South Asian wedding


South Asian wedding
Wedding in Bangalore, ritualistic part involving a priest.
An Indian bride.

South Asian weddings are very bright events, filled with ritual and celebration, that continue for several days. They are generally not small affairs, with anywhere between 100 to 10,000 people attending. Often, it is possible that many of the attendees are unknown to the bride and groom themselves. Though most Indian marriages are arranged, some couples in urban areas have what are known as "love marriages", in which the partners decide to marry each other without family involvement or assistance. The traditional Indian wedding is about two families being brought together socially, with as much emphasis placed on the families concerned coming closer as the individuals involved.

Many of the wedding customs are common among Hindus, Jains, Sikhs, and even Muslims. They are a combination of local, religious, and family traditions.The period of Hindu marriage ceremonies dates from the presenting tilak, and is called lagan/[shaadi].

South Asian weddings are a mainstay in the social calendar of the whole community. Many wedding traditions which have originated in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh have carried over to second and third generation immigrant populations in western countries such as the UK and United States. Increasingly, younger Asian couples are starting to incorporate Western features into their weddings, such as speeches, the first dance, as well as the traditional wedding cake.

The Preparation for South Asian weddings is typically a lavish affair - estimated at costing on average £30,000 in the UK[citation needed] compared to an average of £17,000.[1]

Contents

Traditions

Wedding traditions vary across religion, caste, ethnicity, language, region, etc. Traditional Indian weddings are generally structured into pre-wedding ceremonies, wedding day ceremonies (consisting of the Baraat, the Varmala and the Satphere), and the Vidaai. When the marriage has been agreed upon, the father of the bridegroom visits the father of the bride. The day before the expected arrival of the marriage procession, lavish preparations are done by the family to receive the groom (shaadi ki tayaari) in beautiful and decorated venues, typically farmhouses or hotel halls, where a sacrificial fireplace called marhwa is built. Brides decorate themselves by wearing gold and diamond jewellery, apply [mehndi] to colour hands and feet, and undergo various bridal makeups, including wearing bridal lehenga or saree. Bridegrooms typically wear a [sherwani] dress or a designer suit. To complete the marriage, the bride and groom move in circles around the sacrificial fire, called phera.

Vidaai is when the bride is formally sent to the groom’s household. It can get quite emotional even for the most stonehearted. Many heart-wrenching songs have immortalized this moment when the bride leaves her ‘babul ka ghar’ or father’s house[2] hi

An example of the complexity of an Indian wedding can be seen from the various phases of a wedding in North India. The following events take place in a typical Eastern Uttar Pradesh Hindu marriage:

According to Hindu religious texts, Brahma created man from the right shoulder and woman from his left shoulder. A woman is referred to as Vamangi or one who is on the left side. Throughout the marriage ceremony the bride sits on the right side of the groom. That is the place for strangers and acquaintances. Only after the Saptpadi, when the bride and groom have exchanged marital vows, is the wife seated on the left side of the man.

Bride and groom are told about their duties and responsibilities in married life by priest. These vows direct the couple to a positive path of action. They help in promoting marital happiness for a lifetime.

A wedding ceremony in Delhi.

Vows by the Husband

  1. I will consider my wife to be The better half. I will look after her just as I look after myself.
  2. Accepting her as in-charge of my home, I shall plan things in consultation with her.
  3. I will never express dissatisfaction about any shortcomings in my wife. If there are any, I will explain them to her lovingly. I will support her in overcoming them.
  4. I will always have faith in my wife. I will never look at another woman with wrong intent, nor have an illicit relationship.
  5. I will be affectionate and treat my wife like a friend.
  6. I will bring home all my income to my wife. The household expenses will be incurred with her consent. I will always make an effort to ensure her comfort and happiness.
  7. I will not find fault or criticize my wife before others. We will sort out our differences and mistakes in privacy by ourselves.
  8. I will have a courteous and tolerant attitude towards my wife. I will always follow a compromising policy.
  9. If my wife is unwell, or is unable to fulfill some of the responsibilities or through some misunderstanding behaves wrongly, I will not withdraw support or refuse to fulfill my responsibilities towards her.

Kanyadaan

During kanyadaan, the bride’s parents give their daughter away in marriage. The groom makes three promises – to be just (dharma), earn sufficiently to support his family, (artha) and love his wife (kama). He repeats these vows thrice in the presence of Agni (the sacred fire) and all who are gathered there.[3]

Bariksha

Bariksha is when the bride's parents have informally shown intentions that they want a particular groom, and the groom and his family have agreed. Retracting at the end of this stage is frowned upon but is acceptable. Once the wedding has been decided on by both sides, the bride's family goes and does Badcheka/ Bariksha of the groom. This is when the bride's father and brothers go to the groom's side with sweets (including a coconut) and some pooja items like rice and turmeric. This ceremony is a token gesture to confirm the alliance and signifies that the groom is now "taken" and can no longer look for other prospective brides.

Lord Ganesha on an Indian wedding invitation card. Lord Ganesha is believed to bring prosperity and happiness to the marrying couple and their family.

Tilak

Tilak involves the bride's parents traveling to the groom's family home to formalise the relationship. A large feast is organised by the groom's family to celebrate this occasion. Only a nominal number of members of the bride's family are present (usually only very close relatives, often in tens of numbers). Typically, the female marriage proposal is very rare.

Byaha Haath

Byaha Haath: This ceremony signifies the purifying of the mind, body and soul of bride and groom. This daytime ceremony prepares both of them for the nuptials. 'Uptan' is a mixed paste of sandalwood, turmeric and rose water which is applied by seven unmarried female members of the families to the faces, hands and feet of the bride and groom. After this ceremony the bride and the groom are not allowed to step outside the house before the actual wedding.

Flower bed ceremony

In the flower bed ceremony, the bride wears a lot of floral ornaments and the marriage bed is decorated with flowers by the groom's family. This is the night of consummation. In Muslim marriages, this takes place on the night of the wedding. In Hindu marriages, this takes place on the night of the reception.

Gallery

References

Further reading

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • South Asian cinema — refers to the cinema of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan and the Maldives. The region of South Asia bears close cultural and religious ties with the regions of East Asia and South East Asia. Bollywood, of India s …   Wikipedia

  • South Asian arts — Literary, performing, and visual arts of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Myths of the popular gods, Vishnu and Shiva, in the Puranas (ancient tales) and the Mahabharata and Ramayana epics, supply material for representational and… …   Universalium

  • South Africa — This article is about the modern country. For other uses, see South Africa (disambiguation). Republic of South Africa …   Wikipedia

  • arts, East Asian — Introduction       music and visual and performing arts of China, Korea, and Japan. The literatures of these countries are covered in the articles Chinese literature, Korean literature, and Japanese literature.       Some studies of East Asia… …   Universalium

  • Southeast Asian arts — Literary, performing, and visual arts of Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, and the Philippines. The classical literatures of Southeast Asia can be divided into three major regions: the Sanskrit region of… …   Universalium

  • Desi wedding photography — Arrival of the bridegroom, dressed as a prince. Night time outdoor flash photography Desi wedding photography is the photography of activities relating to Indian and other South Asian weddings. Indian weddings are a Rs. 800 billion industry,… …   Wikipedia

  • Mnet Asian Music Awards — Awarded for Music Videos and pop culture Presented by Mnet Country South Korea …   Wikipedia

  • Marriage in South Korea — is similar to that in the West, but has unique features of its own, especially due to the influence of Korean Confucianism. Contents 1 Eligibility 1.1 Marriage within the same ancestral clan 2 Traditional wedding ceremonies …   Wikipedia

  • My Big Fat Greek Wedding — Theatrical release poster Directed by Joel Zwick …   Wikipedia

  • List of recurring South Park characters — The following is a list of recurring characters in the animated television series South Park. This does not include the school children, family members or the school staff. Contents 1 Big Gay Al …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.