Nishmat


Nishmat

Nishmat (נשמת or Nishmat Kol Chai, The breath of every living thing) is a Jewish prayer that is recited following the Song of the Sea during Pesukei D'Zimrah but before Yishtabach on Shabbat and Yom Tov. It is also recited during the Passover seder in some traditions[1]. The recitation of this prayer is not required by halakha in Judaism, but nevertheless, is prized by halakhic authorities because the concepts covered in this prayer are basic to Halakha[2].

Nishmat and Yishtabach are in some ways considered to be one long prayer, abridged just to Yishtabach on weekdays when there is no time to recite the entire prayer[3].

In this prayer, the word Nishmat (breath) that begins the prayer is related to the word neshama (soul), suggesting that the soul is part of the breath of all life[4]. The theme of the prayer is the uniqueness of G-d[5].

Some halakha can be derived from the prayer Nishmat. The commandment Do not lie idly by the blood of your neighbor requires a person to rescue another s/he sees is in danger. But from Nishmat, it can be seen that one who is not physically present where the danger is taking place is exempt from performing any rescue action[6]. Some examples of this include the obligation to rescue a person from a burning building in one's own location, but an exemption from the obligation to donate an organ when doing so can save a life (though doing so is still permitted)[7].

Origin

Nishmat is considered one of the masterpieces of Jewish liturgy. It is seen as a journey of self-discovery, describing G-d as a source of prayer[8].

The existence of this prayer is believed to have been from early on. The Talmud attributes the prayer to Rabbi Yochanan in the third century, but there are opinions that it may be older[9].

Nishmat became a standard part of the liturgy by the time of Saadia Gaon[10].

The exact author of the prayer is not known. Some scholars have suggested that it was authored by a man named Yitzchak (יצחק, Isaac) with a wife named Rivka (רבקה, Rebecca) based on the acrostic arrangement of the verses, but others have dismissed this idea[11].

Some scholars have suggested that the author's name may have been Shimon (שמון, Simon) from an acrostic within the prayer, and have considered this could be Shimon ben Shetach or perhaps even Apostle Peter, whose Hebrew name was Shimon, which would place the date of authorship at around 100 BCE[12].

References

  1. ^ Preparing your heart for Passover: a guide for spiritual readiness By Kerry M. Olitzky, page 82
  2. ^ My People's Prayer Book: Shabbat morning : Shacharit and Musaf By Lawrence A. Hoffman, page 45, 58
  3. ^ Festival of freedom: essays on Pesah and the Haggadah By Joseph Dov Soloveitchik, Joel B. Wolowelsky, Reuven Ziegler, page 112
  4. ^ The Book of Blessings: New Jewish Prayers for Daily Life, the Sabbath, and ... By Marcia Falk, page 490
  5. ^ 1,001 Questions and Answers on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur By Jeffrey M. Cohen, page 166
  6. ^ Contemporary halakhic problems, Volume 4 By J. David Bleich, page 310
  7. ^ Contemporary halakhic problems, Volume 4 By J. David Bleich, page 314
  8. ^ Finding our way: Jewish texts and the lives we lead today By Barry W. Holtz, page 115
  9. ^ My People's Prayer Book: Shabbat morning : Shacharit and Musaf By Lawrence A. Hoffman, page 59
  10. ^ The contemplative soul: Hebrew poetry and philosophical theory in medieval Spain By Adena Tanenbaum, pages 17-18
  11. ^ 1,001 Questions and Answers on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur By Jeffrey M. Cohen, page 167
  12. ^ The JPS guide to Jewish traditions By Ronald L. Eisenberg, Jewish Publication Society, page 411

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