Money dance


Money dance
This article is about a cultural practice. For the accounting software, see Moneydance.

The money dance, dollar dance, or apron dance is an event at some wedding receptions in various cultures. During a money dance, male guests pay to dance briefly with the bride, and sometimes female guests pay to dance with the groom. The custom originated in Poland in the early 1900s in immigrant neighborhoods.

Sometimes guests are told that the money will be used for the bride and groom's honeymoon or to give them a little extra cash with which to set up housekeeping.

Contents

Europe

Poland

The money dance may have originated in Poland around the beginning of the 20th century. The dance takes place some time after the First dance, often once guests have had a chance to have a few drinks. The best man or MC or the disc jockey announces the event. Customarily, the best man begins dancing with the bride, pinning money onto her wedding gown or putting it into a purse, which she carries especially for the purpose, or into the pockets of an apron she dons over her gown especially for this dance. In a more contemporary version of this custom, the dance includes bridesmaids and other ladies who dance with the groom and pin money on his lapel. Each of the guests who dance with the bride or groom, respectively, takes only a few moments before another guest cuts in.

Ukraine

At Ukrainian weddings, the father of the bride usually begins pinning money on her dress. He is followed by the best man and groomsmen, and, finally, by the remainder of the male guests. Another variation is where the bride's veil is removed and given to the maid of honor and an apron is placed on the bride. Money is then placed into her apron during the dance.

Yugoslavia

At Yugoslavian weddings, instead of pinning the money on the bride's gown, the male guests give the money to the best man for safe keeping.

Hungary

At Hungarian and Portuguese weddings, the bride takes off her shoes and puts them in the middle of the dance floor. Then the shoes are passed around from guests to guest and each deposits a contribution.

North America

Mexico

Relatives take turns dancing up to the bride and groom and pinning money on their clothes, which allows the couple to spend a few moments with each of their guests. After the money dance, the groom is ridiculed by his friends, tossed in the air while being covered with the veil, and given an apron and broom.

United States

In America, practice of a money dance varies by geographic region and ethnic background of the families involved. It typically involves guests giving small sums of cash to the bride or pinning cash to her gown or veil. Even cultures that accept this may balk at paying the groom for his time and attention, so alternatives have developed, such as "paying" the groom with play money or a stick of chewing gum. Some consider this a way for the bride and groom to have face time with their guests. Many, including traditional North American etiquette experts, consider the practice incorrect.[1]

This has led to some couples calling it the honeymoon dance instead of a dollar dance or money dance. Some couples have even called it the dime dance and have put dimes under each person's plate or in a small bowl on each table so that guests won't feel obligated to 'pay' for a short dance with the bride or groom, while still giving them the opportunity to spend 30–60 seconds chatting and dancing with them.

The Philippines

At some Filipino weddings, the money dance is usually announced; males line up in front of the bride, pinning money on her dress or veil, then dance with her. Same with the male, only females line up instead. Money is pinned onto the new married couple's garments, representing the wish that good fortune is "rained" upon them, while also helping the couple financially as they begin their life together.

See also

  • Wedding traditions and customs

References

  1. ^ Martin, Judith; Jacobina Martin (2010). Miss Manners' Guide to a Surprisingly Dignified Wedding. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. pp. 62, 80–81, 273–274. ISBN 0-393-06914-1. 

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Dance Marathon at the University of Michigan — (also known as DMUM and formerly named University of Michigan Dance Marathon) is a philanthropic dance marathon held annually at the University of Michigan. It is one of the largest student organizations on campus and raises money for the C.S.… …   Wikipedia

  • Dance on Broadway — PAL Box art Developer(s) Longtail Studios AiLive Publisher(s) Ubisoft …   Wikipedia

  • Money, Money, Money — Single by ABBA from the album Arrival B side …   Wikipedia

  • Money (Pink Floyd song) — Money Single by Pink Floyd from the album The Dark Side of the Moon B side …   Wikipedia

  • Dance Dance Revolution Konamix — Developer(s) Konami Computer Entertainment Tokyo …   Wikipedia

  • Money Honey (Clyde McPhatter and The Drifters song) — Money Honey Single by Clyde McPhatter and The Drifters B side The Way I Feel[1] Released September 1953 Recorded …   Wikipedia

  • Money Jungle — Studio album by Duke Ellington with Charles Mingus and Max Roach Released February 1963 …   Wikipedia

  • Dance! Online — Developer(s) 9you Publisher(s) Acclaim Games Version Open Beta 2 Platform(s) …   Wikipedia

  • Dance Marathon at UCLA — Dance Marathon at UCLA, commonly referred to as DM, is a 26 hour dance marathon that takes place annually in February on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles, with the purpose of raising money for pediatric AIDS. The first… …   Wikipedia

  • Dance till Tomorrow — あさってDANCE (Asatte Dansu) Genre Romantic comedy Manga …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.