112th United States Congress


112th United States Congress
112th United States Congress
Capitol Building Full View.jpg
United States Capitol (2007)

Duration: January 3, 2011 – January 3, 2013

Senate President: Joe Biden (D)
Senate Pres. pro tem: Daniel Inouye (D)
House Speaker: John Boehner (R)
Members: 100 Senators
435 Representatives
6 Non-voting members
Senate Majority: Democratic Party
House Majority: Republican Party

Sessions
1st: January 5, 2011[1] – present
<111th 113th>

The One Hundred Twelfth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It convened in Washington, D.C. on January 3, 2011, and will end on January 3, 2013, close to the end of the presidential term to which Barack Obama was elected in 2008. Senators elected to regular terms in 2006 will complete those terms in this Congress. This Congress includes the last House of Representatives elected from congressional districts that were apportioned based on the 2000 census.

In the 2010 midterm elections, the Republican Party won the majority in the House of Representatives. While the Democrats kept their Senate majority, it was reduced from the previous Congress.[2] This is the first Congress in which the House and Senate are controlled by different parties since the 107th Congress of 2001–2003, and the first Congress to begin that way since the 99th Congress of 1985–1987. In this Congress, the House of Representatives has the largest number of Republican members, 242, since the 80th Congress (1947–1949).[3]

Contents

Major events

President Obama delivered the 2011 State of the Union Address on January 25, 2011
  • January 6, 2011: On the second day of the 112th Congress, the House of Representatives read a modified version of the U.S. Constitution, a historic first.[4]
  • January 8, 2011: 2011 Tucson shooting: Representative Gabrielle Giffords and nineteen other people were shot by a gunman in Tucson, Arizona. Six of them, including U.S. District Judge John Roll, died. Votes on the House floor were suspended for one week as a result of the shooting.
  • January 25, 2011: 2011 State of the Union Address
  • November 6, 2012: 2012 general elections scheduled

Potential government shutdown

A failure to pass a 2011 federal budget nearly led to a shutdown of non-essential government services on April 9, 2011, with the furlough of 800,000 government employees appearing imminent.[5] President Obama met Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and House Speaker John Boehner in the days preceding the deadline but was unable to come to an agreement to pass a budget.[citation needed] A one-week budget was proposed to avoid a government shutdown and allow more time for negotiations; however, proposals from both parties could not be accommodated.[citation needed] Obama said he would veto a proposed Republican budget over Republican social spending cuts.[citation needed] This was also backed by Senate Democrats who objected to such cuts as that of Planned Parenthood.[6][7][8] However, an agreement was reached between the two parties for a one-week budget to allow for more time to negotiate after Republicans dropped their stance on the Planned Parenthood issue.[7] The two parties ultimately agreed on a 2011 federal budget the following week.[citation needed]

There were many reactions to the possible shutdown with some saying the economy could be hurt during a fragile recovery[9] and others saying the lack of an unnecessary bureaucracy would not be noticed.[10] There was also criticism that while senators and representatives would continue to get paid others such as the police and military personnel would either not be paid for their work or have their payments deferred.[11]

Debt limit crisis

On August 2, 2011, the United States public debt was projected to reach its statutory maximum. Without an increase in that limit the U.S. Treasury would be unable to borrow money to pay its bills. Although previous statutory increases have been routine, conservative members of the House refused to allow an increase without drastically reducing government spending. Over several weeks and months, negotiators from both parties, both houses, and the White House worked to forge a compromise. The House passed the compromise bill, the Budget Control Act of 2011, on August 1, 2011 and the Senate passed it on August 2.

Major legislation

Enacted

Proposed

See also: Active Legislation, 112th Congress, via senate.gov

Select committees

Party summary

Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section, below.

Senate

Senate Party standings (at the beginning of this Congress)
  51 Democrats
  2 Independents, both caucusing with Democrats
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total Vacant
Democratic Independent Republican
End of previous congress 56 2 42 100 0
Begin 51 2 47 100 0
May 3, 2011 46 99 1
May 9, 2011 47 100 0
Latest voting share 53% 47%

House of Representatives

House Party standings (at the beginning of this Congress)
  193 Democrats
  242 Republicans
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total Vacant
Democratic Republican
End of previous congress 255 179 434 1
Begin 193 242 435 0
February 9, 2011 241 434 1
February 28, 2011 192 433 2
May 9, 2011 240 432 3
May 24, 2011 193 433 2
June 21, 2011 192 432 3
July 12, 2011 193 433 2
August 3, 2011 192 432 3
September 13, 2011 242 434 1
Latest voting share 44.2% 55.8%
Non-voting members 6 0 6 0

Leadership

[ Section contents: Senate: Majority (D), Minority (R)House: Majority (R), Minority (D) ]

Senate

President of the Senate
Joe Biden (D)
President pro tempore of Senate
Daniel Inouye (D)

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

House of Representatives

Speaker of the House
John Boehner (R)

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

Members

Senate

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Current party membership by state
  2 Democrats
  1 Democrat and 1 Republican
  2 Republicans
  193ABE box with 1px wide black border.png 1 Independent and 1 Democrat
Majority Leader of the Senate
Harry Reid (D)
Minority Leader of the Senate
Mitch McConnell (R)
Majority Whip of the Senate
Dick Durbin (D)
Minority Whip of the Senate
Jon Kyl (R)

House of Representatives

Section contents: Alabama — Alaska — Arizona —Arkansas — California — Colorado — Connecticut — Delaware — Florida — Georgia — Hawaii — Idaho — Illinois — Indiana — Iowa — Kansas — Kentucky — Louisiana — Maine — Maryland — Massachusetts — Michigan — Minnesota — Mississippi — Missouri — Montana — Nebraska — Nevada — New Hampshire — New Jersey — New Mexico — New York — North Carolina — North Dakota — Ohio — Oklahoma — Oregon — Pennsylvania — Rhode Island — South Carolina — South Dakota — Tennessee — Texas — Utah — Vermont — Virginia — Washington — West Virginia — Wisconsin — Wyoming — Non-voting members

Alabama

(6–1 Republican)

Alaska

(1 Republican)

Arizona

(5–3 Republican)

Arkansas

(3–1 Republican)

California

(34–19 Democratic)

Colorado

(4–3 Republican)

Connecticut

(5 Democrats)

Delaware

(1 Democrat)

Florida

(19–6 Republican)

Georgia

(8–5 Republican)

Hawaii

(2 Democrats)

Idaho

(2 Republicans)

Illinois

(11–8 Republican)

Indiana

(6–3 Republican)

Iowa

(3–2 Democratic)

Kansas

(4 Republicans)

Kentucky

(4–2 Republican)

Louisiana

(6–1 Republican)

Maine

(2 Democrats)

Maryland

(6–2 Democratic)

Massachusetts

(10 Democrats)

Michigan

(9–6 Republican)

Minnesota

(4–4 split)

Mississippi

(3–1 Republican)

Missouri

(6–3 Republican)

Montana

(1 Republican)

Nebraska

(3 Republicans)

Nevada

(2-1 Republican)

New Hampshire

(2 Republicans)

New Jersey

(7–6 Democratic)

New Mexico

(2–1 Democratic)

New York

(21–8 Democratic)

North Carolina

(7–6 Democratic)

North Dakota

(1 Republican)

Ohio

(13–5 Republican)

Oklahoma

(4–1 Republican)

Oregon

(3–1 Democratic, 1 vacant)

Pennsylvania

(12–7 Republican)

Rhode Island

(2 Democrats)

South Carolina

(5–1 Republican)

South Dakota

(1 Republican)

Tennessee

(7–2 Republican)

Texas

(23–9 Republican)

Utah

(2–1 Republican)

Vermont

(1 Democrat)

Virginia

(8–3 Republican)

Washington

(5–4 Democratic)

West Virginia

(2–1 Republican)

Wisconsin

(5–3 Republican)

Wyoming

(1 Republican)

Non-voting members

(6 Democrats)

Members' party membership by district.
  Democratic
  Republican
Freshman class of the House of Representatives, January 2011
Majority Leader of the House
Eric Cantor (R)
Minority Leader of the House
Nancy Pelosi (D)
Majority Whip of the House
Kevin McCarthy (R)
Minority Whip of the House
Steny Hoyer (D)

Changes in membership

Senate

State
(class)
Former senator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
installation
Nevada
(1)
John Ensign
(R)
Resigned May 3, 2011 due to an Ethics Committee investigation.[17]
The appointed successor will serve for the remainder of the term that ends with this Congress.
Dean Heller
(R)[18]
May 9, 2011[19]

House of Representatives

District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
installation
New York 26th Christopher Lee
(R)
Resigned February 9, 2011, due to a personal scandal.[20]
A special election was held May 24, 2011.[21]
Kathy Hochul
(D)
June 1, 2011
California 36th Jane Harman
(D)
Resigned February 28, 2011 to become the head of the Woodrow Wilson Center.[22]
A special election was held July 12, 2011.[23]
Janice Hahn
(D)
July 19, 2011
Nevada 2nd Dean Heller
(R)
Resigned May 9, 2011, when appointed to the Senate.[18]
A special election was held September 13, 2011.[24]
Mark Amodei
(R)
September 15, 2011
New York 9th Anthony Weiner
(D)
Resigned June 21, 2011, due to a personal scandal.[25]
A special election was held September 13, 2011.[26]
Bob Turner
(R)
September 15, 2011
Oregon 1st David Wu
(D)
Resigned August 3, 2011, due to a personal scandal.
A special election will be held January 31, 2012.[27]
TBD TBD

Committees

[ Section contents: Senate: Standing, Special, select, and otherHouse: Standing, Select • Joint ]

Senate

Standing committees

Committee Chair
(D)
Ranking member
(R)
  Subcommittees
Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Debbie Stabenow Pat Roberts
  Commodities, Markets, Trade and Risk Management   Ben Nelson   Saxby Chambliss
Conservation, Forestry and Natural Resources Michael Bennet John Boozman
Jobs, Rural Economic Growth and Energy Innovation Sherrod Brown John Thune
Livestock, Dairy, Poultry, Marketing and Agriculture Security Kirsten Gillibrand Mike Johanns
Nutrition, Specialty Crops, Food and Agricultural Research Bob Casey Richard Lugar
Appropriations Daniel Inouye Thad Cochran
  Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies   Herb Kohl   Roy Blunt
Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Barbara Mikulski Kay Bailey Hutchison
Defense Daniel Inouye Thad Cochran
Energy and Water Development Dianne Feinstein Lamar Alexander
Financial Services and General Government Richard Durbin Jerry Moran
Homeland Security Mary Landrieu Dan Coats
Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Jack Reed Lisa Murkowski
Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Tom Harkin Richard Shelby
Legislative Branch Ben Nelson John Hoeven
Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Tim Johnson Mark Kirk
State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Patrick Leahy Lindsey Graham
Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Patty Murray Susan Collins
Armed Services Carl Levin John McCain
  Airland   Joe Lieberman   Scott Brown
Emerging Threats and Capabilities Kay Hagan Rob Portman
Personnel Jim Webb Lindsey Graham
Readiness and Management Support Claire McCaskill Kelly Ayotte
SeaPower Jack Reed Roger Wicker
Strategic Forces Ben Nelson Jeff Sessions
Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Tim Johnson Richard Shelby
  Economic Policy   John Tester   David Vitter
Financial Institutions and Consumer Protection Sherrod Brown Bob Corker
Housing, Transportation, and Community Development Robert Menendez Jim DeMint
Securities, Insurance, and Investment Jack Reed Mike Crapo
Security and International Trade and Finance Mark Warner Mike Johanns
Budget Kent Conrad Jeff Sessions
Commerce, Science and Transportation Jay Rockefeller Kay Bailey Hutchison
  Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security   Maria Cantwell   John Thune
Communications, Technology, and the Internet John Kerry John Ensign, then Jim DeMint
Competitiveness, Innovation, and Export Promotion Amy Klobuchar Roy Blunt
Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance Mark Pryor Pat Toomey
Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and Coast Guard Mark Begich Olympia Snowe
Science and Space Bill Nelson John Boozman
Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety, and Security Frank Lautenberg Roger Wicker
Energy and Natural Resources Jeff Bingaman Lisa Murkowski
  Energy   Maria Cantwell   Jim Risch
National Parks Mark Udall Richard Burr
Public Lands and Forests Ron Wyden John Barrasso
Water and Power Debbie Stabenow Mike Lee
Environment and Public Works Barbara Boxer Jim Inhofe
  Children’s Health and Environmental Responsibility   Amy Klobuchar   Lamar Alexander
Clean Air and Nuclear Safety Tom Carper John Barrasso
Green Jobs and the New Economy Bernie Sanders John Boozman
Oversight Sheldon Whitehouse Mike Johanns
Superfund, Toxics and Environmental Health Frank Lautenberg Mike Crapo
Transportation and Infrastructure Max Baucus David Vitter
Water and Wildlife Ben Cardin Jeff Sessions
Finance Max Baucus Orrin Hatch
  Energy, Natural Resources, and Infrastructure   Jeff Bingaman   John Cornyn
Fiscal Responsibility and Economic Growth Bill Nelson Mike Crapo
Health Care Jay Rockefeller John Ensign, then Chuck Grassley
International Trade, Customs, and Global Competitiveness Ron Wyden John Thune
Social Security, Pensions, and Family Policy Debbie Stabenow Tom Coburn
Taxation and IRS Oversight Kent Conrad Jon Kyl
Foreign Relations John Kerry Richard Lugar
  Western Hemisphere, Peace Corps and Narcotics Affairs   Robert Menendez   Marco Rubio
Near Eastern and South and Central Asian Affairs Bob Casey, Jr. Jim Risch
African Affairs Chris Coons Johnny Isakson
East Asian and Pacific Affairs Jim Webb James Inhofe
International Operations and Organizations, Human Rights, Democracy and Global Women's Issues Barbara Boxer Jim DeMint
European Affairs Jeanne Shaheen John Barrasso
International Development and Foreign Assistance, Economic Affairs, and International Environmental Protection Ben Cardin Bob Corker
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Tom Harkin Mike Enzi
  Subcommittee on Children and Families   Patty Murray   Richard Burr
Subcommittee on Employment and Workplace Safety Barbara Mikulski Johnny Isakson
Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging Bernie Sanders Rand Paul
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Joe Lieberman Susan Collins
  Contracting Oversight (Ad Hoc)   Claire McCaskill   Rob Portman
Disaster Recovery and Intergovernmental Affairs (Ad Hoc) Mark Pryor John Ensign, then Rand Paul
Federal Financial Management, Government Information and International Security Thomas Carper Scott Brown
Investigations (Permanent) Carl Levin Tom Coburn
Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce and the District of Columbia Daniel Akaka Rob Johnson
Judiciary Patrick Leahy Chuck Grassley
  Administrative Oversight and the Courts   Amy Klobuchar   Jeff Sessions
Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights Herb Kohl Mike Lee
The Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights Dick Durbin Lindsey Graham
Crime and Terrorism Sheldon Whitehouse Jon Kyl
Immigration, Refugees and Border Security Chuck Schumer John Cornyn
Privacy, Technology and the Law Al Franken Tom Coburn
Rules and Administration Chuck Schumer Lamar Alexander
Small Business and Entrepreneurship Mary Landrieu Olympia Snowe
Veterans' Affairs Patty Murray Richard Burr

Special, select, and other committees

Committee Chair Vice chair
Indian Affairs Daniel Akaka John Barrasso
Select Committee on Ethics Barbara Boxer Johnny Isakson
Select Committee on Intelligence Dianne Feinstein Saxby Chambliss
Special Committee on Aging Herb Kohl Bob Corker

House of Representatives

Standing committees

Committee Chair
(R)
Ranking member
(D)
  Subcommittees
Agriculture Frank Lucas Collin C. Peterson
  Conservation, Energy, and Forestry   Glenn Thompson   Tim Holden
Department Operations, Oversight, and Credit Jeff Fortenberry Marcia Fudge
General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Mike Conaway Leonard Boswell
Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Tom Rooney Dennis Cardoza
Nutrition and Horticulture Jean Schmidt Joe Baca
Rural Development, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture Timothy V. Johnson Jim Costa
Appropriations Hal Rogers Norm Dicks
  Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies   Jack Kingston   Sam Farr
Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Frank Wolf Chaka Fattah
Defense Bill Young Norm Dicks
Energy and Water Development Rodney Frelinghuysen Pete Visclosky
Financial Services and General Government Jo Ann Emerson José Serrano
Homeland Security Robert Aderholt David Price
Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Mike Simpson Jim Moran
Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Denny Rehberg Rosa DeLauro
Legislative Branch Ander Crenshaw Mike Honda
Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies John Culberson Sanford Bishop
State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Kay Granger Nita Lowey
Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Tom Latham John Olver
Armed Services Buck McKeon Adam Smith
  Emerging Threats and Capabilities   Mac Thornberry   Jim Langevin
Military Personnel Joe Wilson Susan Davis
Oversight and Investigations Rob Wittman Jim Cooper
Readiness Randy Forbes Madeleine Bordallo
Seapower and Projection Forces Todd Akin Mike McIntyre
Strategic Forces Mike Turner Loretta Sanchez
Tactical Air and Land Forces Roscoe Bartlett Silvestre Reyes
Budget Paul Ryan Chris Van Hollen
Education and the Workforce John Kline George Miller
  Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education   Duncan D. Hunter   Dale Kildee
Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions Phil Roe Rob Andrews
Higher Education and Workforce Training Virginia Foxx Ruben Hinojosa
Workforce Protections Tim Walberg Lynn Woolsey
Energy and Commerce Fred Upton Henry Waxman
  Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade   Mary Bono Mack   G. K. Butterfield
Communications and Technology Greg Walden Anna Eshoo
Energy and Power Ed Whitfield Bobby Rush
Environment and the Economy John Shimkus Gene Green
Health Joe Pitts Frank Pallone
Oversight and Investigations Cliff Stearns Diana DeGette
Ethics Jo Bonner Linda Sanchez
Financial Services Spencer Bachus Barney Frank
  Capital Markets and Government-Sponsored Enterprises   Scott Garrett   Maxine Waters
Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology Ron Paul William Clay, Jr.
Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit Shelley Moore Capito Carolyn B. Maloney
Insurance, Housing and Community Opportunity Judy Biggert Luis Gutierrez
International Monetary Policy and Trade Gary Miller Carolyn McCarthy
Oversight and Investigations Randy Neugebauer Michael Capuano
Foreign Affairs Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Howard Berman
  Africa, Global Health, and Human Rights   Chris Smith   Donald Payne
Asia and the Pacific Donald A. Manzullo Eni Faleomavaega
Europe and Eurasia Dan Burton Gregory Meeks
Middle East and South Asia Steve Chabot Gary Ackerman
Oversight and Investigations Dana Rohrabacher Russ Carnahan
Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade Ed Royce Brad Sherman
Western Hemisphere Connie Mack IV Eliot Engel
Homeland Security Peter T. King Bennie Thompson
  Border and Maritime Security   Candice Miller   Henry Cuellar
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications Gus Bilirakis Laura Richardson
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies Dan Lungren Yvette Clarke
Counterterrorism and Intelligence Pat Meehan Jane Harman, then Jackie Speier
Oversight, Investigations, and Management Michael McCaul William R. Keating
Transportation Security Mike D. Rogers Sheila Jackson Lee
House Administration Dan Lungren Bob Brady
  Oversight   Phil Gingrey   Zoe Lofgren
Elections Gregg Harper Bob Brady
Judiciary Lamar S. Smith John Conyers
  Courts, Commercial and Administrative Law   Howard Coble   Steve Cohen
Constitution Trent Franks Jerrold Nadler
Intellectual Property, Competition, and the Internet Bob Goodlatte Mel Watt
Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security Jim Sensenbrenner Bobby Scott
Immigration Policy and Enforcement Elton Gallegly Zoe Lofgren
Natural Resources Doc Hastings Ed Markey
  Energy and Mineral Resources   Doug Lamborn   Rush D. Holt
Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans and Insular Affairs John Fleming Donna Christensen
Indian and Alaska Native Affairs Don Young Dan Boren
National Parks, Forests and Public Lands Rob Bishop Raúl Grijalva
Water and Power Tom McClintock Grace Napolitano
Oversight and Government Reform Darrell Issa Elijah Cummings
  Federal Workforce, U.S. Postal Service and Labor Policy   Dennis A. Ross   Stephen Lynch
Government Organization, Efficiency and Financial Management Todd Platts Ed Towns
Health Care, District of Columbia, Census and the National Archives Trey Gowdy Danny K. Davis
National Security, Homeland Defense and Foreign Operations Jason Chaffetz John F. Tierney
Regulatory Affairs, Stimulus Oversight and Government Spending Jim Jordan Dennis Kucinich
TARP, Financial Services and Bailouts of Public and Private Programs Patrick McHenry Michael Quigley
Technology, Information Policy, Intergovernmental Relations and Procurement Reform James Lankford Gerry Connolly
Rules David Dreier Louise Slaughter
  Legislative and Budget Process   Pete Sessions   Alcee Hastings
Rules and the Organization of the House Rich Nugent Jim McGovern
Science, Space and Technology Ralph Hall Eddie Bernice Johnson
  Space and Aeronautics   Steven Palazzo   Gabrielle Giffords
Technology and Innovation Ben Quayle David Wu, then Donna Edwards
Research and Science Education Mo Brooks Dan Lipinski
Investigations and Oversight Paul Broun Donna Edwards
Energy and Environment Andy Harris Brad Miller
Small Business Sam Graves Nydia Velazquez
  Agriculture, Energy and Trade   Scott Tipton   Mark Critz
Healthcare and Technology Renee Ellmers Cedric Richmond
Economic Growth, Tax and Capital Access Joe Walsh Kurt Schrader
Contracting and Workforce Mick Mulvaney Judy Chu
Investigations, Oversight and Regulations Mike Coffman Jason Altmire
Transportation and Infrastructure John Mica Nick Rahall
  Aviation   Thomas Petri   Jerry Costello
Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Frank LoBiondo Rick Larsen
Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management Jeff Denham Eleanor Holmes Norton
Highways and Transit John J. Duncan, Jr. Peter DeFazio
Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials Bill Shuster Corrine Brown
Water Resources and Environment Bob Gibbs Tim Bishop
Veterans' Affairs Jeff Miller Bob Filner
  Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs   Jon Runyan   Jerry McNerney
Economic Opportunity Marlin Stutzman Bruce Braley
Health Ann Marie Buerkle Mike Michaud
Oversight and Investigations Bill Johnson Joe Donnelly
Ways and Means Dave Camp Sander Levin
  Health   Wally Herger   Pete Stark
Human Resources Geoff Davis Lloyd Doggett
Oversight Charles Boustany John Lewis
Select Revenue Measures Pat Tiberi Richard Neal
Social Security Sam Johnson Xavier Becerra
Trade Kevin Brady Jim McDermott

Select committees

Committees Chair
(R)
Ranking member
(D)
  Subcommittees
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Mike Rogers Dutch Ruppersberger
  Oversight   Lynn Westmoreland   Jan Schakowsky
Technical and Tactical Intelligence Joe Heck Adam Schiff
Terrorism, HUMINT, Analysis and Counterintelligence Sue Myrick Mike Thompson

Joint appointments

Committee Chair Ranking member
Joint Economic Committee Sen. Bob Casey (D) Rep. Kevin Brady (R)
Joint Committee on the Library Sen. Chuck Schumer (D) Rep. Gregg Harper (R)
Joint Committee on Printing Rep. Gregg Harper (R) Sen. Chuck Schumer (D)
Joint Committee on Taxation Rep. Dave Camp (R) Sen. Max Baucus (D)
Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies (Special) inactive
Joint Committee on Deficit Reduction (Select) Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R, co-chair)
Sen. Patty Murray (D, co-chair)

Administrative officers

Senate

House of Representatives

See also

Elections

  • United States congressional elections, 2010 (elections held in advance of this Congress)
  • United States congressional elections, 2012 (elections to be held during this Congress)

Membership lists

  • List of freshman class members of the 112th United States Congress

References

  1. ^ Pub.L. 111-289
  2. ^ Zeleny, Jeff (November 2, 2010). "G.O.P. Captures House, but Not Senate". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/03/us/politics/03elect.html?_r=1&hp. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  3. ^ Abramowitz, Alan (December 12, 2010). "Get ready for the most conservative Congress ever". Salon.com. Salon Media Group. http://www.salon.com/news/politics/war_room/2010/12/12/abramowitz_congress_ideology. Retrieved January 25, 2011. 
  4. ^ Yadron, Danny (January 6, 2011). "House Reads Constitution, Gets Civics Lesson". Wall Street Journal. http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2011/01/06/house-reads-constitution-gets-civics-lesson/. Retrieved January 12, 2011. 
  5. ^ Rowley, James (April 7, 2011). "U.S. Government Shutdown Threatens 800,000 People As Obama Seeks Solution". Bloomberg. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-07/government-shutdown-threatens-800-000-as-obama-seeks-solution.html. Retrieved May 10, 2011. 
  6. ^ "US budget talks remain deadlocked". Al Jazeera. April 8, 2011. http://english.aljazeera.net/news/americas/2011/04/201147223956421145.html. Retrieved May 10, 2011. 
  7. ^ a b Davis, Julie Hirschfeld; Faler, Brian (April 9, 2011). "Wrangle Over U.S. Budget Compromise Defines Next Two Years' Fiscal Debate". Bloomberg. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-08/obama-leaders-fail-to-reach-budget-deal-after-third-meeting-in-two-days.html. Retrieved May 10, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Pres. Obama and Congressional Leaders Reach Budget Deal". CSPAN. April 8, 2011. http://www.c-span.org/Events/Midnight-Deadline-Looms-Until-Government-Shutdown/10737420771. Retrieved May 10, 2011. 
  9. ^ Dodge, Catherine; Goldman, Julianna (April 8, 2011). "Long Government Shutdown Would Harm U.S. Economy, Hit Washington Hardest". Bloomberg. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-08/long-government-shutdown-would-harm-u-s-economy-hit-washington-hardest.html. Retrieved May 10, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Editorial: Government shutdown survival guide". The Washington Times. April 7, 2011. http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/apr/7/government-shutdown-survival-guide. Retrieved May 10, 2011. 
  11. ^ Goldman, Julianna (April 7, 2011). "Boehner Gets Paid While Soldiers Wait When Congress Shuts Down Government". Bloomberg. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-07/boehner-gets-paid-while-soldiers-wait-when-congress-shuts-down-government.html. Retrieved May 10, 2011. "Members of Congress 'shouldn’t be getting paid, just like federal employees shouldn't be getting paid' during a shutdown, Boehner said today on ABC’s 'Good Morning America'" 
  12. ^ "U.S. Senate, Democratic Committees". http://democrats.senate.gov/committee. Retrieved May 5, 2011. 
  13. ^ "U.S. Senate Conference Secretaries". http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Conference_Secretaries.htm. Retrieved May 5, 2011. 
  14. ^ a b c "U.S. Senate, Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee". http://democrats.senate.gov/leadership. Retrieved August 10, 2011. 
  15. ^ Office of the Speaker of the House (December 2, 2010). "Pelosi Announces Steering and Policy Committee Members". PR Newswire. http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/pelosi-announces-steering-and-policy-committee-members-111212524.html. Retrieved February 17, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Congressman Capuano's Update". FN Online. February 3, 2011. http://www.fenwaynews.org/press-release/congressman-capuanos-update-2. Retrieved February 16, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Nevada Sen. John Ensign announces resignation". Politico. April 21, 2011. http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0411/53557.html. 
  18. ^ a b Murray, Mark (April 27, 2011). "Sandoval appoints Heller to fill Ensign seat". NBC News. http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/04/27/6544161-sandoval-appoints-heller-to-fill-ensign-seat. 
  19. ^ http://www.lvrj.com/news/heller-in-transition-one-foot-in-house-one-foot-in-senate-121223624.html?ref=624
  20. ^ "Lee Resigns After Photos Surface". Political Wire. February 9, 2011. http://politicalwire.com/archives/2011/02/09/lee_resigns_after_photos_surface.html. 
  21. ^ "Governor Cuomo Signs Bill to Ensure Military Voters are Treated Fairly in Special Elections, Calls Special Election in 26th Congressional District". Governor of New York's Press Office. March 9, 2011. http://www.governor.ny.gov/press/030911cuomosignsbill. Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  22. ^ Allen, Mike; Cohen, Richard E. (February 7, 2011). "Rep. Jane Harman to resign from House". Politco.com. http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0211/48984.html. Retrieved February 17, 2011. 
  23. ^ "Governor Brown Issues Proclamation Declaring Special Election for 36th Congressional District". Governor of California Press Release. March 14, 2011. http://gov.ca.gov/news.php?id=16934. Retrieved March 14, 2011. 
  24. ^ "Sandoval Sets Fall Special to Fill Heller’s Seat". Roll Call. April 29, 2011. http://www.rollcall.com/news/sandoval_sets_fall_special_to_fill_hellers_seat-205211-1.html?pos=hln. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  25. ^ Camia, Catalina (June 20, 2011). "Anthony Weiner Officially Steps Down Tuesday". USA Today. http://content.usatoday.com/communities/onpolitics/post/2011/06/anthony-weiner-resignation-sex-scandal-/1. Retrieved June 21, 2011. 
  26. ^ "Governor Cuomo Sets Special Elections for September 13 to Coincide with Statewide Primary Day". Governor of New York's Press Office. July 1, 2011. http://www.governor.ny.gov/press/070111specialelection. Retrieved July 1, 2011. 
  27. ^ Freking, Kevin (August 4, 2011). "Wu notifies governor, speaker of resignation". Associated Press. Yahoo! News. http://old.news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110804/ap_on_go_co/us_wu_resignation. Retrieved August 4, 2011. 
  28. ^ S.Res. 5, 112th Congress
  29. ^ a b c d H.Res. 1, Electing officers of the House of Representatives, 112th Congress
  30. ^ See: Rules of the House: "Other officers and officials"

Further reading

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Members of the 112th United States Congress — A joint session of the 112th Congress for the 2011 State of the Union Address. The 112th United States Congress consists of 541 elected officials from 50 states, five territories, and the District of Columbia. It is the federal legislature of the …   Wikipedia

  • United States Congress — For the current Congress, see 112th United States Congress. United States Congress 112th United States Congress …   Wikipedia

  • United States Congress Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction — The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction,[1] colloquially referred to as the Supercommittee, is a joint select committee of the United States Congress, created by the Budget Control Act of 2011 on August 2, 2011. The act was intended to… …   Wikipedia

  • United States Congress Joint Economic Committee — The Joint Economic Committee (JEC) is one of four standing joint committees of the U.S. Congress. The committee was established as a part of the Employment Act of 1946, which deemed the committee responsible for reporting the current economic… …   Wikipedia

  • 111th United States Congress — United States Capitol (2007) Duration: January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2011 Senate President: Dick Cheney (R) …   Wikipedia

  • 110th United States Congress — United States Capitol (2007) Duration: January 3, 2007 – January 3, 2009 Senate President: Dick Cheney (R) …   Wikipedia

  • Delegate (United States Congress) — A delegate to Congress is a non voting member of the United States House of Representatives who is elected from a U.S. territory and from Washington, D.C. to a two year term. While unable to vote in the full House, a non voting delegate may vote… …   Wikipedia

  • List of freshman class members of the 111th United States Congress — 40 new members of the 111th Congress. (One pictured member, Marcia Fudge, is not technically a freshman; as she was sworn in near the end of the 110th Congress.) The 111th United States Congress began on January 3, 2009. As of November 30, 2010,… …   Wikipedia

  • Members of the 111th United States Congress — The 111th United States Congress, in session from 2009–2010, consisted of 541 elected officials from 50 states, five territories, and the District of Columbia. It is the federal legislature of the United States of America, continuing an unbroken… …   Wikipedia

  • Biographical Directory of the United States Congress — The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress as well as its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.