Naval battles of the American Civil War


Naval battles of the American Civil War
The "Battle of Mobile Bay", by Louis Prang.

The naval engagements of the American Civil War changed the foundations of naval warfare due to the first-time use of ironclads and submarines, and the introduction of newer and more powerful naval artillery.

The first shots of the naval war were fired on April 13, 1861, during the Battle of Fort Sumter, by the Revenue Service cutter USRC Harriet Lane and the final on June 22, 1865, by the Confederate raider CSS Shenandoah, in the Bering Strait, more than two months after General Robert E. Lee's surrender of the Confederate Army.

Battles

Battle Start date End date Notes
First Battle of Fort Sumter April 13, 1861 April 14, 1861 First shots of the naval war fired, first battle of the war
Battle of Gloucester Point May 7, 1861 May 7, 1861 First naval battle of the war
Battle of Sewell's Point May 18, 1861 May 19, 1861
Battle of Aquia Creek May 29, 1861 June 1, 1861 First use of torpedos by Confederate forces in combat
Battle of Pig Point June 5, 1861 June 5, 1861
Battle of Mathias Point June 27, 1861 June 27, 1861
Sinking of the Petrel July 28, 1861 July 28, 1861 One of the last naval battles in history involving a privateer ship
Battle of Cockle Creek October 5, 1861 October 5, 1861
Battle of the Head of Passes October 12, 1861 October 12, 1861
Battle of Port Royal November 7, 1861 November 7, 1861 First major naval battle of the war
Battle of Cockpit Point January 3, 1862 January 3, 1862
Battle of Lucas Bend January 11, 1862 January 11, 1862 Last naval battle in history involving the use of timberclad warships performing a major combat role
Battle of Fort Henry February 6, 1862 February 6, 1862
Battle of Elizabeth City February 10, 1862 February 10, 1862
Battle of Hampton Roads March 8, 1862 March 9, 1862 First naval battle involving ironclad warships
Battle of Forts Jackson and St. Philip April 16, 1862 April 28, 1862 Led to the Union capture of New Orleans
Battle of Island Number Ten February 28, 1862 April 8, 1862 First Confederate defeat on the Mississippi River
Battle of Plum Point Bend May 10, 1862 May 10, 1862
Battle of Drewry's Bluff May 15, 1862 May 15, 1862
Battle of Memphis June 6, 1862 June 6, 1862 Last time in history civilians with no military or naval experience were permitted to command warships in combat
Battle of Saint Charles June 17, 1862 June 17, 1862
Battle of Tampa June 30, 1862 July 1, 1862
Battle of Corpus Christi August 12, 1862 August 18, 1862
Battle of Galveston Harbor October 4, 1862 October 4, 1862
Battle of Crumpler's Bluff October 3, 1862 October 3, 1862
Battle of Fort Hindman January 9, 1863 January 11, 1863 Led to the largest surrender of Confederate troops west of the Mississippi River prior to the end of the war
Battle off Galveston Lighthouse January 11, 1863 January 11, 1863
Battle of Fort McAllister March 3, 1863 March 3, 1863
Battle of Fort Pemberton March 11, 1863 March 11, 1863
First Battle of Charleston Harbor April 7, 1863 April 7, 1863
Battle of Wassaw Sound June 17, 1863 June 17, 1863
Battle of Portland Harbor June 27, 1863 June 27, 1863
First Battle of Fort Wagner July 10, 1863 July 11, 1863
Second Battle of Fort Wagner July 18, 1863 July 18, 1863
Second Battle of Charleston Harbor August 17, 1863 September 8, 1863
Second Battle of Sabine Pass September 8, 1863 September 8, 1863 Most one sided Confederate victory of the war
Second Battle of Fort Sumter September 9, 1863 September 9, 1863
Attack on USS New Ironsides October 5, 1863 October 5, 1863 CSS David becomes the first torpedo boat to make a successful attack on an enemy warship in combat
Battle of Fort Brooke October 16, 1863 October 18, 1863
Sinking of USS Housatonic February 17, 1864 February 17, 1864 H. L. Hunley becomes the first submarine to sink an enemy warship in combat
Battle of Fort Pillow April 12, 1864 April 12, 1864
Battle of Plymouth April 17, 1865 April 20, 1864
Battle of Albemarle Sound May 5, 1864 May 5, 1864
Battle of Cherbourg June 19, 1864 June 19, 1864 Led to the sinking of the Confederate raider CSS Alabama
Battle of Mobile Bay August 2, 1864 August 23, 1864 Greatest Union naval victory of the war
Bahia Incident October 7, 1864 October 7, 1864 Led to the capture of the Confederate raider CSS Florida, international incident with Brazil
Capture of Plymouth October 29, 1864 October 31, 1864
Jamesville Incident December 9, 1864 December 9, 1864
Second Battle of Fort Fisher January 13, 1865 Januery 15, 1865 Largest amphibious assault of the war
Battle of Trent's Reach January 23, 1865 January 25, 1865 One of the final major naval battles of the war
Blockade of the South 1861 1865 Part of the Anaconda Plan

See also

References


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