Stanley Argyle


Stanley Argyle

Infobox_Premier
honorific-prefix=The Honourable
name =Sir Stanley Argyle
honorific-suffix=
KBE
nationality =Australian
order =32nd Premier of Victoria
term_start =19 May 1932
term_end =2 April 1935
predecessor =Edmond Hogan
successor =Albert Dunstan
deputy =


caption =
birth_date =4 December 1867
birth_place =Kyneton, Victoria, Australia
death_date =death date and age|1940|11|23|1867|12|4|df=y
death_place =Toorak, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
constituency =
party =
spouse =Violet Ellen Jessie Lewis
profession =
religion =


footnotes =

Sir Stanley Seymour Argyle KBE (4 December 1867–23 November 1940), Australian politician, was the 32nd Premier of Victoria. He was born in Kyneton, Victoria, the son of a grazier, and was educated at Brighton Grammar School and the University of Melbourne, where he graduated in medicine. After further study in the United Kingdom, he went into general practice in Kew (a wealthy Melbourne suburb), and was later a pioneer of radiology in Australia. He was a member of the Kew City Council 1898-1905 and was mayor in 1903-05. During World War I he was consultant radiologist to the Australian Imperial Force in Egypt and in France, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. After the war he invested in dairy farming, milk processing and citrus growing.

Argyle was elected to the Victorian Legislative Assembly for the seat of Toorak in 1920, as an independent Nationalist. He was Chief Secretary and Minister for Health in the ministries of Harry Lawson, John Allan, Alexander Peacock and William McPherson between 1923 and 1928. When McPherson resigned as leader of the Nationalist Party, Argyle was chosen to succeed him, and in 1931 the party was renamed the United Australia Party (UAP). He led the opposition to Ned Hogan's minority Australian Labor Party government, which was unable to cope with the effects of the Great Depression and was heavily defeated at the May 1932 elections.

Argyle formed a coalition government with the Country Party, led by Allan and later by Albert Dunstan. The government had a huge majority — 45 seats to Labor's 16. Ministers included the rising star of the UAP, Robert Menzies, who became Attorney-General and Minister for Railways. Argyle, a firm fiscal conservative, held to the orthodox view that in a time of depression government spending must be cut so that the budget remained in balance. This soon brought him into conflict with both the trade unions and the farmers, but at the time there seemed to be no alternative policy. Argyle was lucky in that the economy began to improve from 1932, and the unemployment rate fell from 27 percent in 1932 to 20 percent in 1934 and 14 percent in 1935. This led a reduction in unemployment relief payments and an increase in taxation revenue, easing the state's financial crisis.

Argyle fought the March 1935 election with an improving economy, a record of sound, if unimaginative, management, and with the Labor opposition still divided and demoralised. He was rewarded with a second comfortable majority, with the UAP winning 25 seats and the Country Party 20, while Labor won only 17. But at this point he was unexpectedly betrayed by his allies. The Country Party leader Albert Dunstan was a close friend of the gambling boss John Wren, who was also very close to the Labor leader Thomas Tunnecliffe (in the view of most historians, in fact, Tunnecliffe was under Wren's control). Wren, aided by the Victorian Labor Party President, Arthur Calwell, persuaded Dunstan to break off the coalition with Argyle and form a minority Country Party government, which Labor would support in return for some policy concessions. Dunstan agreed to this deal, and in April 1935 he moved a successful no confidence vote in the government from which he had just resigned.

The UAP (and later its successor the Liberal Party) never forgave the Country Party for this treachery. Henry Bolte, later Victoria's longest-serving Premier, was 27 in 1935, and Dunstan's betrayal of Argyle lay behind his lifelong and intense dislike of the Country Party, whom he called "political prostitutes." Argyle remained in politics as Leader of the Opposition until his death in 1940.

References

*Geoff Browne, "A Biographical Register of the Victorian Parliament, 1900-84", Government Printer, Melbourne, 1985
*Don Garden, "Victoria: A History", Thomas Nelson, Melbourne, 1984
*Kate White, "John Cain and Victorian Labour 1917-1957", Hale and Iremonger, Sydney, 1982
*Raymond Wright, "A People's Counsel. A History of the Parliament of Victoria, 1856-1990", Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1992


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Argyle — is an archaic spelling of Argyll, now part of the Argyll and Bute council area in western Scotland. As a result, the name Argyle has also been used by Scottish emigrants as the name of several locations. It is also found with some other… …   Wikipedia

  • Argyle, New York — Argyle Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Argyle peut faire référence à : Toponymie : en Écosse : une orthographe archaique de Argyll, au Canada Argyle, une localité du comté …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Argyle, Wisconsin — Argyle Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Argyle peut faire référence à : Toponymie : en Écosse : une orthographe archaique de Argyll, au Canada Argyle, une localité du comté …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Argyle (New York) — Argyle Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Argyle peut faire référence à : Toponymie : en Écosse : une orthographe archaique de Argyll, au Canada Argyle, une localité du comté …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Argyle (Wisconsin) — Argyle Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Argyle peut faire référence à : Toponymie : en Écosse : une orthographe archaique de Argyll, au Canada Argyle, une localité du comté …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Argyle — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Argyle peut faire référence à : Toponymie : en Écosse : une orthographe archaique de Argyll, au Canada Argyle, une localité du comté de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • ARGYLE, Sir Stanley Seymour (1867-1940) — premier of Victoria son of Edward Argyle, was born at Kyneton, Victoria, on 4 December 1867. He was educated at Hawthorn and Brighton Grammar Schools and the university of Melbourne, where he graduated M.B., B.S. in 1891. He also studied in Great …   Dictionary of Australian Biography

  • Argyle — I. /ˈagaɪl/ (say ahguyl) noun Sir Stanley Seymour, 1867–1940, Australian radiologist and Nationalist Party politician; premier of Victoria 1932–35. II. /ˈagaɪl/ (say ahguyl) noun Lake, a major reservoir about 40 km south of Kununurra, in WA;… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Plymouth Argyle F.C. — Plymouth Argyle Full name Plymouth Argyle Football Club Nickname(s) The Pilgrims …   Wikipedia

  • Plymouth Argyle Football Club — Infobox club sportif Plymouth Argyle FC …   Wikipédia en Français


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.