General Roman Calendar as in 1954


General Roman Calendar as in 1954

The following is a list of the feast days of the General Roman Calendar as it was in 1954. It thus incorporates changes that were made by Pope Pius XI (1922-1939), such as the institution of the Feast of Christ the King, but not those made in 1955 by Pope Pius XII (1939-1958).

The changes that the latter Pope made are indicated in General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII. They included the institution of two feasts in May: St. Joseph the Workman was added on May 1 as a Double of the I Class, requiring the transfer of Ss. Philip and James to May 11, and involving also the suppression of the Solemnity of Saint Joseph, which for just over a century had been celebrated on the second Wednesday after the Octave of Easter; the Feast of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Queen, was added on May 31 as a Double of the II Class, transferring St. Angela Merici, but not the commemoration of St. Petronilla, to June 1. All the Octaves except those of Easter, Pentecost, and Christmas were also suppressed.

Five years later, Pope John XXIII made a further revision with the "motu proprio" [http://www.ecclesiacatholica.com/missale%20romanum/motu%20proprio%20rubricarum%20instructum.htm "Rubricarum instructum"] of July 23 1960. This revision, the General Roman Calendar of 1962, was incorporated in the Roman Missal of 1962, [pages XLV-LIII of the reproduction on [http://www.musicasacra.com/pdf/missale62.pdf this Internet site] ] which was issued as implementation of this "motu proprio" [Decree placed at the beginning of the 1962 Missal] The 1962 calendar is thus the calendar approved by Pope Benedict XVI with his July 7 2007 document "Summorum Pontificum" for use as an extraordinary form of the Roman Rite.

The General Roman Calendar was again revised in 1969. For this revision and the later addition of celebrations of saints such as Martin de Porres, Maximilian Kolbe and Pio of Pietrelcina, see Roman Catholic calendar of saints.

For most of the celebrations here listed, the Mass is found in the section of the Roman Missal called the "Proper of the Saints", but for those occurring from 24 December to 13 January it is found in the "Proper of the Season", as these days do not move with respect to the seasons of the Church year.

Rank of Feast Days

The ranking of feast days that had grown from an original division between doubles and simples [http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03158a.htm Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. "Christian Calendar"] ] and that by the time of the Tridentine Calendar included semidoubles, with Pope Clement VIII adding in 1604 to the distinction between first and second class doubles the new rank of greater double, was still in use in the 1954 calendar, and would continue until the following year, 1955, when Pope Pius XII abolished the rank of semidouble.

The rank of feast days determines which Mass is to be said when two feast days coincide (or "occur") on the one day, as well as when a feast day falls on Sundays or certain other privileged days. Feast days were classified as Simple, Semidouble, or Double, with feast days of the Double Rite further divided into "Double of the I Class", "Double of the II Class", "Greater Double" or "Major Double", and "Double", in order of descending rank. On ferias and many feast days of simple rank, the celebrant was permitted to substitute a Mass of his own choice such as a votive Mass, or a Mass for the Dead.

What the original meaning of the term "double" may have been is not entirely certain. Some think that the greater festivals were thus styled because the antiphons before and after the psalms were "doubled", i.e. twice repeated entire on these days. Others, with more probability, point to the fact that before the ninth century in certain places, for example at Rome, it was customary on the greater feast days to recite two sets of Matins, the one of the feria or week-day, the other of the festival. Hence such days were known as "doubles".

The Catholic Encyclopedia of the early years of the twentieth century shows the incremental crowding of the calendar (which had increased further by 1954) in the following table based on the official revisions of the Roman Breviary in 1568, [For more information on this calendar of Pope Saint Pius V, see Tridentine Calendar.] 1662, 1631, 1882 and on the situation in 1907.

In 1907, when, in accordance with the rules in force since the time of Pope Pius V, feast days of any form of double, if impeded by "occurrence" (falling on the same day) [ [http://home.newadvent.org/cathen/11200a.htm Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. Occurrence (in liturgy)] ] with a feast day of higher class, were transferred to another day, this classification of feast days was of great practical importance for deciding which feast day to celebrate on any particular day. Pope Pius X simplified matters considerably in his 1911 reform of the Roman Breviary. In the case of occurrence the lower-ranking feast day could become a commemoration within the celebration of the higher-ranking one. Further retouches were made by Pope Pius XII in 1955, [General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII] Pope John XXIII in 1962, [General Roman Calendar of 1962] and Pope Paul VI in 1969. [Roman Catholic calendar of saints]

undays

Sundays were divided into greater and lesser Sundays, with the greater Sundays being further divided into two classes. The Greater Sundays of the I class were the I Sunday of Advent, the four Sundays of Lent, Passion Sunday, Palm Sunday, Easter Sunday, Low Sunday, and Pentecost. No feast day whatsoever could be celebrated on these days, although they admitted commemorations except on Easter and Pentecost. Greater Sundays of the II class permitted the celebration of Doubles of the I Class only, and consisted of the other three Sundays in Advent and the three pre-Lenten Sundays. All other Sundays (II to V after Easter and the Sundays after Epiphany and Pentecost, except for those which might occur during an Octave, which followed the rules for the Octave), were lesser Sundays or Sundays "per annum" ("through the year"), and only the celebration of Doubles of the I or II Class, or a feast of the Lord, took precedence over them. The Sunday within the Octave of the Nativity was a special case, due to the fixed date of Christmas and the high rank of the feast days following it. If December 29, 30, or 31 were a Sunday, it fell on that day, otherwise, it was transferred to December 30.

Before the reform of Pope St Pius X in 1911, ordinary Doubles took precedence over most of the Semidouble Sundays, resulting in many of the Sunday Masses rarely being said. While retaining the Semidouble rite for Sundays, the reform permitted only the most important feast days, Doubles of the I or II class, to be celebrated on Sunday, although commemorations were still made of lesser feast days until the reform of 1960. In addition, many feast days had been assigned to particular Sundays; following the reform, only three remained: the feast days of the Holy Name, the Holy Family, and the Most Holy Trinity. A fourth, Christ the King, was added in 1925.

Ferias

Ferias were also divided into three classes:

* Greater privileged ferias: Ash Wednesday and Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of Holy Week. No feast day could be celebrated on these days.
* Greater non-privileged ferias: The ferias of Advent, Lent, and Passion Week, Rogation Monday, and the Ember Days. Any feast day except a Simple could occur on these days, with a commemoration of the feria.
* All other ferias formed a third class, on which any feast day could be celebrated, and which were not commemorated.

Ember days are four separate sets of three days within the same week — specifically, the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday — roughly equidistant in the circuit of the year, that were formerly set aside for fasting and prayer. These days set apart for special prayer and fasting were considered especially suitable for the ordination of clergy. The Ember Days are known in Latin as "quatuor tempora" (the "four seasons"), or "jejunia quatuor temporum" ("fasts of the four seasons"). They occur in the weeks between the third and fourth Sundays of Advent, between the first and second Sundays of Lent, between Pentecost and Trinity Sunday, and beginning the first Wednesday after the Exaltation of the Holy Cross (September 14), which is between the liturgical third and fourth Sundays of September. [The rubrics of the Breviary defined the liturgical first Sunday of August, September, October and November, which primarily determined which books of Scripture were read during that week at Matins, as the Sunday closest to the first day of the month, in this manner: "That which is called the I Sunday of the month, is that which is on the Kalends, or nearest the Kalends of that month: so that, if the Kalends be Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday, then the I Sunday of the month, on which the book of Scripture to be begun is placed, is that which precedes the Kalends. But if Thursday or Friday, or Saturday, it is that which follows." The first Sunday of September, therefore, could fall between 29 August and 4 September. The 1962 reforms changed this to the actual first Sunday of the month, which also adjusted the possible dates of the September Ember Days.]

Rogation Days are, in the calendar of the Western Church, four days traditionally set apart for solemn processions to invoke God's mercy. They are April 25, the Major Rogation (or Greater Litanies), coinciding with St. Mark's Day (but transferred to the following Tuesday if they fell on Easter); and the three days preceding Ascension Thursday, the Minor Rogations (or Lesser Litanies). These are indicated below in the main body of the calendar and in the Movable Feasts section.

Vigils

In the Tridentine Calendar the vigils of Christmas, the Epiphany, and Pentecost were called "major vigils"; the rest were "minor" or "common" vigils [http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05647a.htm Catholic Encyclopedia: Eve of a Feast] ] In early times, every feast day had a vigil, but the increase in the number of feast days and abuses connected with the evening and night service of which the vigils originally consisted, led to their diminishment. Nevertheless, the Roman Rite kept many more vigils than other Latin liturgical rites such as the Ambrosian Rite and the Mozarabic Rite. If a Vigil fell on a Sunday, it was transferred to the previous Saturday.

Prior to the suppression of some vigils by Pope Pius XII in 1955, there were three classes of Vigils. The Vigils of Christmas and Pentecost were of the I class, and took precedence over any feast day. The Vigil of Epiphany was of the II class, and permitted only Doubles of the I or II classes, or any feast of the Lord. All other vigils were "common" and took precedence only over ferias and Simple feast days, but were anticipated on Saturday if they fell on Sunday. Most feasts of the Apostles had Vigils; the exceptions being those which fell in Eastertide, when Vigils were not permitted. The Vigil of St. Matthias was unique, in that it was normally commemorated on February 23, the feast day of St. Peter Damian, but in leap year, was kept on February 24, the traditional leap day of the Roman calendar.

Octaves

The Tridentine Calendar had many octaves, without any indication in the calendar itself of distinction of rank between them, apart from the fact that the Octave Day (the final day of the octave) was ranked higher than the days within the octave. Several octaves overlapped, so that, for instance, on 27 December the prayer of the saint of the day, Saint Thomas Becket, was followed by the prayers of Christmas, of Saint Stephen, of Saint John the Evangelist and of the Holy Innocents. The situation remained such until the reform of Pope Pius X. [See, for instance, [http://books.google.com/books?vid=LCCN33036844&id=E7sPAAAAIAAJ&pg=PP34&lpg=PP34&dq=missale+romanum&as_brr=1#PPP3,M1 "Missale Romanum", published by Pustet in 1862] ]

To cut down on the monotony of repeating the same prayers in Mass and Office every day for eight days, Pope Pius X classified the octaves as "privileged", "common" or "simple"

The privileged octaves were of three "ranks" ["Ordo" in Latin, not "classis" (class), the word used for feast days, the word that was also used in Pope John XXIII's revision of the rubrics for all kinds of liturgical days.] . The first rank belonged to Easter and Pentecost (permitting no feast day to be celebrated during them, nor even to be commemorated until Vespers on Tuesday), the second to Epiphany and Corpus Christi (the Octave Day ranked as a Greater Double, the days within the octave as Semidoubles, giving way only to Doubles of the I Class, and on the Octave day itself only to a Double of the I class which was celebrated in the entire Church), the third rank to Christmas, the Ascension, and the Sacred Heart (these gave way to any feast day above the level of Simple).

The common octaves were those of the Immaculate Conception, the Assumption, the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist, the Solemnity of St. Joseph, Saints Peter and Paul, and All Saints, as well as, locally, the principal patron saint of a church, cathedral, order, town, diocese, province, or nation. These too gave way to any feast day above the level of Simple; the difference between these and the third privileged rank was that ferial Psalms were said during common Octaves, while the Psalms from the feast day were used during privileged Octaves.

The simple octaves were those of Saint Stephen, Saint John the Evangelist, the Holy Innocents, Saint Lawrence, the Nativity of Mary and, locally, secondary patrons. These were all Doubles of the II class, their Octave day was a Simple and, in contrast to the situation before Pope Pius X, their Mass was not repeated nor a Commemoration made, except on the Octave day, as simple Octaves had no days within the Octave.

In Pope Pius XII's reform, only the octaves of Christmas, Easter and Pentecost were kept. [De rubricis, 11] The days within the Easter and Pentecost octaves were raised to double rite, had precedence over all feast days, and did not admit commemorations. [De rubricis, 12]

January

*January 1: Circumcision of the Lord and Octave of the Nativity, Double of the II Class.
*January 2: Octave of St. Stephen Protomartyr, Simple.
*January 3: Octave of St. John Apostle and Evangelist, Simple.
*January 4: Octave of the Holy Innocents Martyrs, Simple.
*January 5: Vigil of the Epiphany, Semidouble, Com. of St. Telesphorus Pope and Martyr.
*January 6: Epiphany of the Lord, Double of the I Class with a privileged Octave of the II rank.
*January 7: Of the II day within the Octave of the Epiphany, Semidouble.
*January 8: Of the III day within the Octave of the Epiphany, Semidouble.
*January 9: Of the IV day within the Octave of the Epiphany, Semidouble.
*January 10: Of the V day within the Octave of the Epiphany, Semidouble.
*January 11: Of the VI day within the Octave of the Epiphany, Semidouble, Com. of St. Hyginus Pope and Martyr.
*January 12: Of the VII day within the Octave of the Epiphany, Semidouble.
*January 13: Octave of the Epiphany, Greater Double.
*January 14: St. Hilary Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double, Com. of St. Felix Priest and Martyr.
*January 15: St. Paul first hermit, Confessor, Semidouble, Com. of St. Maurus.
*January 16: St. Marcellus I Pope and Martyr, Semidouble.
*January 17: St. Anthony, Double.
*January 18: Chair of St. Peter Apostle at Rome, Greater Double, Com. of St. Paul Apostle, and of St. Prisca Virgin and Martyr.
*January 19: Ss. Marius, Martha, Audifax, and Abachum Martyrs, Simple, Com. of St. Canute, Martyr.
*January 20: Ss. Fabian Pope and Sebastian Martyrs, Double.
*January 21: St. Agnes, Roman Virgin and Martyr, Double
*January 22: Ss. Vincent and Anastasius Martyrs, Semidouble.
*January 23: St. Raymund of Peñafort Confessor, Semidouble, Com. of St. Emerentiana Virgin and Martyr.
*January 24: St. Timothy Bishop and Martyr, Double.
*January 25: Conversion of St. Paul Apostle, Greater Double, Com. of St. Peter.
*January 26: St. Polycarp Bishop and Martyr, Double.
*January 27: St. John Chrysostom Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*January 28: St. Peter Nolasco Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Agnes, Virgin and Martyr second.
*January 29: St. Francis de Sales Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*January 30: St. Martina Virgin and Martyr, Semidouble.
*January 31: St. John Bosco Confessor, Double.

Sunday between the Circumcision and Epiphany [or January 2, when no such Sunday occurs] : The most holy Name of Jesus, Double of the II Class.
Sunday within the Octave of the Epiphany: The Most Holy Family of Jesus, Mary, Joseph, Greater Double.

February

*February 1: St. Ignatius Bishop and Martyr, Double.
*February 2: Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the II Class.
*February 3: St. Blase Bishop and Martyr, Simple.
*February 4: St. Andrew Corsini Bishop and Confessor, Double.
*February 5: St. Agatha Virgin Martyr, Double.
*February 6: St. Titus Bishop and Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Dorothy Virgin Martyr.
*February 7: St. Romuald Abbot, Double.
*February 8: St. John of Matha Confessor, Double.
*February 9: St. Cyril Bishop of Alexandria, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double, Com. of St. Apollonia Virgin Martyr.
*February 10: St. Scholastica Virgin, Double.
*February 11: Apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary Immaculate, Greater Double.
*February 12: The Seven Holy Founders of the Order of Servants of the Blessed Virgin Mary Confessors, Double.
*February 13: Feria
*February 14: St. Valentine Priest and Martyr, Simple.
*February 15: Ss. Faustinus and Jovita Martyrs, Simple.
*February 16: Feria
*February 17: Feria
*February 18: St. Simeon Bishop and Martyr, Simple.
*February 19: Feria
*February 20: Feria
*February 21: Feria
*February 22: Chair of St. Peter at Antioch, Greater Double, Com. of St. Paul.
*February 23: St. Peter Damian Confessor, Double, Com. of the Vigil.
*February 24: St. Matthias Apostle, Double of the II Class.
*February 25: Feria
*February 26: Feria
*February 27: St. Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows, Double
*February 28: Feria

In leap year the month of February is of 29 days, and the Feast of St. Matthias is celebrated on the 25th day and the Feast of St. Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows on the 28th day of February, and twice is said Sexto Kalendas, that is on the 24th and 25th; and the dominical letter, which was taken up in the month of January, is changed to the preceding; that, if in January, the dominical letter was A, it is changed to the preceding, which is g, etc.; and the letter f is kept twice, on the 24th and 25th. ["Kalendarium, "Breviarium Romanum": "In anno bissextili mensis Februarius est dierum 29, et Festum S. Matthiae celebratur die 25 ac Festum S. Gabrielis a Virgine Perdolente die 28 Febr., et bis dicitur Sexto Kalendas, id est die 24 et die 25; et littera dominicalis, quae assumpta fuit in mense Januario, mutatur in praecedentem; ut, si in Januario, littera dominicalis fuerit A, mutetur in praecedentem, quae est g, etc.; et littera f bis servit, 24 et 25."]

March

*March 1: Feria
*March 2: Feria
*March 3: Feria
*March 4: St. Casimir Confessor, Semidouble, Com. of St. Lucius I Pope and Martyr.
*March 5: Feria
*March 6: Ss. Perpetua and Felicity Martyrs, Double.
*March 7: St. Thomas Aquinas Confessor and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*March 8: St. John of God Confessor, Double.
*March 9: St. Frances of Rome Widow, Double.
*March 10: The Forty Holy Martyrs, Semidouble.
*March 11: Feria
*March 12: St. Gregory I Pope, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*March 13: Feria
*March 14: Feria
*March 15: Feria
*March 16: Feria
*March 17: St. Patrick Bishop and Confessor, Double.
*March 18: St. Cyril Bishop of Jerusalem, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*March 19: St. Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Confessor, and Patron of the Universal Church, Double of the I Class.
*March 20: Feria
*March 21: St. Benedict Abbot, Greater Double.
*March 22: Feria
*March 23: Feria
*March 24: St. Gabriel the Archangel, Greater Double.
*March 25: Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the I Class.
*March 26: Feria
*March 27: St. John Damascene Confessor and Doctor of the Church, Double
*March 28: St. John Capistran Confessor, Double
*March 29: Feria
*March 30: Feria
*March 31: Feria

Friday after Passion Sunday: Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Greater Double, Com. of the Feria.

April

*April 1: Feria
*April 2: St. Francis of Paula Confessor, Double.
*April 3: Feria
*April 4: St. Isidore Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*April 5: St. Vincent Ferrer Confessor, Double.
*April 6: Feria
*April 7: Feria
*April 8: Feria
*April 9: Feria
*April 10: Feria
*April 11: St. Leo I Pope, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*April 12: Feria
*April 13: St. Hermenegild Martyr, Semidouble.
*April 14: St. Justin, Double, Com. of Ss. Tiburtius, Valerian, and Maximus Martyrs.
*April 15: Feria
*April 16: Feria
*April 17: St. Anicetus Pope and Martyr, Simple.
*April 18: Feria
*April 19: Feria
*April 20: Feria
*April 21: St. Anselm Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*April 22: Ss. Soter and Cajus Popes and Martyrs, Semidouble.
*April 23: St. George Martyr, Semidouble.
*April 24: St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen Martyr, Double.
*April 25: St. Mark Evangelist, Double of the II Class.
*April 26: Ss. Cletus and Marcellinus Popes and Martyrs, Semidouble.
*April 27: St. Peter Canisius Confessor and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*April 28: St. Paul of the Cross Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Vitalis Martyr.
*April 29: St. Peter of Verona Martyr, Double.
*April 30: St. Catherine of Siena Virgin, Double.

Wednesday within the II Week after the Octave of Easter: Solemnity of St. Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Confessor, and Patron of the Universal Church, Double of the I Class with a common Octave.
Wednesday within the III Week after the Octave of Easter: Octave of St. Joseph, Greater Double.

May

*May 1: Ss. Philip and James Apostles, Double of the II Class.
*May 2: St. Athanasius, Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*May 3: Invention of the Holy Cross, Double of the II Class, Com. of Ss. Alexander I Pope, Eventius and Theodulus Martyrs, and Juvenal, Bishop and Confessor.
*May 4: St. Monica Widow, Double.
*May 5: St. Pius V Pope and Confessor, Double.
*May 6: St. John Apostle before the Latin Gate, Greater Double.
*May 7: St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr, Double.
*May 8: Apparition of St. Michael, Greater Double
*May 9: St. Gregory Nazianzen Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*May 10: St. Antoninus Bishop and Confessor, Double, Com. of Ss. Gordian and Epimachus.
*May 11: Feria
*May 12: Ss. Nereus, Achilleus, Domitilla Virgin, and Pancras Martyrs, Semidouble.
*May 13: St. Robert Bellarmine Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*May 14: St. Boniface Martyr, Simple.
*May 15: St. John Baptist de la Salle Confessor, Double.
*May 16: St. Ubald Bishop and Confessor, Semidouble.
*May 17: St. Paschal Baylon Confessor, Double.
*May 18: St. Venantius Martyr, Double.
*May 19: St. Peter Celestine Pope and Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Pudentiana Virgin.
*May 20: St. Bernardine of Siena Confessor, Semidouble.
*May 21: Feria
*May 22: Feria
*May 23: Feria
*May 24: Feria
*May 25: St. Gregory VII Pope and Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Urban I Pope and Martyr, Double.
*May 26: St. Philip Neri Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Eleutherius Pope and Martyr.
*May 27: St. Bede the Venerable Confessor and Doctor of the Church, Com. of St. John I Pope and Martyr, Double.
*May 28: St. Augustine Bishop and Confessor, Double.
*May 29: St. Mary Magdalen de Pazzi Virgin, Semidouble.
*May 30: St. Felix I Pope and Martyr, Double.
*May 31: St. Angela Merici Virgin, Double, Com. of St. Petronilla Virgin.

June

*June 1: Feria.
*June 2: Ss. Marcellinus, Peter, and Erasmus Bishop, Martyrs, Simple.
*June 3: Feria
*June 4: St. Francis Caracciolo Confessor, Double.
*June 5: St. Boniface Bishop and Martyr, Double.
*June 6: St. Norbert Bishop and Confessor, Double.
*June 7: Feria
*June 8: Feria
*June 9: Ss. Primus and Felician Martyrs, Simple.
*June 10: St. Margaret Queen, Widow, Semidouble.
*June 11: St. Barnabas Apostle, Greater Double.
*June 12: St. John of San Facundo Confessor, Double, Com. of Ss. Basilides, Cyrinus, Nabor and Nazarius Martyrs.
*June 13: St. Anthony of Padua Confessor, Double.
*June 14: St. Basil the Great Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*June 15: Ss. Vitus, Modestus, and Crescentia Martyrs, Simple.
*June 16: Feria
*June 17: Feria
*June 18: St. Ephraem Syrus Deacon, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double, Com. of Ss. Mark and Marcellianus Martyrs.
*June 19: St. Juliana Falconieri Virgin, Double, Com. of Ss. Gervase and Protase Martyrs.
*June 20: St. Silverius Pope and Martyr, Simple.
*June 21: St. Aloysius Gonzaga Confessor, Double.
*June 22: St. Paulinus Bishop and Confessor, Double
*June 23: Vigil.
*June 24: The Nativity of St. John the Baptist, Double of the I Class with a common Octave.
*June 25: St. William Abbot, Double, Com. of the Octave.
*June 26: Ss. John and Paul Martyrs, Double, Com. of the Octave.
*June 27: Of the IV day within the Octave of St. John the Baptist, Semidouble.
*June 28: St. Irenaeus Bishop and Martyr, Double, Com. of the Octave and of the Vigil.
*June 29: Ss. Peter and Paul Apostles, Double of the I Class with a common Octave.
*June 30: Commemoration of St. Paul Apostle, Greater Double, Com. of St. Peter Apostle and of the Octave of St. John the Baptist.

July

*July 1: The Most Precious Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, Double of the I Class, Com. of the Octave day of St. John the Baptist.
*July 2: Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the II Class, Com. of Ss. Processus and Martinian Martyrs.
*July 3: St. Leo II Pope and Confessor, Semidouble, Com. of the Octave of the Holy Apostles.
*July 4: Of the VI day within the Octave of Ss. Peter and Paul Apostles, Semidouble.
*July 5: St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria Confessor, Double, Com. of the Octave of the Holy Apostles.
*July 6: Octave of Ss. Peter and Paul Apostles, Greater Double.
*July 7: Ss. Cyril and Methodius Bishops and Confessors, Double.
*July 8: St. Elizabeth Queen, Widow, Semidouble.
*July 9: Feria
*July 10: The Seven Holy Brothers Martyrs, Semidouble, and Ss. Rufina and Secunda Virgins and Martyrs.
*July 11: St. Pius I Pope and Martyr, Simple.
*July 12: St. John Gualbert Abbot, Double, Com. of Ss. Nabor and Felix Martyrs.
*July 13: St. Anacletus Pope and Martyr, Semidouble.
*July 14: St. Bonaventure Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*July 15: St. Henry II Emperor, Confessor, Semidouble.
*July 16: Commemoration of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mt. Carmel, Greater Double.
*July 17: St. Alexius Confessor, Semidouble.
*July 18: St. Camillus de Lellis Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Symphorosa and her seven Sons Martyrs.
*July 19: St. Vincent de Paul Confessor, Double.
*July 20: St. Jerome Emiliani Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Margaret Virgin Martyr.
*July 21: St. Praxedes Virgin, Simple.
*July 22: St. Mary Magdalene Penitent, Double.
*July 23: St. Apollinaris Martyr, Double, Com. of St. Liborius Bishop and Confessor.
*July 24: Vigil. Com. of St. Christina Virgin and Martyr.
*July 25: St. James Apostle, Double of the II Class, Com. of St. Christopher Martyr.
*July 26: St. Anne Mother of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the II Class.
*July 27: St. Pantaleon Martyr, Simple.
*July 28: Ss. Nazarius and Celsus Martyrs, Victor I Pope and Martyr, and St. Innocent I Pope and Confessor, Semidouble.
*July 29: St. Martha Virgin, Semidouble, Com. of Ss. Felix II Pope, [It is perhaps unclear when the identification of the Saint Felix of 29 July with Antipope Felix II was abandoned. The identification is still found in the [http://www.sanctamissa.org/EN/resources/missale-romanum-pdf.html 1920 typical edition of the Roman Missal, with feasts updated to the late 1920s] , but does not appear in the [http://www.musicasacra.com/pdf/missale62.pdf 1962 typical edition] , which calls him simply a martyr (see General Roman Calendar of 1962). The 1952 Marietti printing of the Missal, which precedes 1954, the reference year for this article, also omits the numeral "II" and the word "Papae", however, the 1952 Pustet and the 1956 Typis Polyglottis Vaticanis printings of the Breviary still list Felix as a Pope and with the numeral II. The baselessness of the identification was recognized long before: in its 1909 article on [http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06030a.htm Felix II] ] the Catholic Encyclopedia referred to this identification as a "distortion of the true facts".] Simplicius, Faustinus, and Beatrice Martyrs.
*July 30: Ss. Abdon and Sennen Martyrs, Simple.
*July 31: St. Ignatius Confessor, Double.

August

*August 1: St. Peter in Chains, Greater Double, Com. of St. Paul and the Holy Machabees Martyrs.
*August 2: St. Alphonsus Mary of Liguori Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double, Com. of St. Stephen I Pope and Martyr.
*August 3: Invention of St. Stephen Protomartyr, Semidouble.
*August 4: St. Dominic Confessor, Greater Double.
*August 5: Dedication of Our Lady of the Snows, Greater Double.
*August 6: Transfiguration of our Lord Jesus Christ, Double of the II Class, Com. of Ss. Xystus II Pope, Felicissimus, and Agapitus Martyrs.
*August 7: St. Cajetan Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Donatus.
*August 8: Ss. Cyriacus, Largus and Smaragdus Martyrs, Semidouble.
*August 9: St. John Vianney Confessor and Priest, Double, Com. of the Vigil and St. Romanus Martyr.
*August 10: St. Laurence Martyr, Double of the II Class with a simple Octave.
*August 11: Ss. Tiburtius and Susanna Virgin, Martyrs, Simple.
*August 12: St. Clare Virgin, Double.
*August 13: Ss. Hippolytus and Cassian Martyrs, Simple.
*August 14: Vigil. Com. of St. Eusebius Confessor.
*August 15: Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the I Class with a common Octave.
*August 16: St. Joachim Father of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Confessor, Double of the II Class.
*August 17: St. Hyacinth Confessor, Double, Com. of the Octave of the Assumption and the Octave Day of St. Laurence.
*August 18: Of the IV day within the Octave of the Assumption, Semidouble, Com. of St. Agapitus Martyr.
*August 19: St. John Eudes Confessor, Double, Com. of the Octave of the Assumption.
*August 20: St. Bernard Abbot, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double, Com. of the Octave of the Assumption.
*August 21: St. Jane Frances de Chantal Widow, Double, Com. of the Octave of the Assumption.
*August 22: Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the II Class, Com. of Ss. Timothy, Hippolytus Bishop, and Symphorianus Martyrs.
*August 23: St. Philip Benizi Confessor, Double, Com. of the Vigil.
*August 24: St. Bartholomew Apostle, Double of the II Class.
*August 25: St. Louis King, Confessor, Semidouble.
*August 26: St. Zephyrinus Pope Martyr, Simple.
*August 27: St. Joseph Calasanctius Confessor, Double.
*August 28: St. Augustine Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double, Com. of St. Hermes Martyr.
*August 29: Beheading of St. John the Baptist, Greater Double, Com. of St. Sabina Martyr.
*August 30: St. Rose of St. Mary Virgin of Lima, Double, Com. of Ss. Felix and Adauctus Martyrs.
*August 31: St. Raymond Nonnatus Confessor, Double.

eptember

*September 1: St. Giles Abbot, Simple, Com. of the Holy Twelve Brothers Martyrs.
*September 2: St. Stephen King, Confessor, Semidouble.
*September 3: St. Pius X Pope and Confessor, Double.
*September 4: Feria
*September 5: St. Laurence Justinian Bishop and Confessor, Semidouble.
*September 6: Feria
*September 7: Feria
*September 8: Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the II Class with a simple Octave, Com. of St. Adrian Martyr.
*September 9: St. Gorgonius Martyr, Simple.
*September 10: St. Nicholas of Tolentino Confessor, Double.
*September 11: Ss. Protus and Hyacinth Martyrs, Simple.
*September 12: The Most Holy Name of Mary, Greater Double.
*September 13: Feria
*September 14: Exaltation of the Holy Cross, Greater Double.
*September 15: Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the II Class, Com. of St. Nicomedes Martyr.
*September 16: St. Cornelius Pope and St. Cyprian Bishop, Martyrs, Semidouble, Com. of Ss. Euphemia Virgin, Lucy and Geminian Martyrs.
*September 17: Impression of the sacred Stigmata of St. Francis Confessor, Double.
*September 18: St. Joseph of Cupertino Confessor, Double.
*September 19: St. Januarius Bishop and Companions Martyrs, Double.
*September 20: St. Eustace and Companions Martyrs, Double, Com. of the Vigil.
*September 21: St. Matthew Apostle and Evangelist, Double of the II Class.
*September 22: St. Thomas of Villanova Bishop and Confessor, Double, Com. of Ss. Maurice and Companions Martyrs.
*September 23: St. Linus Pope and Martyr, Semidouble, Com. of St. Thecla Virgin and Martyr.
*September 24: Our Lady of Ransom, Greater Double.
*September 25: Feria
*September 26: Ss. Cyprian and Justina Virgin, Martyrs, Simple.
*September 27: Ss. Cosmas and Damian Martyrs, Semidouble.
*September 28: St. Wenceslaus Duke, Martyr, Semidouble.
*September 29: Dedication of St. Michael Archangel, Double of the I Class.
*September 30: St. Jerome Priest, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.

October

*October 1: St. Remigius Bishop and Confessor, Simple.
*October 2: The Holy Guardian Angels, Greater Double.
*October 3: St. Teresa of the Child Jesus Virgin, Double.
*October 4: St. Francis of Assisi Confessor, Greater Double.
*October 5: St. Placid and companions Martyrs, Simple.
*October 6: St. Bruno Confessor, Double.
*October 7: The most Holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the II Class, Com. of St. Mark Pope and Confessor, and Ss. Sergius, Bacchus, Marcellus and Apuleius Martyrs.
*October 8: St. Bridget Widow, Double.
*October 9: St. John Leonard Confessor, Semidouble, St. Denis Bishop, Rusticus Priest, and Eleutherius Martyrs.
*October 10: St. Francis Borgia Confessor, Semidouble.
*October 11: The Maternity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the II Class.
*October 12: Feria
*October 13: St. Edward King, Confessor, Semidouble.
*October 14: St. Callistus I Pope and Martyr, Double.
*October 15: St. Teresa Virgin, Double.
*October 16: St. Hedwig Widow, Semidouble.
*October 17: St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Virgin, Double.
*October 18: St. Luke Evangelist, Double of the II Class.
*October 19: St. Peter of Alcantara Confessor, Double.
*October 20: St. John Cantius Confessor, Double.
*October 21: St. Hilarion Abbot, Simple, Com. of St. Ursula and Companions Virgins and Martyrs.
*October 22: Feria
*October 23: Feria
*October 24: St. Raphael Archangel, Greater Double.
*October 25: Ss. Chrysanthus and Daria Martyrs, Simple.
*October 26: St. Evaristus Pope and Martyr, Simple.
*October 27: Vigil.
*October 28: Ss. Simon and Jude Apostles, Double of the II Class.
*October 29: Feria
*October 30: Feria
*October 31: Vigil.

Last Sunday in October: The Feast of our Lord Jesus Christ the King, Double of the I Class, Com. of the Sunday.

November

*November 1: All Saints, Double of the I Class
*November 2: Commemoration of all the Faithful Departed, Double.
*November 3: Of the III day within the Octave of All Saints, Semidouble.
*November 4: St. Charles Bishop and Confessor, Double, Com. of the Octave of All Saints and Ss. Vitalis and Agricola Martyrs.
*November 5: Of the V day within the Octave of All Saints, Semidouble.
*November 6: Of the VI day within the Octave of All Saints, Semidouble.
*November 7: Of the VII day within the Octave of All Saints, Semidouble.
*November 8: Octave of All Saints, Greater Double, Com. of the Holy Four Crowned Martyrs.
*November 9: Dedication of the Archbasilica of the most Holy Saviour, Double of the II Class, Com. of St. Theodore Martyr.
*November 10: St. Andrew Avellino Confessor, Double, Com. of Ss. Tryphon, Respicius, and Nympha Martyrs.
*November 11: St. Martin Bishop and Confessor, Double, Com. of St. Mennas Martyr.
*November 12: St. Martin I Pope and Martyr, Semidouble.
*November 13: St. Didacus Confessor, Semidouble.
*November 14: St. Josaphat Bishop and Martyr, Double.
*November 15: St. Albert the Great Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double.
*November 16: St. Gertrude Virgin, Double.
*November 17: St. Gregory Thaumaturgus Bishop and Confessor, Semidouble.
*November 18: Dedication of the Basilicas of Ss. Peter and Paul, Greater Double
*November 19: St. Elisabeth Widow, Double, Com. of St. Pontianus Pope and Martyr.
*November 20: St. Felix of Valois Confessor, Double.
*November 21: Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Greater Double
*November 22: St. Cecilia Virgin and Martyr, Double.
*November 23: St. Clement I Pope and Martyr, Double, Com. of St. Felicitas Martyr.
*November 24: St. John of the Cross Confessor and Doctor of the Church, Double, Com. St. Chrysogonus Martyr.
*November 25: St. Catherine Virgin and Martyr, Double.
*November 26: St. Sylvester Abbot, Double, Com. of St. Peter of Alexandria Bishop and Martyr.
*November 27: Feria
*November 28: Feria
*November 29: Vigil. Commemoration of St. Saturninus.
*November 30: St. Andrew Apostle, Double of the II Class.

December

*December 1: Feria
*December 2: St. Bibiana Virgin and Martyr, Semidouble.
*December 3: St. Francis Xavier Confessor, Greater Double.
*December 4: St. Peter Chrysologus Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double, Com. of St. Barbara Virgin and Martyr.
*December 5: Com. of St. Sabbas Abbot.
*December 6: St. Nicholas Bishop and Confessor, Double.
*December 7: St. Ambrose Bishop, Confessor, and Doctor of the Church, Double, Com. of the Vigil.
*December 8: The Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Double of the I Class
*December 9: Of the II day within the Octave of the Immaculate Conception, Semidouble.
*December 10: Of the III day within the Octave of the Immaculate Conception, Semidouble, Com. of St. Melchiades Pope and Martyr.
*December 11: St. Damasus I Pope and Confessor, Semidouble, Com. of the Octave of the Immaculate Conception.
*December 12: Of the V day within the Octave of the Immaculate Conception, Semidouble.
*December 13: St. Lucy Virgin and Martyr, Double, Com. of the Octave of the Immaculate Conception.
*December 14: Of the VII day within the Octave of the Immaculate Conception, Semidouble.
*December 15: Octave of the Immaculate Conception, Greater Double.
*December 16: St. Eusebius Bishop and Martyr, Semidouble.
*December 17: Feria
*December 18: Feria
*December 19: Feria
*December 20: Vigil.
*December 21: St. Thomas Apostle, Double of the II Class.
*December 22: Feria
*December 23: Feria
*December 24: Vigil.
*December 25: Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ, Double of the I Class with a privileged Octave of the III rank.
*December 26: St. Stephen Protomartyr, Double of the II class with a simple Octave, Com. of the Octave of the Nativity.
*December 27: St. John Apostle and Evangelist, Double of the II class with a simple Octave, Com. of the Octave of the Nativity.
*December 28: The Holy Innocents, Double of the II class with a simple Octave, Com. of the Octave of the Nativity.
*December 29: St. Thomas Bishop and Martyr, Double, Com. of the Octave of the Nativity.
*December 30: Of the VI day within the Octave of the Nativity, Semidouble.
*December 31: St. Sylvester I Pope and Confessor, Double, Com. of the Octave of the Nativity.

Although not listed on the general Calendar, a commemoration of St. Anastasia Martyr is made at the second Mass on December 25.

Moveable Feasts

The moveable feasts are those connected with the Easter cycle, and Easter is the date relative to which their position is ultimately determined. The date of Easter is determined relative to the lunar calendar as used by the Hebrews. The rule has since the Middle Ages been phrased as “Easter is observed on the Sunday after the first full moon on or after the day of the vernal equinox.” However, this does not reflect the actual ecclesiastical rules precisely. One reason for this is that the full moon involved (called the Paschal full moon) is not an astronomical full moon, but an ecclesiastical moon. Another difference is that the astronomical vernal equinox is a natural astronomical phenomenon, which can fall on 20 or 21 March, while the ecclesiastical vernal equinox is a fixed March 21 (on the Gregorian Calendar). Easter is determined from tables which determine Easter based on the ecclesiastical rules described above, which do not always coincide with the astronomical full moon. The moveable feasts are given below:

Septuagesima Sunday (9th Sunday before Easter)
Sexagesima Sunday (8th Sunday before Easter)
Quinquagesima Sunday (7th Sunday before Easter)
Ash Wednesday (Wednesday after Quinquagesima Sunday)
Passion Sunday (Sunday 2 weeks before Easter)
Feast of the Seven Sorrows of the Virgin Mary (Friday after 2nd Sunday before Easter)
Palm Sunday (Sunday before Easter)
Holy Thursday (Thursday before Easter)
Good Friday (Friday before Easter)
Holy Saturday (Saturday before Easter)
Easter Sunday, the Solemnity of Solemnities, the Resurrection of Our Lord Jesus Christ
Low Sunday (Sunday after Easter)
The Solemnity of St. Joseph, spouse of the Virgin Mary, confessor, and patron of the Universal Church (Wednesday after the 2nd Sunday after Easter)
The Octave of St. Joseph, spouse of the Virgin Mary, confessor and patron of the Universal Church (Wednesday after the 3rd Sunday after Easter)
The Lesser Litanies at St. Mary Major (Monday after the 5th Sunday after Easter)
The Lesser Litanies at St. John Lateran (Tuesday after the 5th Sunday after Easter)
The Vigil of the Ascension of our Lord Jesus Christ and the Lesser Litanies at St. Peter's (Wednesday after the 5th Sunday after Easter)
The Ascension (Thursday after the 5th Sunday after Easter)
The Octave of the Ascension (Thursday after the 6th Sunday after Easter)
The Vigil of Pentecost (Saturday after the 6th Sunday after Easter)
Pentecost (7th Sunday after Easter)
Holy Trinity and the Octave of Pentecost (8th Sunday after Easter)
Corpus Christi (Thursday after the 8th Sunday after Easter)
Octave of Corpus Christi (Thursday after the 9th Sunday after Easter)
Sacred Heart of Jesus (Friday after the 9th Sunday after Easter)
Octave of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (Friday after the 10th Sunday after Easter)
The 1954 calendar assigned special celebrations also to the days within these Octaves, as to the days within the Octaves of fixed feasts.

Feasts celebrated in some places

The pre-1962 Roman Missal also listed a number of celebrations in the section headed "Mass for Some Places". These celebrations were:

The Holy House of Loreto (10 December)
The Expectation of the Blessed Virgin Mary (18 December)
The Betrothal of the Virgin Mary with Saint Joseph (23 January)
Saint Ildephonsus (23 January)
The Flight into Egypt (17 February)
Saint Margaret of Cortona (26 February)
The Prayer of Christ (Tuesday after Septuagesima)
Commemoration of the Passion of Christ (Tuesday after Sexagesima)
The Sacred Crown of Thorns (Friday after Ash Wednesday)
The Sacred Lance and Nails (Friday after the First Sunday in Lent)
The Holy Shroud (Friday after the Second Sunday in Lent)
The Five Holy Wounds (Friday after the Third Sunday in Lent)
The Precious Blood (Friday after the Fourth Sunday in Lent)
Saint Catherine of Genoa (22 March)
Saint Benedict Joseph Labre (16 April)
Our Lady of Good Counsel (26 April)
Saint Isidore the Farmer (15 May)
Saint John Nepomucene (16 May)
Saint Rita of Cascia (22 May)
Saint John Baptist de Rossi (23 May)
Our Lady Help of Christians (24 May)
Saint Ferdinand III (30 May)
Saint Joan of Arc (30 May)
Our Lady Queen of All Saints and Mother of Fair Love (31 May)
Our Lady Mediatrix of All Graces (31 May)
Our Lady Queen of the Apostles (Saturday after the Ascension)
The Eucharistic Heart of Jesus (Thursday the Sacred Heart)
The Immaculate Heart of Mary (Saturday after the Octave of the Sacred Heart of Jesus)
Our Lady Mother of Grace (9 June)
Saint John Francis Regis (16 June)
Our Lady of Prompt Succor (27 June)
All Holy Popes (3 July)
Saint Lawrence of Brindisi (7 July)
Saint Veronica Giuliani (9 July)
Humility of the Blessed Virgin Mary (17 July)
Our Lady Mother of Mercy (Saturday after the 4th Sunday of July)
Saint Emygdius (9 August)
Saint Philomena (11 August)
Our Lady Refuge of Sinners (13 August)
Saint John Berchmans (13 August)
Saint Roch (16 August)
Empress Helena (18 August)
Our Lady of Consolation (Saturday after the Feast of St. Augustine)
Our Lady Help of the Sick (Saturday after the last Sunday in August)
Saint Rose of Viterbo (4 September)
Saint Peter Claver (9 September)
Saint Gregory the Illuminator (1 October)
Purity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (16 October)
Feast of the Holy Redeemer (23 October)
The Sacred Relics (5 November)
Saint Stanislaus Kostka (13 November)
Our Lady Mother of Divine Providence (Saturday after the 3rd Sunday in November)
St. Leonard of Port Maurice (26 November)
Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal (27 November)

References

ee also

*Namesdays
*Moveable feast
*Namesdays in Sweden
*Namedays in the Czech Republic
*List of saints

External links

* [http://www.s-clements.org/Schedules_Calendar.html An Anglican calendar] based on the General Roman Calendar as in 1954


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