Reform

Reform

:"For other uses see Reform (disambiguation)"

Reform means beneficial change, or sometimes, more specifically, reversion to a pure original state.

Reform is generally distinguished from revolution. The latter means basic or radical change; whereas reform may be no more than fine tuning, or at most redressing serious wrongs without altering the fundamentals of the system. Reform seeks to improve the system as it stands, never to overthrow it wholesale.

During the Philadelphia Convention of 1787, for example, the New Jersey Plan would have "reformed" the existing constitution, the Articles of Confederation. By contrast, the Virginia Plan proposed to completely rewrite the nation's fundamental charter, and create a new constitution. Virginia's more "revolutionary" approach prevailed and resulted in the U.S. Constitution.

Likewise today, many reforms are proposed in the United States Congress which aim to improve the system. For example, campaign finance reform would modify the way elections in the United States are financed, but would not change the basic nature of the offices at stake. Rotation in office or term limits would, by contrast, be more revolutionary, in altering basic political connections between incumbents and constituents. [On term limits reform see, [http://www.ustl.org/index.html U.S. Term Limits] . On more radical/revolutionary changes, including term limits, see, for example, Robert Struble, Jr., [http://www.tell-usa.org "Treatise on Twelve Lights: To Restore America the Beautiful under God and the Written Constitution,"] 2007-08 edition.]

The UK government frequently uses the term "reform" to describe changes to public services, such as the National Health Service. However, these changes are not universally accepted as beneficial [ [http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7366653.stm BBC NEWS | Health | Junior doctors attack NHS reforms ] ] .

Re-form

A note about grammar: when used to describe something which is "physically" formed again, such as re-casting it in a mold/mould, or a band that gets back together, the proper term is re-form (with a hyphen), not "reform".

References


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  • Reform — Reform …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • reform — re·form /ri fȯrm/ vt 1: to put (a writing) into a corrected form that more accurately reflects the agreement of the parties allows a writing signed by mistake to be reform ed W. M. McGovern, Jr. et al. compare ratify 2: to induce or c …   Law dictionary

  • Reform — (lat. für re zurück; formatio: Gestaltung, Wiederherstellung) bezeichnet in der Politik eine größere, planvolle und gewaltlose Umgestaltung bestehender Verhältnisse und Systeme. Das Wort erscheint schon in den Paulus Briefen der Bibel, später… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Reform — Re*form , n. [F. r[ e]forme.] Amendment of what is defective, vicious, corrupt, or depraved; reformation; as, reform of elections; reform of government. [1913 Webster] {Civil service reform}. See under {Civil}. {Reform acts} (Eng. Politics), acts …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reform — Re*form (r?*f?rm ), v. t. [F. r[ e]former, L. reformare; pref. re re + formare to form, from forma form. See {Form}.] To put into a new and improved form or condition; to restore to a former good state, or bring from bad to good; to change from… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reform — Reform, AL U.S. city in Alabama Population (2000): 1978 Housing Units (2000): 925 Land area (2000): 8.042385 sq. miles (20.829681 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.028421 sq. miles (0.073611 sq. km) Total area (2000): 8.070806 sq. miles (20.903292 sq …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Reform, AL — U.S. city in Alabama Population (2000): 1978 Housing Units (2000): 925 Land area (2000): 8.042385 sq. miles (20.829681 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.028421 sq. miles (0.073611 sq. km) Total area (2000): 8.070806 sq. miles (20.903292 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Reform — Re*form , v. i. To return to a good state; to amend or correct one s own character or habits; as, a man of settled habits of vice will seldom reform. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reform. — reform. = reformiert. * * * reform. = reformiert …   Universal-Lexikon

  • reform — vb *correct, rectify, emend, amend, remedy, redress, revise Analogous words: *mend, repair, rebuild: better, *improve, help, ameliorate reform n *reformation …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • reform — The verb reform (with the stress on the second syllable) means ‘to improve by removing faults’. Re form (with hyphen) means ‘to form again’ …   Modern English usage


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