mountain Dew "DEWmocracy: Collective Intelligence" promotion. It lost to Mountain Dew White Out and came in 3rd place with only 16% out of all votes. Due to its similarity in color to the original Mountain Dew, Distortion was packaged in a clear bottle with a black label (as opposed to the green-plastic bottle with a green label used in the original Mountain Dew) in an attempt to avoid confusion.[76]
Diet Mountain Dew Typhoon 2011 A red-orange-colored, strawberry-pineapple-flavored Diet Mountain Dew. Part of "FanDEWmonium" promotion series of flavors but it lost to Diet Mountain Dew Supernova and came in fifth place, not making it to the final round.
Diet Mountain Dew Distortion 2011 A dark green-colored, lime-flavored Diet Mountain Dew. Part of "FanDEWmonium" promotion series of flavors but it lost to Diet Mountain Dew Supernova and came in eighth (last) place, not making it to the final round.
Diet Mountain Dew White Out 2011 A white-colored, smooth citrus-flavored Diet Mountain Dew. Part of "FanDEWmonium" promotion series of flavors but it lost to Diet Mountain Dew Supernova and came in third place, not making it to the final round. [2]
Diet Mountain Dew Flare 2011 A deep yellow-colored, berry-citrus-flavored Diet Mountain Dew. Part of "FanDEWmonium" promotion series of flavors but it lost to Diet Mountain Dew Supernova and came in fourth place, making it into the final round. [3]
Diet Mountain Dew Crave 2011 A light green-colored, sweet and sour apple-flavored Diet Mountain Dew. Part of "FanDEWmonium" promotion series of flavors but it lost to Diet Mountain Dew Supernova, coming in seventh place and not making it to the final round.
Diet Mountain Dew Voltage 2011 A deep blue-colored, raspberry-citrus-flavored Diet Mountain Dew with a "shot of ginseng" for flavor enhancement. This flavor was one of the "FanDEWmonium" promotion series of flavors [52] and made it to the finals with Diet Mountain Dew Supernova, meaning it had a limited release in U.S. stores while voting took place until Diet Supernova was revealed to be the winner.[53] It came in second in voting, against Diet Mountain Dew Supernova with 45% out of all votes. Diet mountain dew voltage.jpg
Diet Mountain Dew Supernova 2011–Present A magenta-colored, strawberry-melon-flavored Diet Mountain Dew with a "shot of ginseng" for flavor enhancement. This flavor began as one of the "FanDEWmonium" promotion series of flavors.[52] Diet Supernova was released in U.S. stores alongside Diet Mountain Dew Voltage on March 6, 2011 for a duration of eight weeks as a limited edition diet flavor so that people could taste test which flavor they preferred before voting.[53] It won FanDEWmonium with 55% out of all votes, and this flavor became a permanent addition to the Diet Mountain Dew flavor line-up.[77][78] It will be returning to stores full-time pending a further announcement that shall outline exact dates. Diet mountain dew supernova.jpg
Mountain Dew X-treme 2010 – Present A Grape-flavored Mountain Dew similar to "Pitch Black". It was released in Kuwait during December 2010 and has so far made its way into Saudi Arabia.[79]
Mountain Dew Grape 2011 – Present A deep purple-colored, Grape-flavored Mountain Dew. Since its introduction in mid-2011, it has only been available in Japan exclusively in Pepsi and Boss vending machines. It is only offered in 12 oz (340 g) cans and not available in stores in Japan. Its taste has often been compared to that of Grape flavored Jolly Rancher candies.
Mountain Dew Game Fuel Cherry-Citrus

(Call of Duty Edition)

October 2011 – Present The same red-orange-colored, cherry-citrus formula used for the original Game Fuel in 2007 and for Game Fuel Horde Red in 2009. For its 2011 release, its packaging will be redesigned to promote the video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. Though this drink's concept was leaked in early August 2011 by means of an eBay auction, it was officially announced on Mountain Dew Facebook page on August 24, 2011 and was officially released to US stores on October 10 that year. Mtn Dew Game Fuel Red.jpg
Mountain Dew Game Fuel Tropical

(Call of Duty Edition)

October 2011 – Present A dark green-colored, Tropical-flavored Mountain Dew flavor to coincide with the release of the video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. Like its counterpart, its concept was leaked in early August 2011 by means of an eBay auction, and was officially announced on Mountain Dew Facebook page on August 24, 2011 and was officially released to US stores on October 10 that year. It was originally tested by 500 Dew Labs members as a "Mystery" flavor, and was described by many to resemble the taste of "Baja Blast" and "Distortion".
Mountain Dew Slurpee & Energy Variations
Dates of production Notes Picture
Mountain Dew Blue Shock 2001 – present Berry-citrus flavored Mountain Dew.[80] Blue Shock was initially test-marketed in Chicago in can and bottle formats, but sales did not meet expectations and as a result, it was released in 2002 in the U.S. exclusively in Slurpee form at 7-Eleven stores. As of 2011, it remains listed as a current flavor according to 7-Eleven.[81] It was once available at select Marcus Theatres in Icee form.
Dew Fuel 2002–2007 A caffeinated version of Mountain Dew produced in Canada. Marketed as a natural health product and not as a soft drink, due to Health Canada regulations that only allow caffeine in 'dark-colored' varieties of soft drinks such as cola and root beer.[82] Originally called “Mountain Dew Energy” until given its present name in 2006. In early 2007, Pepsi-QTG Canada cited that Dew Fuel is out of production.[citation needed]
Dew Fuel Sugar Free 2002–2007 No-calorie Dew Fuel. The caffeinated version of Diet Mountain Dew offered in Canada. Was originally called “Mountain Dew Energy Sugar-Free” until 2006.[citation needed]
Darth Dew 2005 A limited production tangy grape flavored Mountain Dew Slurpee flavor.[83] It was available exclusively at 7-Eleven stores as part of a promotion for the theatrical release of Star Wars Episode III.[84] [4]
Mountain Dew MDX 2005–2007 A Mountain Dew-flavored energy soda introduced in 2005 in 14-US-fluid-ounce (410 ml) bottles.[85] In 2006 its packaging format was transitioned to 20-US-fluid-ounce (590 ml) bottles.[86] Its production was discontinued in 2007.
Mountain Dew Pitch Black Freeze 2006 A re-release of Pitch Black in Slurpee form produced as a limited edition flavor during the 2006 Halloween season.[87]
Mountain Dew Maximum Cream Slush 2004–2008 A frozen, no-sugar, no-carbonation fruit slush sold in participating 7-11 convenience stores.
Mountain Dew Arctic Burst 2006 A Mountain Dew Slurpee flavor available exclusively at 7-Eleven stores as part of a promotion for the theatrical release of Superman Returns. The Slurpee is blue in color and said to taste like blueberry. The official name was “Arctic Burst”.[88]
Mountain Dew Kryptonite Ice 2006 A Mountain Dew Slurpee flavor available exclusively at 7-Eleven stores as part of a promotion for the theatrical release of Superman Returns. The Slurpee is green in color and had a tropical, mango taste.
Sugar-Free Mountain Dew MDX 2005–2006 No-calorie Mountain Dew flavored energy soda which was short-lived, being discontinued one year after entering production in 2005.[89]
Dew Iced 2007–2008 A Mountain Dew flavored smoothie that was available exclusively at Cold Stone Creamery stores in 2007 and 2008.[90]
Mountain Dew Game Fuel (slurpee) August 2007 A red-orange colored, cherry citrus flavored slurpee that is available only at participating 7-11 convenience stores. Like the original version, it was introduced in August 2007 and was used to promote the Xbox 360 game "Halo 3". [5]
Mountain Dew Blue Shock Freeze 2008 – Present A blueberry Slurpee flavor only available at 7-Eleven stores.[81]
Mountain Dew Thin Ice Freeze 2009 – Present A blueberry-flavored Slurpee that is distributed only at 7-Eleven stores.[81]
Mountain Dew White Out Freeze 2011 – Present A smooth citrus, limited edition Slurpee flavor only available at 7-Eleven stores.
Mountain Dew Voltage Freeze 2011 – Present A deep-blue colored Slurpee that is distributed only at 7-Eleven stores. It has a raspberry-citrus flavor and a hint of ginseng for flavor enhancement.
Mountain Dew Coolata 2011 – Present In 2011, Dunkin' Donuts announced a new Mountain Dew-flavored Coolata
Mountain Dew Energy 2010 – present A new line of Mountain Dew released in the UK in June, 2010, originally in 500ml bottles, but as of February 2011 it has expanded to 440ml cans (Normal and sugar free) and 1 Litre bottles. Mountain Dew Energy was released in Ireland in April 2011. Produced in a lemon and lime flavor, it has a higher caffeine content as Mountain Dew sold in the U.S., at 18 mg per 100ml,[91] versus 91 mg per 20 fl oz in the U.S. version[92] (which is ~15.385 mg per 100ml). The UK version is produced with real sugar instead of high-fructose corn syrup, as with most other soft drinks in the UK. Mountain Dew did initially launch in the UK and the Republic of Ireland in 1996; however it was discontinued in 1998 due to low sales volumes at that time.[4] Mountain Dew Energy has been designed specifically for periods of mental and physical exertion, just like the original Mountain Dew distributed in the US. The high (compared to regular soft drinks) level of caffeine and sugar gives much the same "boost" as other caffeine-heavy energy drinks, making the drink particularly popular with 16-24 year olds. The drink is produced by Britvic in the UK. The original Mountain Dew is only available either from eBay, Amazon, Selfridges or other specialist importers such as Stateside Candy. MDE-Bottle-and-Can.jpg
Adrenaline Mountain Dew 2010 – present In August 2010, this new flavor was released to Poland and possibly other polish-speaking countries. Much like previous attempts, Adrenaline is marketed as a Mountain Dew energy drink, and contains things such as caffeine, taurine, guarana extract, ginseng, and vitamins B2 and B12. The drink is available in 250 ml cans, and also in an undetermined size of black-tinted bottles (similar to Mountain Dew Energy's green-tinted bottles). Because the drink is fairly recent and not available in English-speaking countries, not much is known of it as of yet.

See also

References

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  18. ^ officially stylized as DEWmocracy
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  92. ^ http://www.pepsicobeveragefacts.com/infobyproduct.php?prod_type=1026&prod_size=20&brand_fam_id=1049&brand_id=1000&product=Mountain+Dew PepsiCo beverage facts - Mtn Dew

External links

External audio
1968 Mountain Dew advert from the South African Springbok Radio preservation society (in Afrikaans).

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  • Mountain Dew — es un refresco cítrico fabricado por la compañía PepsiCo. En un principio se promocionó en 1948 sólo en el estado de Carolina del Norte en los EE.UU.; desde 1964 lo hizo en todos los EE.UU. Mountain Dew frecuentemente provoca la desaprobación de… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Mountain dew — Mountain Moun tain (moun t[i^]n), a. 1. Of or pertaining to a mountain or mountains; growing or living on a mountain; found on or peculiar to mountains; among mountains; as, a mountain torrent; mountain pines; mountain goats; mountain air;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mountain dew — n. 1. Obs. Scotch whiskey 2. Informal any whiskey, esp. when illegally distilled, as by mountaineers …   English World dictionary

  • Mountain Dew — Logo von Mountain Dew Mountain Dew (engl. „Bergtau“, ursprünglich ein irischer Euphemismus für „schwarzgebrannten Schnaps“[1][2]) ist eine Limonade der PepsiCo, die in Deutschland nur sehr wenig …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Mountain Dew — В этой статье не хватает ссылок на источники информации. Информация должна быть проверяема, иначе она может быть поставлена под сомнение и удалена. Вы можете отредактировать эту …   Википедия

  • Mountain Dew — es un refresco cítrico fabricado por la compañía PepsiCo. En un principio se promocionó en 1948 sólo en el estado de Carolina del Norte en los Estados Unidos; desde 1964 lo hizo en todo ese país. Mountain Dew es frecuentemente criticado por los… …   Wikipedia Español

  • mountain dew — 1. n. Scotch whiskey. □ Mountain dew is best when it’s from the old country. □ The real mountain dew is smoky tasting and amber. 2. n. illicit liquor; any liquor. □ Mountain dew is what I want. As long as it’s not store bought …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • Mountain Dew — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Mountain Dew est un film américain de Thomas N. Heffron sorti en 1917. Mountain Dew est une boisson. Catégorie : Homonymie …   Wikipédia en Français

  • mountain dew —    whisky    From the process of distillation and the place where it is done:     A greybeard jar of the real Glengillodram mountain dew. (Alexander, 1882) …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • mountain dew — moun′tain dew′ n. inf illegally distilled corn liquor; moonshine …   From formal English to slang


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