Sari


Sari

:"for the town in Nepal see Sari, Nepal"

A sari or saree or shari is a female garment in the Indian subcontinent.Alkazi, Roshan (1983) "Ancient Indian costume", Art Heritage; Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay); Boulanger, Chantal; (1997)] A sari is a strip of unstitched cloth, ranging from four to nine metres in length that is draped over the body in various styles. The most common style is for the sari to be wrapped around the waist, with one end then draped over the shoulder baring the midriff.Alkazi, Roshan (1983) "Ancient Indian costume", Art Heritage; Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay); Boulanger, Chantal; (1997)] The sari is usually worn over a petticoat ("pavada/pavadai" in the south, and "shaya" in eastern India), with a blouse known as a choli or ravika forming the upper garment. The choli has short sleeves and a low neck and is usually cropped, and as such is particularly well-suited for wear in the sultry South Asian summers. Cholis may be "backless" or of a halter neck style. These are usually more dressy with a lot of embellishments such as mirrors or embroidery and may be worn on special occasions. Women in the armed forces, when wearing a sari uniform, don a half-sleeve shirt tucked in at the waist.

Origins and history

The word 'sari' evolved from the Prakrit word 'sattika' as mentioned in earliest Buddhist Jain literature.Mohapatra, R. P. (1992) "Fashion styles of ancient India", B. R. Publishing corporation, ISBN 81-7018-723-0 ]

The history of Indian clothing trace the sari back to the Indus valley civilization, which flourished in 2800-1800 BCE in the Sindh and Punjab regions of what is now Pakistan.Alkazi, Roshan (1983) "Ancient Indian costume", Art Heritage; Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay); Boulanger, Chantal; (1997)] The earliest known depiction of the saree in the Indiain subcontinent is the statue of an Indus valley priest wearing a drape.Alkazi, Roshan (1983) "Ancient Indian costume", Art Heritage; Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay); Boulanger, Chantal; (1997)]

Ancient Tamil poetry, such as the "Silappadhikaram" and the "Kadambari" by Banabhatta, describes women in exquisite drapery or saree. Parthasarathy, R. (1993) The Tale of an Anklet: An Epic of South India – The Cilappatikaram of Ilanko Atikal, Translations from the Asian Classics, Columbia Univ. Press, New York, 1993.] In ancient Indian tradition and the Natya Shastra (an ancient Indian treatise describing ancient dance and costumes), the navel of the Supreme Being is considered to be the source of life and creativity, hence the midriff is to be left bare by the saree.Bharata (1967). The Natyashastra [Dramaturgy] , 2 vols., 2nd. ed. Trans. by Manomohan Ghosh. Calcutta: Manisha Granthalaya; Beck, Brenda. (1976) The Symbolic Merger of Body, Space, and Cosmos in Hindu Tamil Nadu. Contributions to Indian Sociology 10(2): 213-43. ]

Some costume historians believe that the men's dhoti, which is the oldest Indian draped garment, is the forerunner of the sari. They say that until the 14th century, the dhoti was worn by both men and women.Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay); Alkazi, Roshan (1983) "Ancient Indian costume", Art Heritage ]

Sculptures from the Gandhara, Mathura and Gupta schools (1st-6th century AD) show goddesses and dancers wearing what appears to be a dhoti wrap, in the "fishtail" version which covers the legs loosely and then flows into a long, decorative drape in front of the legs [http://www.pir.net/~beth/Saris/Fishtail/Fishtail.html] . No bodices are shown. Alkazi, Roshan (1983) "Ancient Indian costume", Art Heritage ]

Other sources say that everyday costume consisted of a dhoti or lungi (sarong), combined with a breast band and a veil or wrap that could be used to cover the upper body or head. The two-piece Kerala mundum neryathum (mundu, a dhoti or sarong, neryath, a shawl, in Malayalam) is a survival of ancient Indian clothing styles, the one-piece sari is a modern innovation, created by combining the two pieces of the mundum neryathum. Miller, Daniel & Banerjee, Mukulika; (2004) "The Sari", Lustre press / Roli books; Boulanger, C (1997) Saris: An Illustrated Guide to the Indian Art of Draping, Shakti Press International, New York. ISBN 0-9661496-1-0 ; Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay); ]

It is generally accepted that wrapped sari-like garments, shawls, and veils have been worn by Indian women for a long time, and that they have been worn in their current form for hundreds of years.

One point of particular controversy is the history of the choli, or sari blouse, and the petticoat. Some researchers state that these were unknown before the British arrived in India, and that they were introduced to satisfy Victorian ideas of modesty. Previously, women only wore one draped cloth and casually exposed the upper body and breasts. Other historians point to much textual and artistic evidence for various forms of breastband and upper-body shawl.

In South India, it is indeed documented that women from many communities wore only the sari and exposed the upper part of the body till the 20th century.Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay); Boulanger, Chantal; (1997) Saris: An Illustrated Guide to the Indian Art of Draping, Shakti Press International, New York.] Poetic references from works like Shilappadikaram indicate that during the sangam period in ancient South India, a single piece of clothing served as both lower garment and head covering, leaving the bosom and midriff completely uncovered. Parthasarathy, R. (1993) The Tale of an Anklet: An Epic of South India – The Cilappatikaram of Ilanko Atikal, Translations from the Asian Classics, Columbia Univ. Press, New York, 1993.] In Kerala there are many references to women being bare-breasted.Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay now known as Mumbai); Boulanger, Chantal; (1997) Saris: An Illustrated Guide to the Indian Art of Draping, Shakti Press International, New York.] including many pictures by Raja Ravi Varma. Even today, women in some rural areas do not wear cholis.

tyles of draping

The most common style is for the sari to be wrapped around the waist, with the loose end of the drape worn over the shoulder, baring the stomach.Alkazi, Roshan (1983) "Ancient Indian costume", Art Heritage; Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay); Boulanger, Chantal; (1997)] However, the sari can be draped in several different styles, though some styles do require a sari of a particular length or form. The French cultural anthropologist and sari researcher, Chantal Boulanger, categorizes sari drapes in the following families:Boulanger, Chantal; (1997) Saris: An Illustrated Guide to the Indian Art of Draping, Shakti Press International, New York.]
* Nivi – styles originally worn in Tamil Nadu; besides the modern nivi, there is also the "kaccha nivi", where the pleats are passed through the legs and tucked into the waist at the back. This allows free movement while covering the legs.
* Bengali and Oriya style.
* Gujarati – this style differs from the "nivi" only in the manner that the loose end is handled: in this style, the loose end is draped over the right shoulder rather than the left, and is also draped back-to-front rather than the other way around.
* Maharashtrian/Kache – This drape ( [http://www.cbmphoto.co.uk/photos/LAS45.jpgfront] and [http://www.cbmphoto.co.uk/photos/LAS49.jpgback] ) is very similar to that of the male Maharashtrian dhoti. The center of the sari (held lengthwise) is placed at the center back, the ends are brought forward and tied securely, then the two ends are wrapped around the legs. When worn as a sari, an extra-long cloth is used and the ends are then passed up over the shoulders and the upper body. They are primarily worn by Brahmin women of Maharashtra, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu.
* Dravidian – sari drapes worn in Tamil Nadu; many feature a "pinkosu", or pleated rosette, at the waist.
* "Madisaara" style – This drape is typical of Brahmin ladies from Tamil Nadu and Kerala
* Kodagu style – This drape is confined to ladies hailing from the Kodagu district of Karnataka. In this style, the pleats are created in the rear, instead of the front. The loose end of the sari is draped back-to-front over the right shoulder, and is pinned to the rest of the sari.
* Gond – sari styles found in many parts of Central India. The cloth is first draped over the left shoulder, then arranged to cover the body.

* the two-piece sari, or mundum neryathum, worn in Kerala. Usually made of unbleached cotton and decorated with gold or colored stripes and/or borders.
* tribal styles – often secured by tying them firmly across the chest, covering the breasts. The "nivi" style is today's most popular sari style. (Dongerkerry K. S. 1959).Dongerkerry, Kamala, S. (1959) The Indian sari. New Delhi.]

: The nivi drape starts with one end of the sari tucked into the waistband of the petticoat. The cloth is wrapped around the lower body once, then hand-gathered into even pleats just below the navel. The pleats are also tucked into the waistband of the petticoat.Dongerkerry, Kamala, S. (1959) The Indian sari. New Delhi.] They create a graceful, decorative effect which poets have likened to the petals of a flower.Dongerkerry, Kamala, S. (1959) The Indian sari. New Delhi.]

: After one more turn around the waist, the loose end is draped over the shoulder.Dongerkerry, Kamala, S. (1959) The Indian sari. New Delhi.] The loose end is called the pallu or pallav. It is draped diagonally in front of the torso. It is worn across the right hip to over the left shoulder, partly baring the midriff.Dongerkerry, Kamala, S. (1959) The Indian sari. New Delhi.] The navel can be revealed or concealed by the wearer by adjusting the pallu, depending on the social setting in which the sari is being worn. The long end of the pallu hanging from the back of the shoulder is often intricately decorated. The pallav may either be left hanging freely,tucked in at the waist, used to cover the head, or just used to cover the neck, by draping it across the right shoulder as well. Some nivi styles are worn with the pallu draped from the back towards the front.

The Nivi saree was popularised through the paintings of Raja Ravi Verma.Miller, Daniel & Banerjee, Mukulika; (2004) "The Sari", Lustre press / Roli books. ] by modifying the south indian saree called mundum neriyathum.In one of his painting the Indian subcontinent was shown as a mother wearing a flowing nivi saree.Miller, Daniel & Banerjee, Mukulika; (2004) "The Sari", Lustre press / Roli books. ]

In Pakistan

In Pakistan, the wearing of saris has declined as the more traditional shalwar kameez is generally preferred for everyday wear. The sari does however remain a popular dress for formal functions such as weddings.cite web|url = http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/IB23Df03.html| title = Bollywood, saris and a bombed train |publisher = Asia Times|accessdate = 2007-08-31] The sari is sometimes worn as daily-wear, mostly in Karachi, by those elderly women who were used to wearing it in pre-partition Indiacite web|url = http://www.hindu.com/mag/2004/10/24/stories/2004102400380300.htm| title = The spread of the salwar|publisher = The Hindu|accessdate = 2007-08-31] and by the some of the new generation who have re-introduced the interest of saris.cite web|url = http://living.oneindia.in/expressions/sari-craze.html| title = Buying saris-tempting hobby for women|publisher = One India|accessdate = 2007-08-31] cite web|url = http://www.himalmag.com/southasia_this_week/southasia_this_week_61.htm| title = Saris in Pakistan|accessdate = 2007-08-31] The reason why the sari lost popularity in Pakistan, was due to it being viewed as a Hindu dress. Although she was seen wearing them,cite web|url = http://www.hindu.com/mag/2004/10/24/stories/2004102400380300.htm| title = The spread of the salwar|publisher = The Hindu|accessdate = 2007-08-31] Fatima Jinnah, the "Mother of the Nation", called the sari "unpatriotic" and Pervez Musharraf's wife stated that she never wears them. [ cite web | title = Meanwhile: Unraveling the sari | publisher = International Herald Tribune | url=http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/04/27/opinion/eddatta.php] , although it is official dress code of Pakistan Army females.

In Sri Lanka

Sri Lankan women wear saris in many styles. However, two ways of draping the sari are popular and tend to dominate; the Indian style (classic nivi drape) and the Kandyan style (or 'osaria' in Sinhalese). The Kandyan style is generally more popular in the hill country region of Kandy from which the style gets its name. Though local preferences play a role, most women decide on style depending on personal preference or what is perceived to be most flattering for their figure.

The traditional Kandyan (Osaria) style consists of a full blouse which covers the midriff completely, and is partially tucked in at the front as is seen in this 19th century portrait. However, modern intermingling of styles has led to most wearers baring the midriff. The final tail of the sari is neatly pleated rather than free-flowing. This is rather similar to the pleated rosette used in the 'Dravidian' style noted earlier in the article.

In Nepal

In Nepal, a special style of draping is used in a saree called Haku patasi. The saree is draped around the waist and a shawl is worn covering upper half of saree which is used in place of "pallu".

The sari as cloth

Saris are woven with one plain end (the end that is concealed inside the wrap), two long decorative borders running the length of the sari, and a one to three foot section at the other end which continues and elaborates the length-wise decoration. This end is called the "pallu"; it is the part thrown over the shoulder in the Nivi style of draping.

In past times, saris were woven of silk or cotton. The rich could afford finely-woven, diaphanous silk saris that, according to folklore, could be passed through a finger ring. The poor wore coarsely woven cotton saris. All saris were handwoven and represented a considerable investment of time or money.

Simple hand-woven villagers' saris are often decorated with checks or stripes woven into the cloth. Inexpensive saris were also decorated with block printing using carved wooden blocks and vegetable dyes, or tie-dyeing, known in India as "bhandani" work.

More expensive saris had elaborate geometric, floral, or figurative ornament created on the loom, as part of the fabric. Sometimes warp and weft threads were tie-dyed and then woven, creating "ikat" patterns. Sometimes threads of different colors were woven into the base fabric in patterns; an ornamented border, an elaborate pallu, and often, small repeated accents in the cloth itself. These accents are called "buttis" or "bhutties" (spellings vary). For fancy saris, these patterns could be woven with gold or silver thread, which is called "zari" work.

Sometimes the saris were further decorated, after weaving, with various sorts of embroidery. "Resham" work is embroidery done with colored silk thread. Zardozi embroidery uses gold and silver thread and sometimes pearls and precious stones. Cheap modern versions of zardozi use synthetic metallic thread and imitation stones, such as fake pearls and Swarovski crystals.

In modern times, saris are increasingly woven on mechanical looms and made of artificial fibers, such as polyester, nylon, or rayon, which do not require starching or ironing. They are printed by machine, or woven in simple patterns made with "floats" across the back of the sari. This can create an elaborate appearance on the front, while looking ugly on the back. The punchra work is imitated with inexpensive machine-made tassel trim.

Hand-woven, hand-decorated saris are naturally much more expensive than the machine imitations. While the over-all market for handweaving has plummeted (leading to much distress among Indian handweavers), hand-woven saris are still popular for weddings and other grand social occasions.

Types of saris

While an international image of the 'modern style' sari may have been popularised by airline stewardesses, each region in the Indian subcontinent has developed, over the centuries, its own unique sari style. Following are the well known varieties, distinct on the basis of fabric, weaving style, or motif, in South Asia:

Northern styles

* Chikan – Lucknow
* Banarasi – Benares
** Tant
** Jamdani
** Tanchoi
** Shalu

Eastern styles

* Baluchari – West Bengal
* Kantha – West Bengal
* Ikat Silk & Cotton – Orissa
* Cuttacki Pata Silk & Cotton – Orissa
* Sambalpuri Pata Silk & cotton Saree – Orissa
* Bomkai Silk & Cotton – Orissa
* Mayurbhanj Tussar Silk – Orissa
* Sonepuri/Subarnapuri Silk – Orissa
* Bapta & Khandua Silk & Cotton – Orissa
* Berhampuri Silk – Orissa
* Tanta/Taant Cotton – Orissa,West Bengal & Bangladesh
* Jamdani – Bangladesh
* Jamdani Khulna – Bangladesh
* Dhakai Benarosi– Bangladesh
* Rajshahi Silk– Bangladesh
* Tangail Tanter Sari– Bangladesh
* Katan Sari– Bangladesh

Western styles

* Paithani – Maharashtra
* Bandhani – Gujarat and Rajasthan
* Kota doria Rajasthan
* Lugade – Maharashtra

Central styles

* Chanderi – Madhya Pradesh
* Maheshwari – Madhya Pradesh

outhern styles

* Kanchipuram (locally called Kanjivaram) – Tamil Nadu
* Coimbatore – Tamil Nadu
* Chinnalapatti – Tamil Nadu
* Chettinad – Tamil Nadu
* Madurai – Tamil Nadu
* Pochampally Andhra Pradesh
* Venkatagiri – Andhra Pradesh
* Gadwal – Andhra Pradesh
* Guntur – Andhra Pradesh
* Narayanpet – Andhra Pradesh
* Mangalagiri – Andhra Pradesh
* Balarampuram – Kerala
* Mysore Silk – Karnataka
* Ilkal saree
* Valkalam saree

ee also

* Achkan
* Dhoti
* Lungi
* Choli
* Indian dress
* Salwar kameez
* Churidar and Kurta
* Ghagra
* Lehenga
* Dupatta

Notes

References and bibliography

* Alkazi, Roshan (1983) "Ancient Indian costume", Art Heritage
* Ambrose, Kay (1950) Classical Dances and Costumes of India. A. & C. Black, London.
* Beck, Brenda. (1976) The Symbolic Merger of Body, Space, and Cosmos in Hindu Tamil Nadu. Contributions to Indian Sociology 10(2): 213-43.
* Bharata (1967). The Natyashastra [Dramaturgy] , 2 vols., 2nd. ed. Trans. by Manomohan Ghosh. Calcutta: Manisha Granthalaya.
* Boulanger, Chantal; (1997) Saris: An Illustrated Guide to the Indian Art of Draping, Shakti Press International, New York.
* Craddock, Norma. (1994). Anthills, Split Mothers, and Sacrifice: Conceptions of Female Power in the Mariyamman Tradition. Dissertation, U. of California, Berkeley.
* Dongerkerry, Kamala, S. (1959) The Indian sari. New Delhi.
* Ghurye (1951) "Indian costume", Popular book depot (Bombay); (Includes rare photographs of 19th century Namboothiri and nair women in ancient saree with bare upper torso).
* Miller, Daniel & Banerjee, Mukulika; (2004) "The Sari", Lustre press / Roli books
* Mohapatra, R. P. (1992) "Fashion styles of ancient India", B. R. Publishing corporation, ISBN 81-7018-723-0
* Parthasarathy, R. (1993) The Tale of an Anklet: An Epic of South India – The Cilappatikaram of Ilanko Atikal, Translations from the Asian Classics, Columbia Univ. Press, New York, 1993.

External links

* [http://lifestyle.iloveindia.com/lounge/banarasi-sari-285.html Banarasi Sari] Making & History
* [http://www.kanjeevaram.com Kanjeevaram Sari] All about Kanjivaram Sarees
* [http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/mag/2004/10/24/stories/2004102400380300.htm Sari vs. salwar kameez on the subcontinent]
* [http://www.dailynews.lk/2005/03/12/fea07.htm Indian sari falls from grace as urban women adopt Western styles]
* [http://anjana.homeip.net/Pages/Personal-pages/Saree.html How to tie a Madisaar]
** [http://www.ethnictours.co.za/images/sari-instructions.jpgNivi] ; [http://www.sarisafari.com/howkappulu.html Kappula] ; [http://www.sarisafari.com/howmundu.html Mundu] ; [http://www.sarisafari.com/howkaccha.html Kaccha] ; [http://www.sarisafari.com/howbengali.html Bengali]


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