Bliemeister method


Bliemeister method

The Bliemeister method, refers to the gentleman that patented this method. His name is Louis Bliemeister, and he is originally from Bancroft, Nebraska. Some believe that his name is likely a misspelling of the German word "Bleimeister" (Lead Master). However, the spelling is correct. The Bliemeister method is the modern method of making lead shot in small sizes, replacing the shot tower. Metered molten lead is dropped a very short distance (quarter inch, rather than 150-300 feet as a shot tower might use) into hot water or another hot coolant, and rolled along an incline underwater to round the balls. The temperature of the water is controlled according to the cooling rate, which depends on the size of the shot as well as the purity of the lead. Antimony, added for hardness, raises the melting point of lead. [cite web
url=http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BQY/is_4_49/ai_98124187
title=The romance of lead shot
publisher=Guns Magazine
date=April, 2003
first=Holt
last=Bodinson
accessyear=2008
accessmonthday=February 29
]

Machines such as the "Incredible Shotmaker" allow hunters to make their own lead shot at home by the Bliemeister process out of scrap lead such as automobile wheelweights.

References


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Shot tower — A shot tower is a tower designed for the production of shot balls by freefall of molten lead, which is then caught in a water basin. The shot is used for projectiles in firearms. hot makingProcessIn a shot tower, lead is heated until molten, then …   Wikipedia


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