Puttee


Puttee

:"Distinguish from putty."A puttee, also spelled "puttie", is the name, adapted from the Hindi "patti", bandage (Skr. "patta", strip of cloth), for a covering for the lower part of the leg from the ankle to the knee, consisting of a long narrow piece of cloth wound tightly and spirally round the leg, and serving both as a support and protection, worn especially by riders, and taking the place of the leather or cloth gaiter. It was once adopted as part of the uniform of foot and mounted soldiers in several armies, including the United States Army and the armies of the British Commonwealth.

"The Blue Puttees" and "The Glamour Boys"

Two current Canadian infantry regiments were given nicknames based on non-standard puttees they wore: The Royal Newfoundland Regiment and the 48th Highlanders of Canada.

At the outbreak of World War I the Dominion of Newfoundland raised a regiment to fight. Lacking a local militia or garrison of soldiers, there were no military stores; uniforms had to be fashioned from scratch. Lacking khaki broadcloth, puttees were fashioned from blue broadcloth. The Newfoundland Regiment was thus nicknamed "The Blue Puttees".

During World War II, 1 Brigade of the 1st Canadian Division was being inspected by King George VI; there were not enough regulation khaki puttees for issue, so the 48th Highlanders made do with unofficial blue ones. The King inquired as to why the 48th wore different puttees from the rest of the brigade; he was told of the shortage. The King replied that he liked the blue puttees better and that they should keep them. The 48th Highlanders continued to wear blue puttees until battledress was eventually phased out. For their daring battlefield fashion the other units nicknamed the 48th Highlanders "The Glamour Boys".

References

*1911

Link

* [http://www.hardscrabblefarm.com/80th/putting_on_puttees.htm How to put on a Puttee]


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Puttee — Put tee, [Hind. pa[.t][.t]i ribbon, brace, tie.] A kind of gaiter of waterproof cloth wrapped around the leg, used by soldiers, etc. [Written also {putty}, {puttie}.] [Webster 1913 Suppl.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • puttee — 1875, from Hindi patti “band, bandage,” related to Skt. patta “strip of cloth.” …   Etymology dictionary

  • puttee — ► NOUN ▪ a long strip of cloth wound spirally round the leg from ankle to knee for protection and support. ORIGIN Hindi, band, bandage …   English terms dictionary

  • puttee — [pə tē′, put′ē] n. [Hindi paṭṭī, bandage < Sans paṭṭikā < paṭṭa, strip of cloth] a covering for the lower leg, in the form of a cloth or leather gaiter or a cloth strip wound spirally …   English World dictionary

  • puttee — /pu tee , poo , put ee/, n. 1. a long strip of cloth wound spirally round the leg from ankle to knee, worn esp. formerly as part of a soldier s uniform. 2. a gaiter or legging of leather or other material, as worn by soldiers, riders, etc. Also,… …   Universalium

  • puttee — Putty Put ty, n.; pl. {Putties}. [Written also {puttee}, {puttie}.] [Hind. pa[.t][.t]i ribbon, brace, tie.] A kind of gaiter of waterproof cloth wrapped around the leg, used by soldiers, etc. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • puttee — noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu paṭṭī strip of cloth, from Sanskrit paṭṭikā Date: 1886 1. a cloth strip wrapped around the leg from ankle to knee 2. a usually leather legging secured by a strap or catch or by laces …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • puttee — noun a) A strip of cloth wound round the leg for protection. b) Legging …   Wiktionary

  • puttee — put|tee [ˈpʌti US pʌˈti:] n [C usually plural] [Date: 1800 1900; : Hindi; Origin: patti long piece of cloth ] a long piece of cloth that soldiers wrapped around each leg from the knee down, as part of their uniform in the past …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • puttee — put·tee || pÊŒtɪ n. gaiter, leather covering worn around the lower leg (also putty) …   English contemporary dictionary


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