Athletic shoe


Athletic shoe

An athletic shoe is a generic name for footwear designed for sporting and physical activities, and is different in style and build than a dress shoe.

Athletic shoes, depending on the location and the actual type of footwear, can also go by the name "trainers" (British English), "sandshoes" or "joggers" (Australian English) "running shoes", "runners" or "gutties" (Canadian English, Australian English, Hiberno-English), "sneakers", "tennis shoes" (North American English, Australian English), "gym shoes", "tennies", "sport shoes", "sneaks", or "takkies" (South African English) and "rubber shoes" (Philippine English)

Use of athletic shoes

General purpose

Originally known as sporting apparel, today they are known as casual footwear.

Use in sports

The term "athletic shoes" is used for running in a marathon or half marathon, basketball, and tennis (amongst others) but tends to exclude shoes for sports played on grass such as football (soccer) and rugby, which are generally known as "boots", or in North America as cleats.

The shoes themselves are made of flexible material, typically featuring a sole made of dense rubber. While the original design was basic, manufacturers have since tailored athletic shoes for the different purposes that they can be used for. A specific example of this is the spiked shoe developed for track running. It is also a good idea to get your foot measured by a trained shoe specialist. Also, some come in leather

High-end marathon running shoes will often come in different shapes suited to different foot types, gait etc.

There are a variety of specialized shoes designed for specific uses:
* Racing flats
* Track shoe
* Skate shoes
* Climbing shoe
* Approach shoe
* Wrestling shoes
* Cleats
* Football boot

Etymology

The English English term "trainer" derives from "training shoe". There is evidence [http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/programmes/wordhunt/fashionistasextras.shtml] that this usage of "trainer" originated as a genericised tradename for a make of training shoe made in 1968 by Gola.

Plimsolls (English English) are indoor athletic shoes, and are also called "sneakers" in American English and Daps in Welsh English. The word "sneaker" is often attributed to Henry Nelson McKinney, an advertising agent for N. W. Ayer & Son, who, in 1917, coined the term because the rubber sole made the shoe stealthy. All other shoes, with the exception of moccasins, were unsuitable for sneaking due to the noise they inevitably produced. However, the word was in use at least as early as 1887, as the "Boston Journal of Education" made reference to "sneakers" as "the name boys give to tennis shoes".

Popular brands

Popular brands include Nike, Adidas, Etonic, FILA, Reebok, New Balance, Puma, Lacoste, K-Swiss, Gola, DC Shoes, Fred Perry, Converse, Vans, Pony, ASICS, Servis-Cheetah, Mizuno, G-Star Runnerz and Jordans.

Types of athletic shoes

* High-tops cover the ankle.
* Low-tops do not cover the ankle.
* Mid-cut are in-between high-tops and low-tops.
* Sneaker boots extend to the calf.

References

* [http://news.bbc.co.uk/sportacademy/hi/sa/athletics/features/newsid_3935000/3935703.stm BBC Sport — "The history of running shoes"]
* [http://visual.merriam-webster.com/clothing-articles/clothing/sportswear/running-shoe.php "running shoe" in the Visual Dictionary at Merriam-Webster.com]
* [http://www.drpribut.com/sports/sneaker_odyssey.html "2002: A Sneaker Odyssey"]
* Smith, Ian. "Do the Shoes Fit?" Time; 09/27/99, Vol. 154 Issue 13, p.111
* Globus, Sheila. "What's Your Athletic Shoe IQ?" Current Health 2; Sep2002, Vol. 29 Issue 1, p12
* [http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blshoe.htm "The History of Shoes"]

External links

* [http://www.podiatryworldwide.com Podiatry Worldwide Directory Homepage]


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