List of minor DC Comics characters


List of minor DC Comics characters

Throughout its history, DC Comics has introduced many, many characters. Most of them have been minor characters. These characters range from supporting characters, heroes, and/or villains that appear infrequently to those that only take part in a single story.

Contents: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZReferences


A

Alura

First appearance Action Comics #252 (May 1959)
Created by Otto Binder and Al Plastino
Species Kryptonian

Alura In-Ze is a Kryptonian and mother of Supergirl in the DC universe.

The character, created by Otto Binder and Al Plastino, first appeared in Action Comics #252 (May 1959).

Within the context of the DC Universe, three distinct versions of Alura have been presented but in each case she is the mother of Superman's cousin. The character as first introduced survives the destruction of Krypton along with her husband, Zor-El, and the rest of Argo City. Years later, when a second catastrophe threatens to destroy Argo City, she and her husband send their daughter, born long after the destruction of Krypton, to Earth. Later stories reveal that Alura and Zor-El had escaped the destruction of Argo city in a "survival zone" to be reunited with their grown daughter.

A variation, named Allura In-Z, appeared in Showcase #98 (March 1978) in a story set in the publisher's Earth-Two continuity as the mother of Power Girl.

Both of these versions of the character were removed from in-story continuity as part of Crisis on Infinite Earths along with most of the material related to Supergirl and the Earth-Two version of Superman.

When the Kara Zor-El version of Supergirl was re-introduced in "The Supergirl from Krypton" in 2004,[1] Alura was also re-introduced. In this version Alura and Zor-El send their daughter to Earth during the destruction of Krypton, intending her to help raise her infant cousin. Alura also saves Argo City by constructing a protective dome around it. When Brainiac returns to Krypton to survey his destruction of the planet, he merges Argo City with the previously shrunken Kandor. The character wold play a prominent role in the story arc "New Krypton" and the follow up limited series and arcs Superman: World of New Krypton, "Last Stand of New Krypton", and Superman: War of the Supermen.

In other media

The character of Alura has been adapted for appearances in a film and television show based on the Superman characters.

  • Supergirl in 1984 portrayed by Mia Farrow.
  • Superman: The Animated Series in the episode introducing Supergirl to the series.

Amazing Grace

First appearance Superman vol. 2 #3 (March 1987)
Created by John Byrne
Species New God
Teams Darkseid's Elite
Abilities Hypnotic suggestion/mind control

Amazing Grace is an extraterrestrial supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by John Byrne, first appeared in Superman vol. 2 #3 (March 1987).[2]

Within the context of the DC Universe, Amazing Grace is a New God of Apokolips and sister of Glorious Godfrey. She acts on behalf of Darkseid among the lowlies of Apokolips, continually instigating opposition and revolt which is quickly defeated, keeping their spirits broken.

Archer

First appearance Superman #13 (November–December 1941)
Created by Jerry Siegel and Leo Nowak[3]
Abilities Master Archer
Aliases Fenton Quigley

The Archer is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Jerry Siegel and Leo Nowak, first appeared in Superman #13 (November–December 1941).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Fenton Quigley is a wealthy big game hunter who, after an argument with his father, is cut off from the family fortune. To maintain his lifestyle, he turns to crime using his skill with the bow. He robs the wealthy by threatening to kill them at bow-point. He is defeated by Superman, arrested, convicted, and jailed.[4]

In other media

A character of the same name appeared in the television series Batman portrayed by Art Carney. According to the records of the show's production company, the character Carney played was created specifically for the series by writer Stanley Ralph Ross, not adapted from the Superman character.[5] This character was later adapted for an appearance in animated series Batman: The Brave and the Bold.

Atlan

First appearance The Atlantis Chronicles #5 (July 1990)
Created by Peter David and Esteban Maroto

Atlan is a mage from ancient Atlantis in the DC universe.

The character, created by Peter David and Esteban Maroto, first appeared in The Atlantis Chronicles #5 (July 1990).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Atlan is a member of the homo magi off shoot of humanity born in ancient Atlantis. While within the linage of the Atlantian royal house, his spirit interact with the past generation to father Aquaman, Ocean Master, and Deep Blue.[6] He also acts as a mentor in magic to Aqualad.

Awesome Threesome

First appearance Aquaman #36 (November 1967)
Created by Josh Miller and Nick Cardy

Awesome Threesome is a trio of extraterrestrial robots in the DC universe.

The characters, created by Josh Miller and Nick Cardy, first appeared in Aquaman #36 (November 1967).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Awesome Threesome are a diversion for an escaping alien criminal.

In other media

The group also appeared in two episodes of The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure.

B

Bison-Black-as-Midnight-Sky

First appearance The Fury of Firestorm #1 (June 1982)
Created by Gerry Conway and Pat Broderick
Abilities Manipulation of magic

Bison-Black-as-Midnight-Sky is a Native American shaman in the DC universe.

The character, created by Gerry Conway and Pat Broderick, first appeared in The Fury of Firestorm #1 (June 1982).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Bison-Black-as-Midnight-Sky is the great-grandfather of John Ravenhair and the last great shaman of the Bison Cult. He resents his great-grandson's disrespect for their traditions. When he is killed by muggers in Central Park, he binds his spirit to a magical amulet.[7] The amulet allows his spirit to influence or control his great-grandson when worn.

Black Bison

First appearance The Fury of Firestorm #1 (June 1982)
Created by Gerry Conway and Pat Broderick
Abilities Manipulation of magic
Aliases John Ravenhair, Black-Cloud-in-Morning

Black Bison is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Gerry Conway and Pat Broderick, first appeared in Fury of Firestorm #1 (June 1982).

Within the context of the DC Universe, John Ravenhair is a Native American born Black-Cloud-in-Morning and raised in Queens, New York. When his great-grandfather Bison-Black-as-Midnight-Sky is killed in a mugging, he becomes influences and possessed by his ancestor's spirit. This leads him to set about avenging the wrongs committed against the Native American people.[7] When removed from the angry spirit, he occasionally acts for good, but is frequently a threat to Firestorm.[8]

Black Flash

First appearance The Flash vol. 2, #138 (June 1998)
Created by Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, and Ron Wagner
Abilities Superhuman speed, time manipulation, role as psychopomp to speedsters

Black Flash is a death manifestation in the DC universe.

The character, created by Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, and Ron Wagner, first appeared in The Flash vol. 2, #138 (June 1998).

Within the context of the DC Universe, the Black Flash appears as an omen of death to those connected to the Speed Force. When it appears to claim Wally West and draw him back into the Speed Force, it is first delayed, taking Linda Park, then outrun.[9] It later reappears shortly before Bart Allen is killed by the Rogues.[10]

After the return of Barry Allen, a charred corpse is discovered that appears to be the Black Flash. While inspecting the remains, Barry temporarily becomes the replacement Black Flash due to Professor Zoom's tampering with the Speed Force.[11]

In other media

The character of the Black Flash was adapted for a mini-game in the Justice League Heroes: The Flash game for the Game Boy Advance. When the play dies in the main game, they are given a change to return to the game without the loss of a life if they are able to avoid being caught by the Black Flash.

Blacksmith

First appearance Flash: Iron Heights (2001)
Created by Geoff Johns and Ethan Van Sciver
Abilities Merge metal with flesh and shape it to her will
Aliases Amunet Black

Blacksmith is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Geoff Johns and Ethan Van Sciver, first appeared in Flash| Iron Heights (2001).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Blacksmith operates an underground black market know as the Network in Central City and Keystone City. Early in her career she is briefly married to Goldface. When they divorce, she steals some of the elixer that gives him his powers. She has it modified before drinking it and gains the ability reshape metal and merge it with flesh.[volume & issue needed]

Using the Network as a power base, she assembles a new team of Rogues to take control of the two cities. As her plan unfolds, she is able to isolate the two cities and almost defeats the Flash. Her victory unravels due to dissension among her Rogues and Goldface leading the populace of the cities against her. Her defeat results in the Network being closed down and her incarceration in Iron Heights.[12]

Brimstone

First appearance Legends #1 (November 1986)
Created by John Ostrander, Len Wein, and John Byrne

Brimstone is a supervillain and artificial construct in the DC universe.

The character, created by John Ostrander, Len Wein, and John Byrne, first appeared in Legends #1 (November 1986).[13]

Within the context of the DC Universe, Brimstone is initially created by Darkseid as a part of his plot to turn the population of Earth against their superheroes.[14] He does this by implanting a nuclear reactor with a "techno-seed" which modifies it to create the several story tall Brimstone. It is speculated by the heroes that that it is composed of superheated plasma.[15] Its initial rampage is ended by the Suicide Squad when Deadshot shoots out the creature's "heart".[16]

A handful of stories published much later have used Brimstone, though without fully explaining how the construct was recreated.

Powers and abilities

Due to its construction, Brimstone poses superhuman strength and endurance, generates extremely high temperatures, can produce bursts of flame, and can generate a giant flaming sword.

In other media

A giant nuclear-powered robot with the same appearance and powers appeared in the episode "Initiation" of the animated series Justice League Unlimited. This version of Brimstone is created by the Chinese as a defense against foreign powers, but goes on a rampage through the Chinese countryside. Green Arrow, Captain Atom, and Supergirl work together to defeat it by firing a dampening rod into its nuclear core.

The character of Brimstone was adapted for use in the direct to DVD animated film Superman/Batman: Public Enemies.

Brother Grimm

First appearance The Flash vol. 2, #166 (November 2000)
Created by Geoff Johns and Angel Unzueta

Brother Grimm is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Geoff Johns and Angel Unzueta, first appeared in The Flash vol. 2, #166 (November 2000).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Brother Grimm is the son of Brother Nightingale, the king in the alternate dimension of Eastwind. When Nightingale plans an invasion of Earth, Grimm sends a warning to the Flash. When the Flash along with Kid Flash and Jay Garrick stop the invasion, Nightingale is deposed and Grimm offered the crown. He takes the advice of Kid Flash to "follow his own path" and lets his brother Angar take the crown. Grimm, regretting taking the advice, is forced to take the crown and kill Angar when it becomes apparent he is no better than their father. The regret becomes rage when he learns that Wall, contrary to his own advice, has taken up the mantel of the Flash.[17]

To punish the Flash, Grimm enlists Mirror Master and Captain Cold to trap him in a mirror world while he removed Keystone City to Eastwind. He makes the mistake of double-crossing the Rogues who work with the Flash to escape the mirror world, rescue the citizens of Keystone, and defeat Grimm.[18]

Powers and abilities

Brother Grimm is a skilled sorcerer and warrior, able to create glamours that change his appearance and transport others between dimensions. He can also sense the use of extra dimensional forces such as the Speed Force.

C

Michelle Carter

First appearance Booster Gold #5 (June 1986)
Created by Dan Jurgens
Aliases Goldstar

Michelle Carter is a super hero in the DC universe.

The character, created by Dan Jurgens, first appeared in Booster Gold #5 (June 1986).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Michelle Carter is the twin sister of Michael Carter. She follows her brother from the 25th century back to the later 20th. She decides to explore the era and "borrows" the Goldstar costume.[19] During this exploration she acts like and dies as a super hero.[volume & issue needed]

Years later, subjectively, Rip Hunter rescues her by pulling her to the present from just before she was to die. This removed her "death" from the timeline.[20] From her perspective she was rescued in the nick of time and it is not until some time later that she learns that she had originally died. The revelation of this by Rex Hunter traumatizes her and leaves her obsessing on on the belief that she is now a "glitch" in the timeline.[21] Resenting Rip and Booster for having hidden her "real fate", she disables Skeets and disappears into the timestream.[22]

She resurfaces in Coast City just prior to its destruction by Mongul.[23] Booster is able to get her out of Coast City, but it costs her a new found boyfriend.[24] This results in her contemplating going back to the 25th century. When she informs Booster, he is able to convince her to remain with him and Rip.[25]

Cerdian

First appearance Aquaman vol. 5, #63 (January 2000)
Created by Dan Jurgens and Steve Epting
Species Atlantian

Cerdian is an infant in the DC universe.

The character, created by Dan Jurgens and Steve Epting, first appeared in Aquaman vol. 5, #63 (January 2000).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Cerdian is the son of Tempest and Dolphin. He is not seen after Infinite Crisis and is confirmed to have died during that event in Titans vol 2, #15 (September 2009).

Charybdis

First appearance Aquaman vol 5, #1 (August 1994)
Created by Peter David and Martin Egeland
Aliases Piranha-Man

Charybdis is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Peter David and Martin Egeland, first appeared in Aquaman vol 5, #1 (August 1994).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Charybdis and his wife, Scylla, are international terrorists who attempt to kill Aquaman. When Scylla is killed, Charybdis is driven mad by grief. He uses his ability to suppress metahuman abilities in others to defeat Aquaman and attempts to absord Aquaman's powers to himself. Partially successful, he is unable to control his new ability to communicate with fish and falls into a pool of piranha. Instead of being devoured, he melds with the fish, taking on many of their traits.

Chunk

First appearance The Flash vol. 2, #9 (February 1988)
Created by Mike Baron and Jackson Guice
Aliases Chester Runk

Chunk is a supporting character with super human powers in the DC universe.

The character, created by Mike Baron and Jackson Guice, first appeared in The Flash vol. 2, #9 (Febriuary 1988).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Chester Runk is a physicist, engineer, and child prodigy. At age 24 he invents a primitive long range teleportation device. Due to a lack of safety procedures, the device implodes and merges with him. This imparts him with super human strength and durability as well as the ability to teleport anywhere. In order to keep the machine from "eating" him, he is forced to absorb 47 times his own mass in super-dense matter.[26][27]

He first encounters the Flash while he is stealing diamonds to "feed" the machine.[26] During the confrontation, he sends the Flash to the "void", a rocky prehistoric wasteland that he has sent other who have crossed him. The Flash convinces him that he needs to return the people he has imprisoned to Earth.[28]

Over time Chunk becomes one of Wally West's friends and develops a degree of control over his abilities. He eventually opens a waste removal business believing "everyone has something they’d like to disappear".[volume & issue needed]

During her attempt to take over Central City and Keystone City, Blacksmith orders Plunder to shoot Chunk with a white dwarf matter bullet. This results in a rupture causing everything nearby to be sucked into him. The Flash is able to retrieve the bullet and the rupture closes.[29]

Powers and abilities

Because of the machine that he absorbed, Chunk has the ability to transfer matter to and from the "void", super human strength, limited invulnerability, and the ability to manipulate local gravimetric fields.

Alternate versions

A future version of Chunk was presented in Flash Annual #4 (1991). as part of the "Armageddon 2001" story arc.

Cicada

First appearance The Flash vol. 2, #171 (April 2001)
Created by Geoff Johns and Scott Kolins
Aliases David Hersch

Cicada is a supervillain and cultist in the DC universe.

The character, created by Geoff Johns and Scott Kolins, first appeared in The Flash vol. 2, #171 (April 2001).

Within the context of the DC Universe, sometime in the early 20th century, David Hersch murders his wife during a thunderstorm. Regretting this, he attempts to take his own life but is struck by lightning and has a vision: He has been chosen to live forever, and he will bring his wife back as well.[30][volume & issue needed]

Calling himself Cicada and keeping himself alive by transferring the life force of others to himself, Hersch accumulates followers and plans for the day when he will be able to resurrect his wife. To achieve his vision he faces a moral dilemma, he needs to sacrifice others to fuel the resurrection. While his followers would volunteer, he does not know if it would be enough. He finds an answer in the people who have been saved by the Flash. He sees the Flash as "a brother blessed by the lightning" and those who would have dies without the Flash's interference as lives he can take with a clear conscience.

Acting on this, he has his followers go into Keystone City and kill those the Flash has save with daggers that collect life energy. He also has Magenta bring the Flash to him to witness the resurrection. He briefly succeeds only to have his wife reveal his crime. The Flash is able to break free and in the ensuing fight Cicada drains the life of his followers and slashes Detective Morillo with his dagger before being captured.[30][volume & issue needed]

Powers and abilities

Cicada has the ability to steal the life-force of other living beings and use it to prolong his own life and regenerate physical damage. He carries a hilted blade capable of absorbing the life force of its victims in order to resurrect the dead.

Cobalt Blue

First appearance Speed Force #1 (November 1997)
Created by Mark Waid and Brian Augustyn
Aliases Malcolm Thawne

Cobalt Blue is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Mark Waid and Brian Augustyn, first appeared in Speed Force #1 (November 1997).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Malcolm Thawne is the twin brother of Barry Allen. At the time of their bith, the doctor delivering them had already accidentally killed the child of Charlene Thawne during delivery. To cover his mistake, the doctor gave one of the twins to the Thwanes as their own and told the Allens that their second son had been stillborn.[31][32]

Raised by the Thwane's as a con artist, Malcolm learns of his brother by accident as an adult. He learns the full story by confronting his "parents" and the doctor who delivered him, killing the latter in a rage. His grandmother, seeing true potential in his passion, teaches him the family secret of controlling the "blue flame". Eventually he crafts a blue gem to contain the flame. The creation is fulled by his rage and jealousy of his twin "stealing his life" and can siphon off the Flash's superspeed.[31][32]

His first confrontation with the Flash and Kid Flash results in the flame absorbing him.[33] Emerging years later, he shifts his focus onto his brother's "legacy" since Barry Allen had died to stop the Anti-Monitor while he was in the flame. His plan spans from the present to near the end of the 30th century, targeting the Flashes of various eras in between. His plan is undone by Wally West who skrits the edge of the speed force while carrying the shards of the blue gem. The power pouring into the gem overloads and destroys it.[34]

Trixie Collins

First appearance Booster Gold #1 (February 1986)
Created by Dan Jurgens
Aliases Goldstar

Trixie Collins is a office worker and super hero in the DC universe.

The character, created by Dan Jurgens, first appeared in Booster Gold #1 (February 1986).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Trixie Collins is hired by Booster Gold to be his personal assistant after he arrives in the 20th century.[35] When an anti-super hero mob threatens a weakened Booster's life, she reluctantly puts on the Goldstar costume that had been developed to give Booster a female sidekick.[36] After rescuing Booster, she accompanies him back to the 25th century to save his life and repower his costume. On their return to the 20th century, she gladly returns the Goldstar suit preferring her role as a personal assistant over that of super hero.[37]

Harriet Cooper

First appearance Detective Comics #328 (June 1964)
Created by Bill Finger and Sheldon Moldoff

Harriet Cooper is the maternal aunt of Dick Grayson in the DC universe.

The character, created by Bill Finger and Sheldon Moldoff, first appeared in Detective Comics #328 (June 1964).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Harriet Cooper is Dick Grayson's maternal aunt who comes to live at Wayne Manor after the death of Alfred Pennyworth. She involves herself in the both Garyson's and Bruce Wayne's daily lives and on occasion comes close to uncovering the secret identities. When Alfred returns from the dead, she remains at Wayne manor at his insistence.[38] Over time health problems reduces her activities and cause her to eventually leave Gotham City.

Despite the longstanding misconception that of having been created specifically for the television series Batman, the character had actually been used in the comics for two years and was adapted for television. The introduction in the comics was done in part to reduce the homosexual interpretations of the Wayne/Grayson relationship[citation needed]. Some details from the television series (her last name, her status as a widow) were added to the comic stories in Detective Comics #373 (March 1968).

D

Deep Blue

First appearance Aquaman vol. 5 #23 (August 1996)
Created by Peter David and Jim Calafiore
Abilities Able to breathe underwater, superhuman strength, control and resize sea life.
Aliases Debbie Perkins, Indigo

Deep Blue is a superhero in the DC universe.

The character, created by Peter David and Jim Calafiore, first appeared in Aquaman vol. 5 #23 (August 1996).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Deep Blue is the daughter of Tsunami and grew up believing Neptune Perkins to be her father while Rhombus believed her to be his daughter. She is among the heroes who respond Aquaman's call to unite the undersea kingdoms. Over time she begins to insist on being called Indigo and learns that Atlan claims to be her true father.

Albert Desmond

First appearance Showcase #13 (April 1958)
Created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino
Aliases Doctor Alchemy, Mister Element

Albert Desmond is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino, first appeared in Showcase #13 (April 1958) as Mister Element. His second, and more frequently used identity of Doctor Alchemy first appeared in Showcase #14 (June 1958).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Albert Desmond is a chemist who suffers from a multiple personality disorder with one law-abiding personality and another criminally inclined one. Under his darker personality he applies his knowledge of chemistry to create the identity of Mister Element, creating elemental weapons such as bulletproof silicon to shield his cars, and discovered a new element, Elemento, a magnetic light, with which he sent the Flash into space. After being sent to jail as a result of his first encounter with the Flash, he learns of the Philosopher's Stone from his cellmate. He escapes, finds the Stone, and uses its power to transmute one element to another to restart his criminal career as Doctor Alchemy.[39]

Over time he switches between the two identities, showing a preference for "Doctor Alchemy". Eventually his good personality resurfaces and he quits crime and hides the Stone. Shortly after a new Doctor Alchemy appears and is revealed to be his identical twin brother Alvin Desmond with whom he shares a psychic link.[volume & issue needed] This plot point was retconed in later stories to "Alvin" being a construct of the Stone created by Albert's criminal personality.[volume & issue needed] When Albert confronts and defeats "Alvin" he resumes the role of Doctor Alchemy.

While he has alternated between incarceration and freedom, equipment for both of his costumed identities have be used by others. Curtis Engstrom used the Philosopher's Stone as The Alchemist and Alexander Petrov resurrect Mister Element.

Powers and abilities

As Mister Element, Albert Desmond uses a weapon that can affect the structure of elements. As Doctor Alchemy he possesses the Philosopher's Stone which once belonged to Merlin. The Stone allows him to transmute any element into any other element. He can control the Stone from a distance with telekinesis.[39]

In other media

Both the Doctor Alchemy and Mister Element versions of the character were adapted for non-speaking cameos in the episode "Flash and Substance" of the animated series Justice League Unlimited.

Doctor No-Face

First appearance Detective Comics #319 (September 1963)
Created by Dave Wood and Sheldon Moldoff
Aliases Bart Magan

Doctor No-Face is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Dave Wood and Sheldon Moldoff, only appeared in Detective Comics #319 (September 1963).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Bart Magan attempts to remove a facial scare using an experimental device. When the device instead erases all his facial features he takes the name "Doctor No-Face" and starts a short lived crime spree in Gotham City.[40]

In other media

The character of Doctor No-Face was adapted for an appearance in the episode "A Bat Divided" of the animated series Batman: The Brave and the Bold.

Double Down

First appearance Flash: Iron Heights (2001)
Created by Geoff Johns and Ethan Van Sciver
Abilities Skin is made up of "cursed" playing cards which he can mentally remove and control.
Aliases Jeremy Tell

Double Down is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Geoff Johns and Ethan Van Sciver, first appeared in Flash: Iron Heights (2001). In an interview with Wizard Magazine, Johns mentioned that Double Down was the one Rogue he would have loved to devote more time to and describing the character as "...the one that got away."[volume & issue needed]

Within the context of the DC Universe, Jeremy Tell is a con artist and compulsive gambler. After losing all his money in a game he murders the gamble who walked away from the table with the most money. A cursed deck of cards owned by the man he murdered attacks him and bonds to his skin. He finds that he can mentally detach and direct the cards for various effects. Taking the name Double Down, he joins Keystone City's supervillain community.

Powers and abilities

The "cards" of the cursed deck have replaced Double Down's skin. He is able to mentally control them, detaching them from his body and directing their movement. He can use a card's razor edges to cut through objects, or to encase an opponent with his cards.

Cal Durham

First appearance Aquaman #57 (August–September 1977)
Created by David Michelinie and Jim Aparo
Species Augmented human
Abilities Superhuman strength and durability, enhanced low light eyesight, ability to breathe underwater.

Cal Durham is a former henchman of Black Manta and a public figure in the DC universe.

The character, created by David Michelinie and Jim Aparo, first appeared in Aquaman #57 (August–September).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Cal Durham is a mercenary hired by Black Manta under the pretense of establishing an African-American dominated underwater society. To this end, Durham undergoes surgical procedures to emulate Atlantian physiology. Discovering that Manta is more focused on destroying Aquaman than fulfilling his social promise, he rebels. This results in Manta attempting to kill him and Duhram reevaluating his goals. Much later he appears as the mayor of Sub Diego.

E

Curt Engstrom

First appearance Flash vol 2, #71 (December 1992)
Created by Mark Waid and Greg LaRocque
Aliases Alchemist -- Also used by Zobar Zodiak and Jan Arrah

Curt Engstrom is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Mark Waid and Greg LaRocque, first appeared in Flash vol 2, #71 (December 1992).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Curt Engstrom is a scientist working at S.T.A.R. Labs as a part of a team studying Doctor Alchemy's Philosopher's Stone. He steels the Stone but is captured and jailed before he can figure out how to use it. Escaping, he creates the identity of the Alchemist and uses the stone in an attempt to get revenge on the lawyer who betrayed him. He is instead recaptured by the Flash.[41][42]

F

False Face

First appearance Leading Comics #2 (Spring 1942)
Created by Mort Weisinger and Creig Flessel
Abilities Master of disguise

False Face is a name used by a number of different supervillains in the DC universe.

The concept and first character, created by Mort Weisinger and Creig Flessel, first appeared in Leading Comics #2 (Spring 1942) using the name "Falseface". The name was later adjusted to "False Face" mirroring minor characters introduced by Fawcett Comics and Timely Comics.

Variations of the character have been introduced in Batman #113 (February 1958) and Birds of Prey #112 (January 2008). In all instances the character is only identified as "False-Face" or by an alias while in disguise.

Golden Age characters

Within the context of the DC Universe, the False Face of the 1940s first appears as a small time crook recruited by the Black Star to form a criminal gang. False Face attempts to rob a Mardi Gras event in New Orleans and is apprehended by the Shining Knight. Much later he confronts the Star-Spangled Kid.[43]

A different False Face dies in a confrontation with Captain Marvel, Jr.[44] While not the same character as created for DC, the publisher would later license and eventually purchase the characters and stories Fawcett published. The material would be assigned to "Earth-S" within the continuity of the DC Universe.

Silver Age character

First appearance Batman #113 (February 1958)
Created by Sheldon Moldoff

Within the context of the DC Universe, the False Face of the late 1950s appears as an opponent of Batman and Robin who uses his skill to commit elaborate robberies involving the kidnapping of high profile individuals.

This version of the character was adapted in 1967 for a two episode story for the television series Batman. The role was preformed by Malachi Throne though the actor's face was obscured by a translucent plastic mask. This was further adapted for a number of appearances in the animated series Batman: The Brave and the Bold with Corey Burton providing the character's voice

Modern character

First appearance Birds of Prey #112 (January 2008)
Created by Tony Bedard and David Cole

Within the context of the DC Universe, the modern Falseface s a female mercenary who is contracted by the Calculator to kidnap and impersonate Lady Blackhawk in order to infiltrate the Birds of Prey.

In other media

Aside from adaptation of the Silver Age version of the character for television, the concept and name were adapted for an original character in the animated series Batman Beyond. This version actually has the ability to rearrange and mold his face to mimic others. The character appeared in the episode "Plague" voiced by Townsend Coleman.

Firehawk

First appearance The Fury of Firestorm #1 (June 1982)
Created by Gerry Conway and Pat Broderick
Abilities Flight; intangability; manipulation and projection of heat and radiation
Aliases Lorraine Reilly; Firestorm

Firehawk is a superhero in the DC universe.

The character, created by Gerry Conway
Pat Broderick, first appeared in The Fury of Firestorm #1 (June 1982) as Lorraine Reilly. Her transformation into Firehawk was presented in The Fury of Firestorm #17 (October 1983).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Lorraine Reilly is the daughter of United States Senator Walter Reilly. She is kidnapped by Multiplex on the orders of Henry Hewitt. Hewitt sujects her to experiments designed to recreate the accident that created Firestorm (comics) and Multiplex.[45] Dubed "Firehawk", she is used as a pawn against Firestorm. Over the course of The Fury of Firestorm, she becomes a supporting character and an intended romantic interest for Ronnie Raymond, one half of the composite hero.

Later stories have her retiring from super heroics,[46] entering politics, and becoming a Senator.[citation needed] The Raymonds and Firestorm re-enter her life when Ed Raymond asks her to investigate Jason Rusch, the new Firestorm. As a result of that investigation, for a short time she becomes Rusch's "partner" in the Firestorm matrix.

Fisherman

Fisherman is a name used by a number of different supervillains in the DC universe.

The concept and first character, created by Joe Greene and Stan Aschmeier, first appeared in All-American Comics #69 (November–December 1945) as a single use thief in the Doctor Mid-Nite strip.[47]

The name was reused for a single appearance character in Blackhawk #163 (August 1961),[48] and later for a character that became a recurring opponent of Aquaman.[49]

First appearance Aquaman #21 (May–June 1965)
Created by Henry Boltinoff and Nick Cardy.[50]

Within the context of the DC Universe, this latter Fisherman is originally presented as an international criminal specializing in the theft of rare objects and scientific inventions. He utilizes a high tech pressure suit, collapsible fishing rod, and gimmick "lures" in his crimes. While his identity is never revealed, enough is known about him for the Gotham City coroner to state that that a man wearing a copy of his equipment that is killed in Gotham is not the same person who faced Aquaman.[51]

A revised version of the character appeared in Aquaman: Sword of Atlantis story "Gate of Shadow" by Kurt Busiek. Within this story the Fisherman's helmet is revealed to be an alien parasite that grafts itself to an individual's head.[52] It has not been made clear if Busiek's story retconed the history of the character introduced in 1965 or not.

In other media

The Silver Age Aquaman related version of the character has been adapted for two television shows:

Folded Man

First appearance The Flash vol.2, #153 (October 1999)
Created by Mark Waid and Brian Augustyn
Aliases Edwin Gauss

Folded Man is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Mark Waid and Brian Augustyn, first appeared in The Flash vol.2, #153 (October 1999).

Within the context of the DC Universe, the Folded Man is Edwin Gauss, a physics student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology looking to definitively resolve Albert Einstein's Unified field theory. He invents of a device that allows interdimensional travel using proprietary software stolen from Norman Bridges. He incorporates this into a suit that allows its wearer to move across at least four dimensions.

When Bridges tries to take the technology, Gauss uses the suit to create the identity of the Folded Man to strike back at Bridges. The Flash is caught in the middle and winds up taking Gauss into custody.[53]

Powers and abilities

The Folded Man wears a suit that allows him to manipulate his personal dimensions. He can flatten to a two dimensional form which allows him to slice through objects more cleanly than the sharpest razor. By shifting into four dimensions, he can leave our plane and pop back anywhere he likes.

G

Gehenna

First appearance Villains United #5 (November 2005)
Created by Stuart Moore and Jamal Igle
Abilities Teleportation; limited telepathy
Aliases Gehenna Hewitt

Gehenna is a superhero in the DC universe.

The character, created by Stuart Moore and Jamal Igle, first appeared in Villains United #5, (November 2005).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Gehenna is a clone of Victor Hewitt who is rescued by Firestorm. Her telepathic ability is shown to be limited to those participating in the Firestorm matrix and strongest with Jason Rusch. She becomes a romantic interest for Rusch through Firestorm: The Nuclear Man volume 2 and a participant in the matrix. She is apparently killed by the Black Lantern Firestorm construct in Blackest Night #3 (September 2009).

Girder

First appearance Flash: Iron Heights (2001)
Created by Geoff Johns and Ethan Van Sciver
Aliases Tony Woodward

Girder is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Geoff Johns and Ethan Van Sciver, first appeared in Flash: Iron Heights (2001).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Tony Woodward causes a riot at the steel plant were he works when he assaults a female co-worker. He is thrown into a vat of molten steel which includes scraps from S.T.A.R. Labs experiments. These scraps convert his body into living iron and imbue him with superhuman strength and a high resistance to harm, though he does rust. Taking the name Girder, he is eventually sent to Iron Heights Penitentiary for a conviction on robbery charges.[54]

He is among the criminals that Blacksmith recruits as the new Rogues.

In other media

The character of Girder was adapted for the animated direct to DVD film Superman/Batman: Public Enemies.

H

Hila

First appearance Aquaman #22 (August 1965)
Created by Nick Cardy
Species Xebelian
Abilities Create and manipulate "hard" water
Aliases Siren

Hila is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Nick Cardy and an unnamed writer, first appeared in Aquaman #22 (August, 1965). When re-introduced in 2010, the alias "Siren" was applied to the character.

Within the context of the DC Universe, Hila is the twin sister of Mera and originally presented as the black sheep of her family who had been framed and exiled from their home dimension. Her first encounter with Aquaman and her sister results in her return home after she finds out her name had been cleared.

When next seen, she is called Siren and is in charge of a squad of elite Xebelian soldiers on a mission to kill Aquaman. This includes a retcon to Mera's history in that this was originally her solo mission.[55] During the course of her mission, Hila allies herself with Black Manta and is eventually imprisoned in the Bermuda Triangle.[volume & issue needed]

K

King Tut

First appearance Batman Confidential #26 (April 2009)
Created by Christina Weir, Nunzio DeFilippis, and José Luis García-López
Aliases Victor Goodman

King Tut is a supervillain in the DC universe based on the character of the same name from the television series Batman.

The character, created by Christina Weir, Nunzio DeFilippis, and José Luis García-López, first appeared in Batman Confidential #26 (April 2009).

Within the context of the DC Universe, King Tut is an alias created by Egyptologist Victor Goodman to murder the wealthy of Gotham City.

Kulak

First appearance All Star Comics #2 (Fall 1940)
Created by Jerry Siegel and Bernard Baily
Species Brztalian
Abilities Manipulation of magic

Kulak is a sorcerer and supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Jerry Siegel and Bernard Baily, first appeared in All Star Comics #2 (Fall 1940).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Kulak is the high priest of the dead planet Brztal who had been imprisoned on Earth in antiquity. When released by archeologists in 1940, he seeks to destroy the earth but is defeated by the Spectre.[56]

The character was not used again until 1983 when he appears in a three part story published in All-Star Squadron. And has been rarely used since.

L

Sam Lane

First appearance Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #13 (November 1959)
Created by Robert Bernstein and Kurt Schaffenberger

Sam Lane is a General in the United States Army and father of Lucy and Lois Lane in the DC universe.

The character, created by Robert Bernstein and Kurt Schaffenberger, first appeared in Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #13 (November 1959). The original character was presented as a horse farmer. When the character was re-introduced after Crisis on Infinite Earths, he was re-worked as an army General in Adventures of Superman #424 (January 1987) by Marv Wolfman and Jerry Ordway.

Within the context of the DC Universe, Sam Lane is a career military man holding the rank of General in the United States Army. During Lex Luthor's time as President of the United States, Lane serves as Secretary of Defense and apparently dies during the Imperiex War.[57] He later resurfaces as the head of Project 7734 during the Amazon attack on the United States where he orchestrates the rescue of his wounded daughter Lucy.[volume & issue needed] He oversees the drafting of Lex Luthor into the Project[volume & issue needed] and the outfitting of Lucy with a mystically powered suit[volume & issue needed] in a operation to deal with the Kandorians. This culminates in the destruction of New Krypton by using Reactron as a living bomb, which kills most of the Kandorians, and Luthor temporarily transforming the Earth's yellow sun red. In the aftermath he is confronted by Lois and Supergirl with Lois pointing out that by destroying New Krypton, he has become the very monster he claimed the Kryptonians to be. This coupled with Jimmy Olsen and Natasha Irons having released the Projects files and a full account of his activities to multiple news outlets via the internet, leads him to commit suicide rather than be held to account by an internation court.[58]

Alternate versions

  • The character is adapted, along with most Superman related characters, by Grant Morrison for All-Star Superman.

In other media

The character of Sam Lane has been adapted for films and television series based on Superman.

  • Superman (1978) included the character as a cameo role for Kirk Alyn.
  • All-Star Superman (2011) the animated adaptation of Morrison's limited series of the same name. The character was voiced by Steven Blum.
  • Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman adapted the character for a number of episodes as a cyberneticist rather than a military man. He was portrayed by Denis Arndt in his first appearance, later appearances were portrayed by Harve Presnell.
  • Superman: The Animated Series episode voiced by Dean Jones.
  • Smallville in episodes during the series' 4th and 10 seasons portrayed by Michael Ironside.

Lara

First appearance Superman comic strip (1939)[verification needed]
Created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster
Species Kryptonian

Lara is a Kryptonian and mother of Superman in the DC universe.

The character, created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, first appeared in the Superman newspaper strip in 1939 and later incorporated into the comic book stories.

Within the context of the DC Universe, Lara is the wife of Jor-El and mother of Superman. Her background and personality has varied over time as aspects of Superman's origin have been revised. Prior to the publication of Crisis on Infinite Earths she was presented as an astronaut and a warm and caring person. Afterwards she was revised as a cold and distant historian in The Man of Steel (1986) by John Byrne. In 2004, Superman: Birthright restored much of the pre-Crisis background and wrote her as Jor-El's equal and had her help in the design and construction of the craft used to send Superman to Earth. And when Superman: Secret Origin revised Krypton's society into a caste based system, she was made into a member of the bottom caste "Labor Guild" who had been elevated to the "Science Guild" by her marriage to Jor-El.

In other media

The character of Lara has been adapted for films and television series based on Superman.

Jim Lockhart

First appearance Crack Comics #1 (May 1940)
Created by Henry Kiefer
Aliases Red Torpedo

Jim Lockhart is a superhero in the DC universe.

The character, created by Henry Kiefer, first appeared in Crack Comics #1 (May 1940) published by Quality Comics. When Quality ceased publishing comics in late 1956, the character was among the intellectual properties National Periodical Publications purchased. The character was unused by DC until Roy Thomas picked him as one of half a dozen characters to use in All-Star Squadron #31 as a retconed "original" Freedom Fighters. While that story included the character's death, he was brought back in contemporary stories in Aquaman: Sword of Atlantis in 2007.

Within the context of the DC Universe, Jim Lockhart is an engineer who designs and builds a one-man submarine in 1940. Using the sub he patrolled the shores against modern day pirates and war time attacks.

M

Mister Element

First appearance Showcase #13 (April 1958)
Created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino

Mister Element is a name used by more than one supervillain in the DC universe.

The character concept, created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino, first appeared in Showcase #13 (April 1958).

It has been used for the characters of Albert Desmond and Alexander Petrov.

Peter Mortimer

First appearance Aquaman #37 (January 1968)
Created by Henry Boltinoff and Nick Cardy
Aliases Scavenger, Barracuda

Peter Mortimer is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Henry Boltinoff and Nick Cardy, first appeared in Aquaman #37 (January 1968).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Peter Mortimer is a deep-sea diver specializing in one-man salvage and piracy using a specially designed diving suit and underwater vehicle. At first this brings him into conflict with Aquaman as the Scavenger. The characters last two appearances show hie after leaving the life of a supervillain. Shaun McLaughlin shows him having become on of Aquaman's allies,[60] and William Messner-Loebs retcons the character into a mystic avatar of the barracuda and a clandestine pedophile.[61]

Molecule

First appearance Teen Titans vol. 3, #38 (September 2006)
Created by Geoff Johns and Carlos Ferreira
Abilities Ability to shrink.

Molecule is a super hero in the DC universe.

The character, created by Geoff Johns and Carlos Ferreira, first appeared in Teen Titans vol. 3, #38 (September 2006).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Molecule is a teen super hero patterned after the The Atom and a member of the Teen Titans during the "one-year gap" between the Infinite Crisis series and the "One Year Later" storylines. He is one of a group of teen heroes attacked by the Terror Titans and put in the arena of the Dark Side Club. While trying to escape he is chopped in two by the Persuader.[62]

Multiplex

First appearance Firestorm #1 (March 1978)
Created by Gerry Conway and Al Milgrom
Abilities Self duplication, super strength
Aliases Danton Black

Multiplex is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Gerry Conway and Al Milgrom, first appeared as Danton Black in Firestorm #1 (March 1978) and as Multiplex in Firestorm #2 (April 1978).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Danton Black is a nuclear physicist who worked as Martin Stein's assistant in the designing of the Hudson Nuclear Facility. Feeling that he is not receiving his due credit, he begins stealing lab equipment. When he is caught by Stein and fired, he publicly accuses Stein of stealing his designs for the power plant. He breaks into the plant to steal blueprints to fabricate evidence on the same night that Stein attempts to bring it on line. Caught in the same explosion that fuses Stein and Ronnie Raymond in to Firestorm, he gains the ability to split himself in to identical duplicates.[63]

N

Non

First appearance Action Comics #845 (January 2007)
Created by Geoff Johns, Richard Donner, and Adam Kubert
Species Kryptonian

Non is a Kryptonian supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Geoff Johns, Richard Donner, and Adam Kubert, first appeared in Action Comics #845 (January 2007). The character is an adaptation of the character of the same name that appeared on Superman and Superman II

Within the context of the DC Universe, Non is a former friend and scientific colleague of Jor-El. After leading a separatist movement, he is abducted and lobotomized by Krypton's Science Council. This leaves him a minimally-verbal and highly aggressive brute. Some aspects of his personality survive and surface as an extreme kindness when dealing with children. Serving as Zod's enforcer he also becomes guardian and caregiver for Zod's son, Chris Kent.

In other media

The original character from the 1978 and 1980 films was portrayed by Jack O'Halloran. He is mute, except for grunting.

O

Chief O'Hara

First appearance World's Finest Comics #159 (August 1966)
Created by Edmond Hamilton and Curt Swan

Chief O'Hara is a member of the Gotham City Police Department in the DC universe based on the character of the same name from the television series Batman.

The character, created by Edmond Hamilton and Curt Swan, first appeared in World's Finest Comics #159 (August 1966).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Chief O'Hara is the chief of police during the early days of Batman's career.

P

Neptune Perkins

First appearance Flash Comics #66 (August 1945)
Created by Gardner Fox and Joe Kubert
Teams All-Star Squadron; Young All-Stars
Abilities Enhanced ocean adapted physiology, ability to speak with marine mammals

Neptune Perkins is a superhero in the DC universe.

The character, created by Gardner Fox and Joe Kubert, first appeared in Flash Comics #66 (August 1945). That and a follow up story in 1947 were the character's only appearances until Roy Thomas revived him for an All-Star Squadron story in 1984 and later selected him as one of focal characters of Young All-Stars in 1987. In addition, Thomas expanded the character's backstory and origin so that it incorporated large chunks of The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket by Edgar Allan Poe and Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne.

Within the context of the DC Universe, Neptune Perkins is a mutant born with attributes that lend themselves to living at sea. During World War II he works with the All-Star Squadron. After the war he weds Miya Shimada, though this relationship becomes strained in part by his being unaware that he is not the father of ther daughter, Debbie. In more recent years, after being elected to the United States Senate he has acted as a governmental contact for Aquaman and Young Justice.

Alexander Petrov

First appearance The Flash vol. 2, #202 (November 2003)
Created by Geoff Johns and Alberto Dose
Aliases Mister Element

Alexander Petrov is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Geoff Johns and Alberto Dose, first appeared in The Flash vol. 2, #202 (November 2003).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Alexander Petrov is a criminologist working for the Keystone City Police Department. In order to advance his career he uses one of weapons Albert Desmond used as Mister Element to freeze the lab supervisor solid. Petrov is promoted to replace the dead supervisor and discovers he likes the thrill of killing. He continues to eliminate members of the department he sees as "threats" to his position using the weapon and ice based effects. He uses the effects and his position as head of the crime lab to shift suspicion to Captain Cold. His plan comes undone when profiler Ashley Zolomon enters his officce as he is putting on his mask. The Flash is able to stop him from killing her but Captain Cold interrupts them before the Flash can take him into custody. Cold kills Petrov for breaking the Rogues' code of "ethics" - framing another Rogue for your own crimes.[64]

Pozhar

First appearance Fury of Firestorm #62 (August 1987)
Created by John Ostrander and Joe Brozowski
Aliases Mikhail Arkadin

Pozhar (Пожар or "Fire") is a Russian superhero in the DC universe.

The character, created by John Ostrander and Joe Brozowski, first appeared in Fury of Firestorm #62, (August 1987).[65]

Within the context of the DC Universe, Mikhail Arkadin is a nuclear technician who worked at the Chernobyl nuclear power generating plant. As a result of the accident at the plant's #4 reactor, he is imbued with the ability to convert mater into energy. He is requited by Major Zastrow of the Red Shadows as one of the Soviet Union's official superheroes.

Puzzler

First appearance Action Comics #49 (June 1942)
Created by Jerry Siegel and John Sikela

Puzzler is a name used by two supervillains in the DC universe.

The concept and original character, created by Jerry Siegel and John Sikela, first appeared in Action Comics #49 (June 1942). The concept was later revamped for the character Valerie Van Haaften.

Within the context of the DC Universe, the original Puzzler is an unnamed non-costumed criminal who is highly skilled in in parlor games and puzzles and operates a protection racket in Metropolis.

This character, along with most of the Golden Age Superman material was later assigned to the "Earth-Two" continuity of DC's in-story "multiverse". This material was later removed from the in-story continuity as part of Crisis on Infinite Earths. The name "Puzzler" was re-sued for a new character in 2002.

In other media

The character was adapted for a two episode story for the second season of the television series Batman and portrayed by Maurice Evans. The episodes had originally been written for the Riddler portrayed by Frank Gorshin. Since Gorshin was in a contract dispute with the series producers, the script was rewritten as the Puzzler.[66]

Q

Qwsp

First appearance Aquaman #1 (January–February 1962)
Created by Jack Miller and Nick Cardy
Species Imp
Aliases Quisp

Quisp or Qwsp is a mystical water sprite and imp in the DC universe.

The character, created by Jack Miller and Nick Cardy, first appeared in Aquaman #1 (Jan-Feb 1962). He was revised by Grant Morrison for the "Crisis Times Five" story arc published in JLA in 1999.

Within the context of the DC Universe, Quisp is a water sprite from the fifth dimension that befriends Aquaman and joins him on a number of adventures. Years later he remakes himself into a threat and convinces the imp Lkz to attack the third dimension. His plot is thwarted by the Justice League and Justice Society.[67]

Powers and abilities

Quisp can manipulate time and matter with a thought and can impose new laws of physics just by thinking.

R

Red Torpedo

First appearance Red Tornado vol 2, #1 (November 2009)
Created by Kevin VanHook and Jose Luis
Abilities Superhuman strength, flight, ability to control liquids.

Red Torpedo is a name used by two characters in the DC universe which share little but the name.

The first character, Jim Lockhart, was created for Quality Comics in 1940 and was among the properties DC acquired around late 1956 or early 1957.

The latter character, created by Kevin VanHook and Jose Luis, first appeared in Red Tornado vol 2, #1 (November 2009).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Red Torpedo is an android created by T.O. Morrow and the second based on the classical elements. When she rebels against Morrow's control and he deactivates her and hides her in a shipwreck at Pearl Harbor. When Red Tornado recovers her, she provides him with information about Red Volcano and Red Inferno.

In other media

Both characters were adapted for the Young Justice episode "Humanity". For the episode the Quality character was used as the "human" identity of Morrow's first android. This carried through to the android appearing male rather than female as the later comic book character was.

S

Scavenger

Scavenger is the name used by two unrelated characters in the DC universe.

The first character, Peter Mortimer, debuted in Aquaman #37 (January 1968).

First appearance Superboy #2 (March 1994)
Created by Karl Kesel and Tom Grummett
Abilities Superhuman longevity

The later character, created by Karl Kesel and Tom Grummett, first appeared in Superboy #2 (March 1994).

Within the context of the DC Universe, the Scavenger introduced in Superboy is an old man who is stockpiling all manner of devices and weapons. He operates under a impending attack from an unnamed enemy from his past, and believes that anyone opposing him is working for this enemy.

Shango

First appearance Firestorm the Nuclear Man #95 (March 1990)
Created by John Ostrander and Tom Mandrake
Abilities African Storm God, wields a magical stone labrys
Aliases Shango

Shango is an adaptation of the deity Sàngó from the Yorùbá religion for the DC universe.

The character, adapted by John Ostrander and Tom Mandrake, first appeared in Firestorm the Nuclear Man #95 (March 1990).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Shango is a deity and the war chief of the Orishas. He is responsible for asking Ogun to sever the Golden Chain linking Ifé, the land of the gods, with Earth. He is also responsible with restoring it in modern times. When he leads the reemergence of the pantheon in Africa, he encounters Firestorm. He and the pantheon are taken to task by Firestorm for their abandonment of Africa.[68]

Siren

First appearance Titans #5 (July 1999)
Created by Devin K. Grayson and Mark Buckingham
Species Mermaid
Teams Tartarus
Abilities Hypnotic voice, ability to breath underwater and transform her tail into legs.

Siren is a name used be two characters in the DC universe.

The original character, created by Devin K. Grayson and Mark Buckingham, first appeared in Titans #5 (July 1999).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Siren is a mermaid who originally acts as an eco-terrorist trying to bar mankind from the oceans. She is recruited by Vandal Savage for his team Tartarus.

In Brightest Day #5 the name was applied to Hila, a character which had first appearaed in 1965.[55]

In other media

A character of the same name appeared in the series Batman portrayed by Joan Collins. This character was later adapted for an appearance in the animated series Batman: The Brave and the Bold.

Stalnoivolk

First appearance Firestorm the Nuclear Man #67 (January 1988)
Created by John Ostrander and Joe Brozowski
Abilities Super human strength, durability, and longevity
Aliases Ivan Illyich Gort

Stalnoivolk (Стальнойволк or "Steel Wolf") is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by John Ostrander and Joe Brozowski, first appeared in Firestorm the Nuclear Man #67 (January 1988).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Ivan Illyich Gort is a Russian born in the 1900s who underwent government experiments during World War II. He loyaly serves the Soviet Union under the codename "Stalnoivolk" as a symbol of Russia's resistance to Nazi Germany. After the death of Joseph Stalin, he is exiled to Siberia for his participation in the purging of the Ukraine.[69]

He is reactivated just before the Soviet Union dissolves by Major Zastrow, leader of the Red Shadows. Initially he is tasked with eliminating Firestorm, which becomes a mission he cannot complete. He also encounters the Suicide Squad more than once.

T

Tokamak

First appearance The Fury of Firestorm #15 (August 1983)
Created by Gerry Conway and Pat Broderick
Aliases Henry Hewitt, Victor Hewitt

Tokamak is a supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Gerry Conway and Pat Broderick, first appeared in The Fury of Firestorm #15 (August 1983) as Henry Hewitt and became Tokamak in The Fury of Firestorm #18 (November 1983).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Tokamak is the identity taken by Henry Hewitt, the Chief Executive Officer of the Hewitt Corporation and high level director in the 2000 Committee, after subjecting himself to a recreation of the accident that created Firestorm.[70] Much later, in order a terminal disease, he created a clone of himself which he merged with. He creates the identity of "Victor Hewitt" in order to inherit his own company and sets out to create nuclear meltdowns across the globe to empower himself. He is stopped by Firestorm, Firehawk, and Pozhar. He is killed when Firestorm separates him from his clone.[71]

Powers and abilities

Tokamak has the ability to trap objects in energy rings and either compress them or break down their structural integrity.

Topo

First appearance Adventure Comics #229 (October 1956)
Created by Ramona Fradon
Species Octopus

Topo is a octopus sidekick to Aquaman in the DC universe.

The character, created by an unnamed writer and Ramona Fradon, first appeared in Adventure Comics #229 (October 1956).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Topo has appeared in two distinct forms. In Silver Age stories he is an octopus with shown to have near human intelligence who Aquaman chooses to be one of his sidekicks. After Infinite Crisis he is reworked as a humanoid octopus for Aquaman: Sword of Atlantis.

Powers and abilities

For the most part, Topo is an extremely talented Octopus. For an animal, he displayed remarkable intelligence and problem solving skills. He was also shown to have been trained in archery, and to play multiple musical instruments simultaneously.

In other media

The version from Aquaman: Sword of Atlantis was adapted for the animated series Young Justice episode "Downtime", voiced by James Arnold Taylor.

Tsunami

First appearance All-Star Squadron #33 (May 1984)
Created by Roy Thomas and Rick Hoberg
Abilities Superhuman strength; able to swim at superhuman speed, ability to create and control tidal waves.
Aliases Miya Shimada

Tsunami is a superhero in the DC universe.

The character, created by Roy Thomas and Rick Hoberg, first appeared in All-Star Squadron #33 (May 1984).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Tsunami is a nisei who grew up in Santa Barbara, California prior to World War II. Due to the racial prejudice against Japanese-Americans she suffered in the period leading up to the entry of America into the war, she joins the cause of the Imperial Japanese government. Over time she becomes disillusioned by the dishonorable conduct of those she is working with and eventually changes sides. In stories set in contemporary settings she has a daughter, Debbie, who she raised with Neptune Perkins.

U

Ursa

First appearance Action Comics #845 (January 2007)
Created by Geoff Johns, Richard Donner, and Adam Kubert
Species Kryptonian

Ursa is a Kryptonian supervillain in the DC universe.

The character, created by Geoff Johns, Richard Donner, and Adam Kubert, first appeared in Action Comics #845 (January 2007). The character is an adaptation of the character of the same name that appeared on Superman and Superman II

Within the context of the DC Universe, Ursa is the lover of General Zod and mother of Chris Kent. After Non is lobotomized by the Science Council, she instigated open rebellion along with Zod. As a result, the three were exiled to the Phantom Zone.

In other media

The original character from the 1978 and 1980 films was portrayed by Sarah Douglas.

V

Valerie Van Haaften

First appearance Superman vol. 2, #187 (December 2002)
Created by Geoff Johns and Pascual Ferry
Abilities Composed of living "puzzel pieces"
Aliases Puzzler

Valerie Van Haaften is a supervillain in the DC universe who took the name "Puzzler".

The character, created by Geoff Johns and Pascual Ferry, first appeared in Superman vol. 2, #187 (December 2002).

Within the context of the DC Universe, Valerie Van Haaften is a Superman fan who attempted to join a number of super groups to meet him. She eventually decides to become a villain to get his attention. Later she his hired by Intergang to assassinate Clark Kent.

Z

Zor-El

First appearance Action Comics #252 (May 1959)
Created by Otto Binder and Al Plastino
Species Kryptonian

Zor-El is a Kryptonian and father of Supergirl in the DC universe.

The character, created by Otto Binder and Al Plastino, first appeared in Action Comics #252 (May 1959).

Within the context of the DC Universe, three distinct versions of Zor-El have been presented but in each case he is the father of Superman's cousin. The character as first introduced survives the destruction of Krypton along with his wife, Alura, and the rest of Argo City. Years later, when a second catastrophe threatens to destroy Argo City, he and his wife send their daughter, born long after the destruction of Krypton, to Earth. Later stories reveal that Zor-El and Alura had escaped the destruction of Argo City in a "survival zone" to be reunited with their grown daughter.

A variation, named Zor-L, appeared in Showcase #98 (March 1978) in a story set in the publisher's Earth-Two continuity as the father of Power Girl.

Both of these versions of the character were removed from in-story continuity as part of Crisis on Infinite Earths along with most of the material related to Supergirl and the Earth-Two version of Superman.

When the Kara Zor-El version of Supergirl was re-introduced in "The Supergirl from Krypton" in 2004,[1] Zor-El was also re-introduced. In this version Zor-El, a noted artist, and Alura, a scientist, send their daughter to Earth during the destruction of Krypton, intending her to help raise her infant cousin. He survives the destruction along with the rest of Argo City due to a protective dome around it constructed by Alura. He is also among those not killed as "duplicate information" when Brainiac merges Argo City with the previously shrunken Kandor. Zor-El is reunited with his daughter when Kandor is restored in the story arc "New Krypton". During the arc he is killed by Reactron[72] which sets up limited series and arcs Superman: World of New Krypton, "Last Stand of New Krypton", and Superman: War of the Supermen. During Blackest Night, a crossover storyline that ran concurrently with Superman: World of New Krypton, he is among the dead resurrected as Black Lanterns.[73]

In other media

The character of Zor-El has been adapted for appearances in a number of other media presentations based on the Superman characters.

Zuggernaut

First appearance Firestorm the Nuclear Man #69 (March 1988)
Created by John Ostrander and Joe Brozowski
Abilities Super human strength, near invulnerability, energy discharge, claws
Aliases Matvei Rodor

Zuggernaut is a supervillain and symbiotic alien life form in the DC universe.

The character, created by John Ostrander and Joe Brozowski, first appeared in Firestorm the Nuclear Man #69 (March 1988).

Within the context of the DC Universe, the Zuggernaut crashes to earth as a meteorite in Russia. It was found by, and bonded to Matvei Rodor, a black marketeer. Rodor is in conflict with a corrupt Moscow prosecutor named Soliony and agrees to the Zuggernaut's offer of help in exchange for being its host.

Returning to Moscow, they attack Soliony, who has been interrogating Mikhail Arkadin. Arkadin summons Firestorm and escapes the jail to find the Zuggernaut threatening Soliony. The Zuggernaut is driven off when Firestorm when Storm burns imprisons of his hand into their chest.[74]

The Zuggernaut reappears a short time later and allows itself to be captured in order to get to Soliony. Again Firestorm intervenes, creating discord for the host and alien.[75] Their fight with Firestorm is interrupted by Stalnoivolk, allowing Rodor to override the Zuggernaut's desire to fight Firestorm and chase after Soliony. They in turn are delayed by the Russian super-team Soyuz, allowing Firestorm to catch up and stop them. This results in Rodor being mortally woundes and the Zuggernaut withdrawing to find a new host.[76]

Powers and abilities

When bonded with a host, the Zuggernaut can take the form of a tall, purple alien creature possessing long sharp claws and fangs. It also has a green gemstone embedded in its forehead which is capable of firing energy beams. The Zuggernaut could also project beams of energy from his eyes and had the ability to leap great distances.

See also

References

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